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Whereabouts of Ailing Presidents of Gabon in Debate

Gabonese President Ali Bongo is receiving medical treatment in London after his health deteriorated during a visit to the city, according to people familiar with the matter. But news of the absent president was immediately contradicted in an official press release this week in a pattern common to many ailing leaders. The leader of this…

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Surviving the Journey: Thousands Gather in a Weekend of Reflection and Healing to Remember, Honor the First Africans Brought as Captives to English North America 400 Years Ago

By Brian Palmer Special from the Richmond Free Press (TriceEdneyWire.com) – As day broke last Saturday, August 24, tides of people of all ages and colors flowed down the promenade at Hampton’s Buckroe Beach. Some were dressed for a day at the shore in shorts and T-shirts, with windbreakers or sweats. Others, all of them…

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400 Years in Virginia. 500 Years in Slavery.

By Stacy M. Brown, NNPA Newswire Correspondent @StacyBrownMedia In August 2018, the National Newspaper Publishers Association began a series on the transatlantic slave trade. The series started in conjunction with the annual United Nations International Day of Remembrance.  With the observance of the first African landing in America, some question whether it’s the 400th or 500th anniversary.…

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Reframing the History of Slavery in Angola and the U.S.

If the U.S. has 35,000 museums, a writer asked in 2014, why is only one about slavery? And if the wealth of this country was built on the backs of enslaved people from Africa, why has that story been vastly under-reported in our media, in our schools and in our political discourse? The first question…

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Water Mission Preparing to Provide Safe Water to Communities Impacted by Hurricane Dorian

Water Mission, a nonprofit Christian engineering organization, is mobilizing to provide safe water to the Bahamas in response to the widespread flooding and devastation caused by Hurricane Dorian.   One of the strongest storms ever recorded in the Atlantic, Hurricane Dorian brought sustained winds of over 185 miles per hour, storm surges of around 20 feet, and nearly 30 inches of rainfall to various parts of the Bahamas. Dorian made…

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Leader In Women’s Issues To Head U.N. AIDS Program

The U.N’s office on AIDS has named a longtime activist on women’s issues to head the global health agency. Ugandan humanitarian Winnie Karagwa Byanyima’s career began as a member of parliament in the National Assembly of Uganda. She became the Director of Women and Development at the African Union Commission and worked on the Protocol…

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Activist Villagers Sickened By Diamond Slag To Confront Mineowner In Court

Since the first diamonds were found in the 1930s, the villagers of Kono, in the eastern region of Sierra Leone, have seen the wealth under their feet make others rich. Instead of joy, the shiny stones have left a trail of contaminated water, pockmarked mud brick houses, and countless other indignities. Adi Kalie Bangura, a…

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National and World Leaders Convene In Virginia to Commemorate the 400th Anniversary of the First African Landing in English North America

This weekend the 2019 Commemoration of the First African Landing was hosted by Virginia’s 2019 Commemoration, American Evolution, in partnership with Fort Monroe Authority, Fort Monroe National Monument, and the City of Hampton. Thousands of people from around the world gathered at a commemorative ceremony at Point Comfort in Hampton, Virginia, which is the site where “20 and odd” enslaved African…

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Fires Engulfing West Africa Exceed Those Of Brazil

While all eyes are on the fast-moving flames in the Brazilian Amazon, satellite data is showing a record 6,902 blazes in Angola in the past 48 hours. Brazil is actually third in the world in wildfires over the last 48 hours, according to satellite data analyzed by Weather Source. Angola’s fires compare to 3,395 in…

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NAACP Observes 400th Anniversary of Slave Trade in Journey from Jamestown to Jamestown

By Stacy M. Brown, NNPA Newswire Correspondent @StacyBrownMedia On Sunday, August 18, the NAACP began a journey to honor African ancestors. Members of the storied civil rights organization and numerous guests boarded a bus from Washington, D.C. Their initial destination was Jamestown, Virginia’s Colonial National Park, where they held a prayer vigil and candle lighting…

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Republican Senate Stands in the Way of Moving America Forward

By Jesse Jackson (TriceEdneyWire.com) – Americans are disgusted that Washington has become dysfunctional, even as Americans struggle with ever greater challenges — from stagnant wages and growing inequality to catastrophic climate change to soaring health-care costs to a decrepit and dangerously aged infrastructure. President Donald Trump blames House Democrats, saying they are “getting nothing done…

Memo to Candidates: We Need a Plan for the Affordable Housing Crisis

By Marc H. Morial (TriceEdneyWire.com) – “The lack of affordable housing is perhaps the greatest challenge to successfully ending homelessness and lifting millions of people out of poverty … This administration’s callous attempts to rollback funding for affordable housing and homelessness assistance programs has left more than half a million people without shelter on any…

Debt collectors target consumers of color, people making less than $50K

By Charlene Crowell A new survey asked likely voters across the country what they thought of a proposed debt collection rule. The response was strong and broad opposition.   Proposed earlier this year by Consumer Financial Protection Bureau (CFPB) Director Kathleen Kraninger, the rule would authorize debt collectors to expand how often consumers could be contacted as well as…

Ask the Question: When Are We Going to End Child Poverty in America?

