Follow The Chronicle On Twitter

Red Card For Portugal Over Racist Abuse Of Malian Soccer Star

Racism is rife in international soccer, with fans taking physical and verbal aim at players of the opposing team. After the routine apologies of the coaches and local officials, what has really been done to end the frequent racist outbursts, often accompanied by flying chairs or banana peels? This week, star striker Moussa Marega of…

Read More

Uganda’s Queen Of Katwe Star Dies After Diagnosis Of Brain Cancer

Nikita Pearl Waligwa, who starred as the friend of chess prodigy Phiona Mutesi in the Disney film “The Queen of Katwe,” passed away this week after a valiant struggle with cancer. She was 15 years of age. The film, which starred David Oyelowo as the chess teacher, Lupita Nyong’o as Phiona’s mother, and Madina Nmwanta…

Read More

In Break With History, Malawi Court Tosses Fraud-Riddled Elections

Following an exhaustive review of petitions submitted by the opposition, judges of the Malawian Constitutional Court ruled against Peter Mutharika whose presidential victory last May was attributed to massive fraud. Veteran diplomat Vernon Mwaanga of neighboring Zambia said the Court raised the bar for African countries where elections are plagued by irregularities. “The Malawi judicial…

Read More

At African Union Summit, Ramaphosa Announces End Of Colonialism

A stirring call to action was delivered this week in the august hall of the African Union headquarters in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia, spoken by the incoming AU president Cyril Ramaphosa to distinguished members of the continental body representing over 40 countries. In his presentation at the AU’s 33rd summit, the South African President wove history…

Read More

South African Research For HIV Drug Goes Back To The Drawing Board

Vaccinations have been halted in a test of a new HIV vaccine after it proved no more effective than a placebo, researchers announced. In the “Uhambo” study – also called HVTN 702 – tested in South Africa – it was determined that 129 people who received the vaccine developed HIV while 123 who were given…

Read More

New Hurdle For Nigerians Seeking U.S. Visas To Settle Here

She’s your pediatrician. He’s your surgeon. She’s a civil engineer. He has a doctorate. She’s an Emmy Award winner. He was a Chicago Bear. They’re Nigerian-Americans who have set down roots in Dallas, Chicago, Baltimore, Atlanta, Phoenix and Houston – the latter of which has the largest Nigerian population outside Brazil and Africa. They’re the…

Read More

U.S. Launches New Deal For Africa As ‘Growth And Opportunity’ Act Soon To Expire

The African Growth and Opportunity Act (known as “AGOA”) which aimed to assist the economies of sub-Saharan Africa and improve economic relations between the U.S. and the region is out of step with the new trade deals of the Trump administration. In other words, time’s up. A new economic plan is on the drawing board…

Read More

A ‘Green’ Message Shakes Up The Industry At Mining Confab In South Africa

After years of defending dirty extractive industries such as the mining of coal, large mining companies seemed to have switched sides and joined the Greens, or so it seemed at the African Mining Indaba held last week in South Africa. At the Indaba, the continent’s biggest gathering of one of its most vital industries, the companies…

Read More

Authorities In Ivory Coast Launch Demolition Of Shantytowns Housing Thousands

Bulldozers have begun demolishing homes built in the shantytowns of Abidjan, the commercial capital of the Ivory Coast, leaving thousands without shelter as authorities carry out plans to build a buffer zone around an international airport. This comes as large numbers of Ivorians are leaving remote farms and villages for a better life. The demolitions…

Read More

AP News Wire Issues Apology For Cutting The Only Black Activist From A Group Shot

A group shot of young environmental activists at the World Economic Forum in Davos, Switzerland, appeared in final form without one of the activists. Vanessa Nakate of Uganda was missing from the photo of Greta Thunberg, Luisa Neubauer, Loukina Tille and Isabelle Axelsson. All the young women in the photo were white. Nakate confronted AP…

Read More

Add One More Name

By Dr. E. Faye Williams (TriceEdneyWire.com) – In his poem “No Man is an Island,” John Donne wrote, “Any man’s death diminishes me, because I am involved in mankind.” I’ve always been involved in humanitarian issues and the universality of justice.  This past week has been exceptionally difficult for me and anyone else with even an iota…

Obama’s Popularity Continues to Rise Amid Trump’s Rhetoric

By Stacy M. Brown, NNPA Newswire Senior Correspondent @StacyBrownMedia With unrestrained vitriol and the stunning lack of leadership emanating from the White House on an almost daily basis, the ever-rising popularity of former President Barack Obama is unmistakable. The media and most of the American public hang on every word and watch every move Obama…

Andrea Harris and the Fight for Minority Business

By Julianne Malveaux (TriceEdneyWire.com) – Andrea Harris was not well-known, but she should have been. She was the co-founder of the North Carolina Institute of  Minority Business Development, an advocate for social and economic justice, a champion for historically Black colleges and universities, and a Bennett Belle (Class of 1970) who passionately loved her college.…

