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On 50th Anniversary of King Assassination, We Have Work to Do

By Jesse Jackson The 50th anniversary of Dr. Martin Luther King’s assassination comes amid a fierce struggle for the soul of America. We will celebrate the progress that has been made since Dr. King was taken from us in 1968, and decry the agenda that is still unfinished. But we cannot ignore the systematic effort…

Ask Dr. Kevin – Stigma In Sickle Cell Disease: How It Affects ED Care

By Dr. Kevin Williams, Chief Medical Officer, Pfizer Rare Disease Unit The “Ask Dr. Kevin” series is brought to you by Pfizer Rare Disease in collaboration with the National Newspaper Publishers Association (NNPA) to increase understanding of sickle cell disease. The opioid crisis in the United States is at an all-time high, impacting thousands of…

What a Difference a Director Makes at CFPB: Trump Appointee Makes Changes to Help Companies, Not Consumers

By Charlene Crowell In 1959, the late Dinah Washington (1924-1963) won a Grammy Award for her R&B hit song, “What a Difference a Day Makes”. The song tells the story of how a blossoming romance dramatically changed life – for the better. Its last lyrics, conclude that “the difference is you”. When I consider the…

Let’s Move Forward Together

By Marian Wright Edelman In the spring of 1960, I was a senior at Spelman College in Atlanta and decided to help organize the civil rights student sit-in movement to desegregate lunch counters. I went to Atlanta’s City Hall to engage in our cause to end racial apartheid. I felt overwhelming gratitude for the chance…

Here’s One Way We Could Keep More Black Male Educators in the Classroom

By Francis Pina Does being me give me an advantage in my inner-city classroom? I often reflect on this question because every school year I learn from a handful of students that I am their very first Black male teacher. If we got 100 teachers in a room, statistically I would be one of just…

March For Our Lives Follows a Venerable American Tradition of Student Social Activism

By Marc H. Morial “By our readiness to allow arms to be purchased at will and fired at whim, by allowing our movie and television screens to teach our children that the hero is one who masters the art of shooting and the technique of killing, by allowing all these developments, we have created an…

A Mother’s Teachings About Patience

By Hakim Abdul-Ali      Greetings to you on this wonderful day. I trust that you know that this is a marvelous day also, even though I probably assume that there are some disillusioned and discontented  ethnic folk in “hue-manity” who may not feel the same way as I, or you, do. Those differences in…

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Blacks Can Read & Write

By Beverly Gadson-Birch    NFL players are not the first to protest during the National Anthem.  The players’ protest is in support of Colin Kaepernick and his right to kneel to bring attention to the disproportionate number of blacks that are killed by police officers in this country. In the back of my mind, I…

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You Stop Being Racist!

By Barney Blakeney     I recently took to Facebook. Mind you, I’m computer illiterate, but I figured Facebook gives me another avenue to do some work. It’s all about the work, ya’ll. Forty years ago, I thought I’d get rich at this writing thing, but that ain’t gonna happen. I’m blessed to be doing…

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Love Thy Neighbor – Community Relationships

By Victoria Rae Moore Dear Reader, How well do you know your neighbors? We used to be able to easily define communities by neighborhoods. Who are the families living in the neighborhood? What businesses exist there? Who owns and works at those businesses? That was a community. I feel like right now, due in part…

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A Thought to Consider

By Hakim Abdul-Ali     Living in today’s American landscapes of racial, political and societal complexities in many ways is frightening at times, especially if you’re of color. To say that “it is what it is” is to be putting it subtly at best. Also, I believe that you’ll probably agree that the living process…

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And The Brother Tells Me “Times Have Changed”

By Barney Blakeney It’s old news now. Too many public school students in Charleston County don’t perform well academically. The past few weeks I’ve been receiving reports about student performance. The information mostly has been depressing. Among some of the comments and statistics were: Tri-county region sees declines in key reading, math test results; 50,681…

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Hair Love, an 2020 Oscar®-winning animated short film from Matthew A. Cherry, tells the heartfelt story of an African American father learning to do his daughter’s hair for the first time