By Marian Wright Edelman “No child living in America today should have to worry about whether they’ll have a place to sleep at night or enough food to eat. But these are daily realities for the 1 in 6 poor children in this country. Children like me.” These are the words of 18-year-old Children’s Defense Fund-Minnesota…

#MeToo Doesn’t Count Against Abusive Cops?

By Richard B. Muhammad Over the last three years, there has been an explosion of stories, prosecutions and demands that men, powerful men, be held accountable for the sexual abuse of women who are in vulnerable positions, often seeking employment or job advancement. Lawmakers have lost positions, movie producers and celebrities have faced prosecution, CEO…

What Does a Just America Look Like?

By Dr. E. Faye Williams, Esq. (TriceEdneyWire.com) – Sometimes I allow myself to imagine a world with justice for all—not just in words, but by deeds. Before I go around the world with what I would like to see I want the best there is for everybody no matter where they live. Maybe to some…

Success In North Charleston Elections Requires That Voters Stay Focused!

By Barney Blakeney Too often we focus on the wrong stuff. Last week I wrote a story about candidates who have filed for municipal elections in North Charleston. Erroneously I wrote one candidate previously ran for the North Charleston mayoral position. You woulda thought I’d shot the pope, according to some Facebook critics!  It was…

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The Virtue of Being “Keen Eyed”

By Hakim Abdul-Ali Today’s message is one for the “keen eyed” among us. I don’t know if “keen eyed” is an acceptable term in the parlance of today’s Americanisms, but I don’t mind because it’s something that I, hopefully, want to use to get my point across. Speaking frankly and thinking provocatively as I sometimes do,…

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Backdoor Toms are like cockroaches

By Beverly Gadson-Birch The closer we get to the mayoral election in North Charleston, the more I am reminded of an article I wrote on “cockroaches”. Yes, sir! There are two things that really get under my skin—cockroaches and Uncle Toms. In a way, there isn’t too much difference between the two. I don’t know how y’all…

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Change Gon’ Come

By Barney Blakeney I was sitting on the steps with some of the fellas a few days after the August 8 murder of a man on the Eastside’s Hanover Street. Subject of the day – “The Eastside will change!” People have been killed at that corner before, but this is different,” said Art. “This time…

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Are You a Lion or a Hunter?

By Hakim Abdul-Ali An old Afrikan proverb states, “Until the lions write their own history, the tale of the hunt will always glorify the hunter.” That’s a remarkable truth within itself, and its a prompting wakeup call to me as it should be to the senses of any aware Afro-conscious and all other well meaning folk…

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What’s (Really) Going On?

By Hakim Abdul-Ali It’s almost the end of the summer season and the world is going through all kinds of perturbing chaotic and anarchist directions. And in the good old USA, from the monotonous and truly tedious “poly-tricks” of boring candidates running for elective offices to openly racist cries of bigoted nationalism gone amuck, we witness…

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Concerning The Snowden Community Sewer Issue

We, the Snowden Advocacy Group (SAG), are fully aware of and understand that county council has made the appropriate decision to postpone voting for approval of the ordinance regarding the community’s proposed public facility. We support the ordinance revisions to ensure that the unincorporated communities are not subject to overdevelopment and at increased risk for…

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Lowcountry Food Bank Urges South Carolina Senators to Support Efforts to Close the Summer Child Hunger Gap in South Carolina

“During the summer, a mere 17 percent of the more than 22 million children nationally who receive free or reduced-price lunch during the school year access a summer feeding program – and only 16.7 of children in South Carolina,” said Pat Walker, Lowcountry Food Bank President and CEO. “This leaves 307,109 of children in South…

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Seabrook: Trump Is A Dangerous Man

By Dr. Luther Seabrook, former educator Oh, how I yearn for the days of yesteryear when the leader of a country fronted his army and led them to war. They were real leaders. They were brave and of substance. Those days are gone, most likely forever. What do we have now? Our national leader is…

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Burn Down the Plantations (In Theory, At Least)

By D.R.E. James The biggest and baddest dudes on the corner of Aiken and Columbus Street paused their dice game as I approached. They felt compelled to inform me how crazy I was for wearing a hoodie that read, in gold stitching: “BURN DOWN THE PLANTATIONS”. These men were the biggest and the baddest on…

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Carolina Stories: "Charlie’s Place" tells the story of an African American nightclub in Myrtle Beach that was a significant stop on the Chitlin’ Circuit in the segregated South

Charleston Hanging Tree

Damon L. Fordham teaches African American history at various colleges in the Charleston area. The above story is referenced in his book “True Stories of Black South Carolina,” and he may be reached at Damonfordham@yahoo.com for speaking engagements.