Americans Have United Before to Defeat an External Enemy and We Can Again

By Jesse Jackson (TriceEdneyWire.com) – We live in a time of bitter divisions. Today, even the wearing of masks has become a partisan question. Yet, as this Memorial Day weekend reminds us, this country has united before to meet external threats. The calamity that has been wrought by the coronavirus is the result of an…

Even While Physically Distant, 2020 Grads Find Ways to Celebrate and Inspire

By Marc H. Morial (TriceEdneyWire.com) – “No one does big things by themselves. Right now, when people are scared, it’s easy to be cynical and say let me just look out for myself, or my family, or people who look or think or pray like me. But if we’re going to get through these difficult times;…

$3 Trillion HEROES Act promises more COVID-19 relief for consumers and businesses: Will the U.S. Senate act swiftly on the new legislative plan

By Charlene Crowell As the nation’s Center for Disease Control (CDC) tracks the spread of COVID-19, by mid-May, at least 1.6 million infections and over 92,000 deaths occurred. This data includes all 50 states, the District of Columbia and the territories of Guam, the Northern Mariana Islands, Puerto Rico, and the U.S Virgin Islands. At the same time,…

There Are No Bad Days

By Barney Blakeney It’s been a tough couple of weeks. Good thing I’ve decided not to have any more bad days – some may be better than others, but I don’t have bad days anymore. Still, the past couple of weeks have challenged that outlook. I was just coming down with some kind of ‘bug’…

Read More
Never Hate Yourself

By Hakim Abdul-Ali At this present time, our country and the rest of the world are going through some very difficult times. The dreaded COVID-19 virus, also known as coronavirus, is plaguing the earth and it, seemingly, has the world in its deadly, mystifying grip as of this column’s publication. It’s also at this time…

Read More
Coronavirus: COVID-19 Life Changing And Challenging

  By Beverly Gadson-Birch Good morning Charleston! Are y’all practicing safe health? When something terrible happened in black communities or the nation, older folk would say, “it’s praying time”. What time is it? Yep, “it’s praying time”. While I am very much concerned about the virus outbreak, I am not panicking. On a recent visit…

Read More
The Illusion of Delusion

By Barney Blakeney Often I’ll read stuff I already know which distresses me nonetheless. That happened last week while reading a report on a study written by NNPA reporter Stacy Brown. The study was about the economic and financial progress made by African Americans over the past five years. You hear it said some Black people…

Read More
Love for All is a Feeling Worth Initiating

By Hakim Abdul-Ali The world we live in today is full of all sorts of political twists, racial dilemmas and numerous secret prejudicial agendas. I don’t think any reasonable, clear thinking American ethnic soul in “hue-manity” can, or would, deny that. I’m a concerned American brother of color, and that’s a pretty real scenario for…

Read More
Judge Mikell R. Scarborough, Master-In-Equity: The Highest Form Of Fairness

By Beverly Gadson-Birch Life in the Holy City just ain’t that holy anymore. Once upon a time, a man’s word was his bond. His word was so trustworthy, you could take it to the bank and cash it in. Fast forward to now! What happened to truth in lending, truth in contracting, truth in sentencing,…

Read More
Medicare for All is important for South Carolinians, as well as for all Americans

The South Carolina AFL-CIO has been on record for many years as supporting Medicare for All. Most union members have better access to health care than others because their unions have fought to win those benefits from employers. However, as health insurance costs rise, and as employers try to take back those benefits we fought…

Read More
Letter to the editor in response to Chronicle article

I’m writing in response to the Charleston Chronicle’s January 17th article, “Santee Cooper Sale Should Be a 2020 Legislative Priority, Says Gullah Geechee Chamber.” Thank you for covering this issue, which is very important to me. I’m glad that the South Carolina House of Representatives passed a resolution for 100 percent clean energy by 2050.…

Read More
Citizens Want Excellence at IAAM

In a recent letter to the editor printed in the Post and Courier, Carol Ezell-Gilson asked why a project of the International African American Museum’s magnitude has gone unquestioned. The city is spending millions on a project to illuminate African American history with limited involvement of the African American community itself. The president and Chief…

Read More
Lest We Forget

65 years ago, we were ordered by the Supreme Court in Brown vs. Board of Education to desegregate our public schools. The term used, that I cannot connect with, was something like, “with all deliberate speed.” The initial response of a segment of the white community was closing the public schools; creating white, private academies; and numerous…

Read More
Loading Family Features Content Widget
Loading Family Features Article

Take Our Poll

Do you want to the Justice Department to release its Community Oriented Policing Services assessment of the North Charleston Police Department?

View Results

Loading ... Loading ...

As COVID-19 continues to spread amid a growing number of fatalities, Dr. James Hildreth said it’s critical that everyone follows stay-at-home orders, social distancing guidelines, and anything else that could help keep Americans safe during the pandemic

National Headlines