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Global Peace Prize Awarded To Africa’s Youngest Leader

“Love is greater than modern weapons like tanks and missiles… Love can win hearts, and we have seen a great deal of it today here in Asmara.” Not many political leaders would admit to a vision of love over war and that may be why Abiy Ahmed, Prime Minister of Ethiopia, was the clear favorite…

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Uganda Outlaws Opposition Leader’s Trademark – The Red Beret

The Uganda government is taking action against the popular red beret, calling it official military clothing that could earn the wearer imprisonment for life. According to the new rule, the sale or wearing of any attire which resembles the army uniform is also banned. Prohibited items include side caps, bush hats, ceremonial forage caps and…

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Obscure Political Outsider Heads For The Presidency In Surprise Tunisian Upset

Exit polls are pointing to landslide win for a conservative law professor in an upset for the political establishment and the elites. Mr. Kais Saied, 61, an unlikely leader for the nation’s restless youth, promised to hand more power to young people and local governments. An expert in constitutional law, he taught in the Tunis…

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Unrest at the African Union Follows the Firing of Popular Ambassador

By Stacy M. Brown, NNPA Newswire Correspondent @StacyBrownMedia A speech denouncing France’s colonization of Africa and her continued efforts to unite Africa and the African Diaspora has cost H.E. Dr. Arikana Chihombori-Quao, the African Union’s Ambassador to the United States, her job. The African Union has given her until November 1 to clean out her…

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African Languages Among The Top Ten Spoken In U.S. Homes

If you think you’re hearing more Swahili, Yoruba, Amharic or Twi coming from your neighbor’s home, you’re right! Newly released data from the U.S. Census Bureau finds African languages are among the top ten fastest growing languages spoken at home in the U.S. The Census list features three groups of African languages: Swahili and other…

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Ethiopian ‘Thanksgiving’ Returns As A Joyous Affair

For the first time in 150 years, Ethiopia’s Oromo people celebrated “Thanksgiving” in “Finfinee” – also known as Addis Ababa. The country’s largest ethnic group turned up in the hundreds of thousands to mark “Ireecha” – a public outdoors event. People gathered around water bodies, holding tufts of grass to thank Waqqaa (God) and ask…

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Ugandan TV Host Wins Coveted Prize For Investigative Journalism 

Ugandan investigative reporter and news anchor Solomon Serwanjja is the 2019 winner of the Komla Dumor award. It goes to a journalist committed to changing the narrative about Africa. Serwanjja, a presenter at Uganda’s NBS TV, hosts one of the channel’s prime-time shows. He has also produced award-winning reports, including one for BBC’s Africa Eye…

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Profs Caught Seeking Sexual Favors In Undercover Sting At Top African Schools

A year-long investigation into sexual harassment by professors at the University of Lagos and the University of Ghana has produced evidence of a tolerated practice of “sex for grades” at the two top schools. Shocking tapes of university profs brazenly propositioning young women who had come seeking admission to classes or financial aid showed their…

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Advocates for Biafra and Journalists Against Corruption Face Gov’t Crackdown

The war may be over in a place called Biafra – a region of states in the southern part of Nigeria – but it remains a flashpoint for ethnic tensions that simmer just below the surface. This September, the leader of the Indigenous People of Biafra (IPOB), announced a meeting with world leaders at the…

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In The Grip Of A Nationwide Drought, Zimbabwe Faces A National Disaster

In a new low water mark for Zimbabwe’s troubled economy, two million people in Zimbabwe’s capital have now been left without water after the government ran out of foreign currency to pay for imported water treatment chemicals. Zimbabwe’s capital city shut its main water works on Monday, potentially leaving the city dry and raising the…

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FTC announces record $191M settlement against University of Phoenix: Secretary DeVos offers partial forgiveness for defrauded borrowers

By Charlene Crowell The University of Phoenix (UOP), one of the nation’s largest for-profit colleges will pay a record $191 million settlement to resolve charges stemming from a five-year investigation by the Federal Trade Commission (FTC). On December 10, Andrew Smith, Director of FTC’s Bureau of Consumer Protection noted it was the largest settlement the Commission…

Ask Dr. Kevin: Clinical Trials are the Foundation for Scientific Innovation

By Dr. Kevin Williams, Chief Medical Officer for Rare Disease at Pfizer The “Ask Dr. Kevin” series is brought to you by Pfizer Rare Disease in collaboration with the National Newspaper Publishers Association (NNPA) to increase understanding of sickle cell disease. Dr. Kevin Williams is the Chief Medical Officer for Rare Disease at Pfizer where he leads…

Peace and Strength

By Angela Sailor My daughter’s name is Alamni. It means “the one who brings peace.” She is in her second year at the United States Military Academy, the first in our family to join the ranks of the Long Gray Line. As her name suggests, her dream of becoming a West Point cadet was not…

