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Students of Color Need to See More People of Color – That Shouldn’t Be Controversial

By Nate Bowling I spent most of my first year of grad school sitting in the back row of class with my hood up. There were nearly 40 of us in the cohort. Two were Black. My hoodie was an act of silent dissent. Today, I completely understand when my students want to do the same,…

Natalie Cofield: The Living Walker Legacy

By Julianne Malveaux (TriceEdneyWire.com) Nine years ago, when she was just 26, Natalie Cofield was looking for a mentor.  A young woman with entrepreneurship hard-wired into her spirit, she was discouraged that many did not take her seriously and disheartened that she could not make the connections she needed to further her entrepreneurial mission.  So…

‘Scared Negro Disease’ Remains

By Gary L. Flowers (TriceEdneyWire.com) – As another Black History Month has passed, I revisited the relevant speech given by former Atlanta Mayor Maynard Jackson in 2002 while speaking in Portland, Ore., titled, “The Scared Negro Disease.” Mayor Jackson’s diagnosis is seemingly cancerous in Black politicians in the Commonwealth of Virginia and in some other…

Civility on Social Media is Dead

By Bill Fletcher, Jr., NNPA Newswire Columnist I have found myself increasingly wondering whether social media, particularly Twitter and Facebook, constitutes a vehicle for civil dialogue. The number of attacks that I have either witnessed or experienced has been astounding. It has gotten to the point that I rarely respond to comments on either Twitter…

The Student Loan Debt Crisis is a Civil Rights Issue

  By Wade Henderson, Founding Board Member, Center for Responsible Lending From attacks on voting rights to police killings of unarmed civilians and growing inequities in earnings and wealth, the civil rights gains of the past six decades are facing threat after threat. But one front in the fight for full equality—meaningful access to higher…

Election 2018: Another Stop on the Chisholm Trail?

By Kelly Dittmar and Glynda Carr Fifty years ago, Shirley Chisholm campaigned successfully to become the first Black woman in the U.S. Congress. Four years later, she became the first woman of color and the first African American to win delegate votes at a major party presidential convention. Throughout her presidential campaign, she attracted voters…

So Much Trouble in the World

By Hakim Abdlu-Ali   The late and truly great reggae superstars Bob Marley and The Wailers once sang and recorded the intuitive song “So Much Trouble in The World” in 1979. Mr. Marley, who died in 1981, and his group from back then couldn’t have left or made a better intro to what’s happening in…

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Students Are The Losers In Adults’ Political Games

By Barney Blakeney  Over the past week, a couple of things have gone down that illustrates how the political agenda of adults continues to stifle our children and their futures. I got the call as I left Wesley UMC Sunday where young Rev. Sh’Kur Francis had given a dynamic message telling our young people to…

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An Occasion for “Thanks & Giving”

By Hakim Abdul-Ali   Around this time of the year during every November in the United States of America, families gather together on the fourth Thursday to celebrate what has become known traditionally as Thanksgiving Day. It’s an annual public and festive occurrence that brings much joy and happiness to many ethnic citizenry of our…

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The Future Lies in Land and Education

By Barney Blakeney I was watching something on television the other day when one of the characters said, “It’s the future that counts.” The comment made me reflect on what we so often think is important. It made me think about my maternal grandfather, Washington Miller. I never knew my grandfather. He died before I…

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Thanksgiving: A Happy Time For Some, Not All

By Beverly Gadson-Birch As we approach the Thanksgiving holidays, I am reminded of just how blessed I am. While I am counting my blessings, there will be those among us that are not as fortunate.  The poor, homeless and jobless will always be among us.  There will be those who feel like throwing in the…

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The American People

By Hakim Abdul-Ali   It’s now getting colder in most parts of the United States of America and all around the nation, “The American People” are being divided by more and more ethnic confusions and by additional external distrust in each other. These pervasive, internal factors are as real to some of the bald eagle’s…

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Carolina Stories: "Charlie’s Place" tells the story of an African American nightclub in Myrtle Beach that was a significant stop on the Chitlin’ Circuit in the segregated South