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Noted Writer Confronts UK for Reparations Failures

Writer Afua Hirsch doesn’t shy away from difficult questions and recently wrote about one she posed to a British cabinet minister. “Why,” she asked the minister, “has England never apologized for the transatlantic slave trade?” Britain, she reminded him, had trafficked more enslaved Africans than almost any other nation. However, the most the European country…

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Former Liberian Leader Joins Panel Investigating The Global Response To COVID-19

The World Health Organization (WHO) has announced that Ellen Johnson Sirleaf, Liberia’s former president, and Helen Clark, New Zealand’s former prime minister, are to head a panel to review the global response to the Covid19 pandemic. Johnson Sirleaf and Clark will head the newly formed Independent Panel for Pandemic Preparedness and Response. The announcement follows…

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Opposition To Prime Minister Swells After Murder Of Popular Protest Singer

Ethiopian protest singer and revered musician Hachalu Hundessa sang about love and unity, recalled his friend Amensisa Ifa, raising issues that many would not dare to raise. He addressed issues of marginalization – capturing the struggles and frustrations of his Oromo people who faced efforts by successive Ethiopian regimes to destroy the Oromoo language, exploit…

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Black Lives Matter Spurs More Changes In Africa

As Americans explore the renaming of army bases, statues, streets, and schools that honor racist slave-holders or portray demeaning relationships between whites and Black, Brown and Latinx citizens, similar efforts are underway in Senegal and Liberia most recently. Goree, an island in Senegal linked closely with slave trade, has decided to rename one of its…

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Claflin Receives Grant to Support Women Entrepreneurs in the United States and India

Claflin University was awarded a grant for nearly $75,000 to conduct research and develop training to enhance women’s entrepreneurship in family-owned businesses. The Partnership 2020: Leveraging US-India Cooperation in Higher Education to Harness Economic Opportunities and Innovation grant is a subaward from the University of Nebraska at Omaha’s Center for Afghanistan Studies. The grant creates a partnership between…

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Statues Honoring Racist Past Are Coming Down From The U.S. To Europe

On the occasion of the 60th anniversary of Congo’s independence from Belgium, the Congolese diaspora is looking for the removal of racist statues but not only that. “Many think that our political conscience has just sparked now, but we have been here for decades,” says Mireille-Thseusi Robert, president of the feminist and anti-racism committee, Bamko-Cran.…

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Election Rerun In Malawi Scores Upset Victory For Opposition 

In a landmark presidential rerun, Malawi’s sitting President has been ousted from power after a sweeping victory by a popular Pentecostal preacher and former theology lecturer who promised to unite and serve all Malawians. “I want to provide leadership that makes everybody prosper, that deals decisively with corruption and theft of public funds and a…

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Massive Red Dust Cloud From The Sahara Reaches America’s South

A brilliant red sky at dusk can be seen in states along the Atlantic but the eye-popping show should be watched with some caveats. Things to consider when it comes to the dust cloud include the size of the particles, the concentration and the composition of the particles. When it comes to size, approximately 30%…

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Unexpected Rift Exposed Over Africa Seat In U.N. Security Council

The Africa seat at the United Nations Security Council was the subject of a heated duel between two African countries who lobbied fiercely for the powerful prize. On a second round of balloting, the seat went to Kenya which garnered 129 votes against 62 votes for Djibouti. In the first round of voting on Wednesday,…

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Ugandans Launch Drive To ‘Decolonize’ Local Area Streets

A petition to rename roads honoring British colonial figures has gathered thousands of names. The move comes as similar actions against dubious historical figures are taking place in the U.S. and South Africa. Speke Road, for example, is named after the British explorer John Hanning Speke, the first European to reach Nyanza, one of the…

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Why I’m Proud of the B-CU Grads that Protested Betsy “DeVoid”

By Julianne Malveaux (NNPA Newswire Columnist) I could not be more proud of the students at Bethune-Cookman University (B-CU) than if I had raised them myself. Responding to the university’s very late selection of Education Secretary Betsy for the spring commencement speaker, graduating seniors chose to turn their backs on a woman who described HBCUs…

Trump’s Plans to Weaken Environmental Protections Would Harm Black Communities

By Keith Rushing   The Trump administration has made clear that it plans to limit environmental protections and reverse course on the stronger regulations achieved under President Barack Obama out of concern for the bottom lines of corporate America. Mainstream media has covered Trump’s decision to prioritize private profits over public health and the well-being…

Climate Change is Creating Climate Refugees

By Bill Fletcher, Jr. (NNPA Newswire Columnist) Have you ever heard of the Marshall Islands? They are 1156 islands that constitute a republic in the South Pacific. Major battles during World War II were contested on those islands and, following the war, nuclear tests were conducted on there, too, from which there was significant radioactive…

