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U.S. State Secretary Fired, Cutting Short Long-Awaited Africa Visit

An extended visit to Africa this month by the U.S. Secretary of State to mend fences after the President’s crude description of African and Caribbean countries was cut short this week by the dismissal of the embattled Secretary Rex Tillerson. It was the first tour of the continent by the now ex-Secretary who was the…

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French Counterterror Scheme Draws Fire in Burkina Faso

The so-called French pillar of counterterrorism in West Africa drew fire this week from Islamic extremists who struck the French Embassy in Burkina Faso and that country’s army headquarters. Seven soldiers were reported killed, as were eight attackers. Over 80 persons were injured. The incident took place in Burkina’s famed capital city of Ouagadougou just…

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New ANC President Endorses Transfer of Lands from Whites to Blacks

Barely a month into his presidency, Cyril Ramaphosa has taken sides on a hot button issue whose resolution had eluded previous leaders. He vowed to speed up the seizure of land from white owners and turn the properties over to blacks. “This original sin that was committed when our country was colonized must be resolved…

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Mugabe Lets Loose in Fury at Former Allies Who Ousted Him

After weeks of silence, former Zimbabwe president Robert Mugabe came out of his shell and delivered a furious tirade against his one-time party allies who engineered his ouster last November in an action they called “Operation Restore Legacy.” In a rare display of resentment and bitterness Mugabe called his removal by military members of his…

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Congo Sends Asylum Seekers Back To United States

Six Congolese nationals and two Zambian citizens were sent back to the U.S. after Congolese officials called their deportations “inhumane.” The six arrived last week aboard an American aircraft at Ndjili Airport, “handcuffed, chained to the ankles and hips as slaves” according to Congolese Human Rights Minister Marie Ange Mushobekwa. Further, the expelled persons were…

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Gifted Filmmaker Passes in Burkina Faso

Just days before a major retrospective of his cinematic work in Brazil, Idrissa Ouedraogo passed away in his home country of Burkina Faso. He was 64. “We talked two weeks ago,” said a grieving Janaina Oliveira of Brazil’s Center for Afro-Brazilian and Indigenous Studies in a Facebook post. “I was bringing him to Brazil. Tickets,…

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Obiang Revives Death Penalty In Bid To Save Unpopular Regime

Equatorial Guinea, under President Teodoro Obiang Nguema Mbasogo, is reviving the odious death penalty against 147 opposition activists accused of “rebellion, attacks on authority and public disorder” – a sign of deepening desperation under President Obiang. The activists include leaders of Citizens for Innovation (CI), many of whom were rounded up after a purported coup…

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Nigerian Parents Plead With Officials to Speed Up Rescue of Abducted Girls

(TriceEdneyWire.com/GIN) – Parents of young teenage girls are pleading with Nigerian officials to speed up rescue efforts for their children kidnapped by Boko Haram. “We don’t want these girls to stay long with those militants. Anything can happen to them,” said Kachalla Bukar, father of a 14 year old girl, one of 110 abducted by…

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UK Aid Group Knew of Sex Orgies By Staffers in Poor Countries – Report

Revelations that the renowned emergency aid group, Oxfam International, failed to catch rogue aid workers who admitted to hiring prostitutes for wild sex parties in Haiti and Chad, have shaken the aid community worldwide. According to a blistering new report in the Times of London, Oxfam knew of concerns about the conduct of two of…

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Ethiopian Resignation Met With Worry, Anger and State of Emergency

(TriceEdneyWire.com/GIN) – The Ethiopian government has given itself sweeping new powers – from restrictions on freedom of assembly and free expression to the deployment of combat-ready troops in civilian centers. The newly-imposed state of emergency is expected to last six months. The harsh new limits on democratic expression may have blindsided those in the international…

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March For Our Lives Follows a Venerable American Tradition of Student Social Activism

By Marc H. Morial “By our readiness to allow arms to be purchased at will and fired at whim, by allowing our movie and television screens to teach our children that the hero is one who masters the art of shooting and the technique of killing, by allowing all these developments, we have created an…

Students of Color Need to See More People of Color – That Shouldn’t Be Controversial

By Nate Bowling I spent most of my first year of grad school sitting in the back row of class with my hood up. There were nearly 40 of us in the cohort. Two were Black. My hoodie was an act of silent dissent. Today, I completely understand when my students want to do the same,…

Natalie Cofield: The Living Walker Legacy

By Julianne Malveaux (TriceEdneyWire.com) Nine years ago, when she was just 26, Natalie Cofield was looking for a mentor.  A young woman with entrepreneurship hard-wired into her spirit, she was discouraged that many did not take her seriously and disheartened that she could not make the connections she needed to further her entrepreneurial mission.  So…