House Judiciary Impeachment Hearings

By Dr. E. Faye Williams, Esq. (TriceEdneyWire.com) – A few days ago brilliant constitutional law professors testified in Congress on the grounds for impeachment after hearing the facts coming from the Intelligence Committee under the direction of Chairman Adam Schiff. If anyone had told me before this hearing that Professor Jonathan Turley would have taken…

Black Communities Are Making A Difference In The Fight Against AIDS

By Marc Morial (TriceEdneyWire.com) – “The fact that there’s a conversation that occurs on an annual basis on World AIDS Day is significant. The fact that the President of the United States, on an annual basis, now, comments and discusses AIDS, keeps it on the agenda. I think a very, very concrete outcome of that…

More Truths About Guns in America

By Marian Wright Edelman On November 6, 17-year-old Da’Qwan Jones-Morris, a former Children’s Defense Fund (CDF) Freedom Schools® scholar from St. Paul, Minnesota, was killed when he was accidentally shot in the chest by a 15-year-old friend playing with a stolen gun in our gun saturated nation. Da’Qwan and a group of friends were playing…

Election Commission Denies Singletary’s Protest For New Election

By Beverly Gadon-Birch On Monday, Mayoral Candidate John Singletary presented a formidable and compelling argument before Charleston County Election Commission for overturning North Charleston Mayoral Election that returned incumbent Keith Summey to office for a 7th term.  Singletary presented signed affidavits and videos of election irregularities that were accepted into evidence as exhibits. After viewing clips…

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Telling It Is Like It Is

By Hakim Abdul-Ali I’ve observed that in the living experience there are situations that arise where and when a lot of ethnic folk get tongue-twisted in trying to explain themselves, or trying to attempt to, in getting their point(s) across to others. Hmm! Does that sound familiar to you? I believe that it should because…

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Who Supports CCSD Supt. Gerrita Postlewait?

By Barney Blakeney I was talking to a friend digging up a story. He asked, whatever I did, don’t mention how much assistance Charleston County School District Superintendent Gerrita Postlewait gives to Black folk’s initiatives. He didn’t want to stir up political wrath against her. Like any good reporter, I always try to accommodate my…

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Change Needed For Charleston & North Charleston!!

By Beverly Gadson-Birch This is not one of those git down, sit down quizzical kind of articles you have grown accustomed to over the years. It’s voting time! You have the opportunity to elect responsible mayoral candidates for Charleston and North Charleston, also councilmembers. Sometimes we just need to talk about issues as they impact…

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Local Government Implosion

By Barney Blakeney The implosion of our national government is difficult to watch because it so much reminds me of what’s happening on the local scene. Ever since I became an adult and started interacting as a reporter in professional circles I’ve heard people refer to our community as “The Great State of Charleston”. Sarcastically…

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The Strength of a Winner

By Hakim Abdul-Al I consider what I do as a columnist as a special task. It’s one where I attempt to reflect on topical things that are going on around me and the greater world-at-large with spiritual comprehensions and insightful candor. I’d like to think that I’m that kind of journalist because I believe that it’s…

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Concerning The Snowden Community Sewer Issue

We, the Snowden Advocacy Group (SAG), are fully aware of and understand that county council has made the appropriate decision to postpone voting for approval of the ordinance regarding the community’s proposed public facility. We support the ordinance revisions to ensure that the unincorporated communities are not subject to overdevelopment and at increased risk for…

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Lowcountry Food Bank Urges South Carolina Senators to Support Efforts to Close the Summer Child Hunger Gap in South Carolina

“During the summer, a mere 17 percent of the more than 22 million children nationally who receive free or reduced-price lunch during the school year access a summer feeding program – and only 16.7 of children in South Carolina,” said Pat Walker, Lowcountry Food Bank President and CEO. “This leaves 307,109 of children in South…

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Seabrook: Trump Is A Dangerous Man

By Dr. Luther Seabrook, former educator Oh, how I yearn for the days of yesteryear when the leader of a country fronted his army and led them to war. They were real leaders. They were brave and of substance. Those days are gone, most likely forever. What do we have now? Our national leader is…

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Burn Down the Plantations (In Theory, At Least)

By D.R.E. James The biggest and baddest dudes on the corner of Aiken and Columbus Street paused their dice game as I approached. They felt compelled to inform me how crazy I was for wearing a hoodie that read, in gold stitching: “BURN DOWN THE PLANTATIONS”. These men were the biggest and the baddest on…

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Hair Love, an 2020 Oscar®-winning animated short film from Matthew A. Cherry, tells the heartfelt story of an African American father learning to do his daughter’s hair for the first time