Environmental justice must be a national priority

By Congressman Donald M. Payne, Jr. (N.J.-10) Too often missing in discussions on the challenges facing African Americans is any focus on environmental justice, the idea that all people should enjoy a clean, healthy environment while being treated equally with regard to environmental policies, regulations, and laws. African-American communities are disproportionately burdened by environmental degradation,…

The Continuing Scourge of Poverty, Hunger and Hopelessness in Rich America

By Marian Wright Edelman  A true revolution of values will soon cause us to question the fairness and justice of many of our past and present policies. On the one hand we are called to play the Good Samaritan on life’s roadside, but that will be only an initial act. One day we must come…

A Time to Break Silence

By Marian Wright Edelman  Fifty years ago on April 4, 1967, our prophet Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. gave the historic speech “Beyond Vietnam: A Time to Break Silence” at New York City’s Riverside Church. It was his first major public antiwar speech and a powerful warning that a rise in racial hatred, militarism and…

Calhoun Statue A Pump Fake

July 18, 2020

By Barney Blakeney Okay so they took it down, now what? I say THEY took it (the statue of slavery advocate John C. Calhoun) down because they put it up. Removal of the statue wasn’t up to us and perhaps had very little to do with us. But again, now that the statue is gone,…

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Pandemonium and Pandemic

July 15, 2020

By Beverly Gadson-Birch I have been around a few corners or two in my life and listened to many opinions—some I agree with and others I flat out disagree with. I have been writing this column for some forty years. When I decided to write a weekly column, it was intended to inform and not conform to…

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My Mom and the Importance of Realizing that Black Lives Matter

July 9, 2020

By Hakim Abdul-Ali The recent protests events surrounding the May 25, 2020, killing of a brother of color named George Floyd in Minneapolis, Minnesota, ignited national and worldwide alarming concerns to all morally sane “hue-mans’ ” senses of equal justice everywhere. I, too, felt disdain by this Black man’s horrendous demise but, at my age, I’m…

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Whether Marching Or Voting, Do Your Part

July 7, 2020

By Barney Blakeney Just when I thought the vehement protests about police abuse of authority and use of force had slowed, them dang kids ramped it up again over the removal of the monument to John C. Calhoun that overlooks Marion Square and Calhoun Street in Charleston. They make me so proud! They ain’t letting…

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Police Officers: Get Rid Of Rotten Apples

July 2, 2020

By Beverly Gadson-Birch Enough is Enough! The week that was!  George Floyd was laid to rest last week in Houston. Several days later, Rayshard Brooks, 27-year old husband and father of four, was killed by Atlanta police. According to news reports, police were called to Wendy’s on University Avenue to investigate a man, later identified as Brooks,…

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Thru the Lens of Someone Other than Yourself

June 30, 2020

By Hakim Abdul-Ali It’s been a tragic but ever-so-revolting last couple of weeks in the USA in so many unfathomable norms of ordinary understandings. And after the horrific killing of George Floyd on May 25, in Minneapolis, Minnesota, the world-at-large has voiced its mighty and resounding distaste about this murder in almost unimaginable expressions of…

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2000 Acres – No Mule

By D.R.E. James Charleston is to chattel slavery what Las Vegas is to legalized gambling. Magnolia Plantation could very well be the Mirage, Boone Hall is Caesar’s Palace and Middleton Place, the MGM Grand. Both industries built their cities immense wealth from the ground up.The only difference is that one hosts world championship boxing matches…

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Former Educator Commends Jon Hale For Article Published In The Chronicle

To The Chronicle: I wish to commend Jon Hale on his column published in the Charleston Chronicle. It was well written. I wish I had been so well taught. Unlike Mr. Hale, I was exposed to a travesty of learning. My education focused on the inherent power of white males in Charleston. The mission of…

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Gullah Geechee Chamber Addresses Second Santee Cooper Employee Racist Post: What is going on at Santee Cooper?

    Statement made by Marilyn Hemingway, founder, and president of the Gullah Geechee Chamber of Commerce: “It is unacceptable that in two weeks, we find ourselves in a continuing loop of a Santee Cooper employee sharing their racism on social media for all the world to see. There is something deeply flawed at Santee…

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Are Our Demands For Black Liberation Insufficient? ”99 And ½ Won’t Do”

By Dr. William Small, Jr. The demonstrations for social justice, sparked by the killing of George Floyd on May 25, 2020, has generated a new series of conversations about racial and social justice across America and in many other parts of the world. Having actively supported social justice and Black empowerment causes for over a half a century,…

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As COVID-19 continues to spread amid a growing number of fatalities, Dr. James Hildreth said it’s critical that everyone follows stay-at-home orders, social distancing guidelines, and anything else that could help keep Americans safe during the pandemic

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