‘Scared Negro Disease’ Remains

By Gary L. Flowers (TriceEdneyWire.com) – As another Black History Month has passed, I revisited the relevant speech given by former Atlanta Mayor Maynard Jackson in 2002 while speaking in Portland, Ore., titled, “The Scared Negro Disease.” Mayor Jackson’s diagnosis is seemingly cancerous in Black politicians in the Commonwealth of Virginia and in some other…

Civility on Social Media is Dead

By Bill Fletcher, Jr., NNPA Newswire Columnist I have found myself increasingly wondering whether social media, particularly Twitter and Facebook, constitutes a vehicle for civil dialogue. The number of attacks that I have either witnessed or experienced has been astounding. It has gotten to the point that I rarely respond to comments on either Twitter…

The Student Loan Debt Crisis is a Civil Rights Issue

  By Wade Henderson, Founding Board Member, Center for Responsible Lending From attacks on voting rights to police killings of unarmed civilians and growing inequities in earnings and wealth, the civil rights gains of the past six decades are facing threat after threat. But one front in the fight for full equality—meaningful access to higher…

Mood Vibrations from Within

By Hakim Abdul-Ali The total living experience is a magnificent opportunity to develop and achieve spiritual and psychological advancements for one’s soul. I firmly believe that all one can frankly say about the living experience and its mighty lessons is “it is what it is” and this rings true in more ways than one. It’s…

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Getting Older Is A Blessing, But Can Be Inconvenient

By Barney Blakeney My Aunt Sarah used to say getting old is a blessing, but it’s sometimes inconvenient. For two weeks I had planned the late Friday afternoon meeting with the folks from the Charleston Rhizome Collective. The Charleston Rhizome Collective last year received a grant from ArtPlace America which will be used to provide…

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Ungrateful White America

By Beverly Gadson-Birch   Every day in these not so “United States of America” is a struggle for Black folk.  This is worth repeating, I said “everyday” is a struggle for Black folk. Before the sun rises, folks are scheming on what they are going to do and how they are going to keep black folk…

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Delving Deep Into Black Striving

By Hakim Abdul-Ali   In Black America, as it is in the other various other Americas of modernity, there’s a persistent thought always floating around in the individual and collective mental psyches of everyone. And that’s about achieving something notable for self and to provide and take care of one’s family and loved ones. “Delving…

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Being Civil In The Face Of Incivility

By Barney Blakeney Ever had something that just sticks in your craw, a bad vibe that just won’t go away? For the past week I’ve been battling this bad feeling I got after a confrontation that’s left me re-evaluating a lot of stuff which has to do with civility, courtesy and tolerance. Last week I…

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Apathetic: If The Shoe Fits, Wear It!

By Beverly Gadson-Birch Why have pastors distanced themselves from the chaos taking place in the black community? Does anyone care about the high crime rate among young black males and the dual educational system operating right under our noses in Charleston County? Where the heck are our leaders?  Why ‘da heck are y’all so silent?…

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League of Women Voters and the 2018 CCSD School Board Elections

By Melinda Hamilton, League of Women Voters of the Charleston Area President Consider a revolution. It’s time. Start by thinking of 113,000 children, the area’s economy and one of the toughest public service jobs around. What’s the connection? The 113,000 children are students in public schools in Berkeley, Charleston and Dorchester counties. Sooner or later…

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Justice is Not Just a Strong Sentence, but Also Reform

By Marquis Jenkins I wasn’t prepared to hear the news that Michael Slager, the police officer who shot and killed Walter Scott, would have to spend 20 years in prison for depriving him of his civil rights. His sentencing in federal court last month was unusual at best. As we’ve seen time and again, even…

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Why is there a need for an alternative?

By Brother Earl Muhammad, Chairman, Lowcountry Education Many of us have read newspaper articles or assessments from prominent educators or heard via news and social media about the disparities in the distribution of resources in regards to either financial support, school supplies and learning tools or educators, from one district to another within the Charleston County…

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A Vision for a New Garrett Middle and High School

Submitted by Jesse Williams, Rep. Marvin Pendarvis & Dr. Carol Tempel When voting to build a new Center for Advanced Studies at North Charleston High School, instead of Garrett Academy of Technology, board members added that they would continue to invest in improving the quality of education at Garrett. In order to hold the school…

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Damon L. Fordham teaches African American history at various colleges in the Charleston area. The above story is referenced in his book “True Stories of Black South Carolina,” and he may be reached at Damonfordham@yahoo.com for speaking engagements.