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Flags Fly For An Ex-President Of Nigeria ‘Too Nice’ For The Job

Former President Alhaji Shehu Usman Shagari, a devout Muslim, a former school teacher, son of a farmer, trader and herder, is being remembered as a nice man, a gentle man but not a particularly strong man. Nice, gentle and amiable – good qualities – but just short of what the opposition desired for the leader of Africa’s…

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Swahili Speakers Stunned As Disney Claims Trademark For ‘Hakuna Matata’

The once common phrase “Hakuna Matata” (No Problem!) is now off limits for African speakers of Swahili. Any commercial use of the two word expression is reserved for its new owner – the American company that produced The Lion King. That’s right – Walt Disney! The California-based company is preparing to release its remake of…

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Emeralds, Rubies Score Big Profits For Foreign Firms As African Countries Go Broke

Foreign mining companies extract more than a quarter of the world’s production of rare emeralds in Zambia yet declare losses to make themselves tax exempt. So far, charges of tax evasion filed against Kagem mine, a subsidiary of the London-listed gemstone miner Gemfields, have been unsuccessful – dismissed by the Zambian Revenue Authority. Gemfields owns…

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Sudan Leader Faces Calls For His Removal As Price Of Bread, Fuel Skyrocket

In the face of a growing movement of Sudanese opposition, protesting rising costs of bread and other essentials, security forces of the government of President Omar al-Bashir moved forcefully to end the demonstrations using tear gas, night sticks and live ammunition, according to witnesses. States of emergency and curfews have been declared in several of…

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Africa’s Blue Economy – The New Frontier?

Six counties in Kenya’s coastal region have been tagged for technical training in the blue economy – what some have called “the new frontier of the African Renaissance.” The goal is to enable young people to find jobs in the maritime industry. Kevit Desai, a Kenyan vocational training principal, says institutions of higher learning must…

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Somalia – A Military Intervention With No Purpose

Iraq, Afghanistan, Libya, Somalia, Syria, Yemen – Enough already! Unfortunately, not yet. Former Lieutenant Daniel L. Davis put it bluntly: “The purpose of the U.S. military has now become, unequivocally, to engage in permanent combat operations in dozens of countries around the world—none of which enhance America’s national security.” And yet here we are in…

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From Mauritania to Qatar: Slavery an Old Evil Takes Many Forms

By Andre Johnson, Urban News Service Incredibly in the 21st century some Africans are still working in conditions akin to slavery informally or formally in some areas of the Middle East. In Mauritania slavery, though officially illegal, remains a fact of life for an estimated 40,000 enslaved people. Like slavery in the antebellum South there is a…

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Studying in South Africa and Learning Who I Am

By Darielis Cruz, Mercy College, Dobbs Ferry, N.Y. I was born in Moca, a small city in the Dominican Republic, and today I am a 21-year-old junior at Mercy College, in New Jersey. Thanks to the Frederick Douglass Global Fellowship, I studied In South Africa last summer, and it was a transformational experience for me.…

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Voting Machines Destroyed In Fire As Congo Elections Near

“The voting machine is not a big problem,” said a confident Salomon Bagheni, a resident of the town of Beni in the Democratic Republic of Congo. “The essential thing is holding the elections on Dec. 23 to bring new leadership to this country.” By “new leadership,” Bagheni meant a new head of state after 18…

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Honoring Kwanzaa: It is time to unite and prosper!

Special from Africa House Global Kwanzaa, by definition, is a celebration held in the United States and in other nations of the Africa Diaspora in the Americas and lasts a week. The celebration honors African heritage in the African/Caribbean-American culture, and is observed from December 26 to January 1, culminating in a feast and gift-giving.…

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A Call to Conscience

By Marian Wright Edelman, Founder and President Emerita of the Children’s Defense Fund January 15th would have been Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.’s 90th birthday. How should we honor him today? Earlier this month Dr. King’s personal attorney and friend Clarence Jones convened an intergenerational, interracial, interfaith group for the launch of the Gandhi King Institute for…

Little-Known Facts about MLK

By Stacy M. Brown, NNPA Newswire Correspondent @StacyBrownMedia As the nation commemorates Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.’s holiday, some may find interesting tidbits of little-known or talked about facts and details of the slain civil rights champion. When he was born on Jan. 15, 1929, King’s name at birth was actually was Michael. His father,…

Don’t Let Predatory Tax Loans Take Your Refunds

By Charlene Crowell For many consumers, the New Year brings an annual effort to file taxes early enough to help pay off big bills, replace major appliances or tuck away a few bucks for the proverbial ‘rainy day’.  With a continuing federal shutdown, this year there are also an estimated 800,000 federal workers who have not…

Shame and Shade in Birmingham: In Praise of Angela Davis

By Julianne Malveaux (TriceEdneyWire.com) – If anyone deserves a civil rights award, Angela Davis certainly does. The activist and scholar has been on the front lines of the civil rights movement all of her life. She has been especially active in prison reform matters, but she has also been involved in other civil and human…

Overcoming Tragedy and Celebrating Life Again

By Peire Wilson, LaGuardia Community College Of the more than 330,000 U.S. students studying abroad, only 6.1 percent are African American and 10.1 percent are Latino. This is one in a series of articles by students of color who are breaking down barriers by studying abroad thanks to the Frederick Douglass Global Fellows program, which awards 10…

Economics, Not Electoral Politics, is the Key to Success

By A. Peter Bailey (TriceEdneyWire.com) – At the risk of being accused of repeating myself, I will say once again that black people who live in the continent of North America (aka USA) continue to recognize the importance of maximizing their economic potential. In 2018, as in the previous 100 or so years, we as…

Maybe I’ll Get a Life In The New Year

By Barney Blakeney Sometimes I tell myself, “Self, get a life!” As a reporter I cover so much stuff that brings me down, I have to remind myself there’s an awful lot of great stuff going’s on (as the late great comedian Bernie Mac might say). I don’t do a lot of fluff stuff. My…

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Understanding When Things Go South

By Hakim Abdul-Ali I’m writing today about a conversation I had with a white American reader of mine I ran into recently. I hadn’t seen this her in a while, but whenever we met she was always in a good spirits and seemingly not having a care in the world. On this occasion though, she…

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Reflections: “Sometimes You Have To Throw A Brick”

By Beverly Gadson-Birch Every now and then, someone will inbox me something that is nonsense or makes a lot of sense. So, follow a condensed version of a recent e-mail I received regarding a little boy that needed help. I am sure some of you have received the same e-mail. Here goes! A little boy was standing beside…

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Making Now A Brighter Day

By Hakim Abdul-Ali Womanhood is an amazing creation of the Creator Alone. If you have an ounce of insight, intelligence, admiration and respect within you, you’ll most certainly agree that women are uniquely created, and that’s why they are the mothers of “hue-manity.” I was thinking about that pristine reality recently while listening to someone…

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‘Tis The Season For Giving

By Barney Blakeney With all the stuff there is to do, I sometimes feel there ain’t enough hours in the day. Some of the stuff is things I do to earn a living. The other stuff is things I do because they need to be done – volunteer stuff. And I do a lot of…

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Who Took the Merry out of Christmas?

By Beverly Gadson-Birch As we approach the holiday season, families are looking forward to the big day—a day of festivities, lots of good foods and nostalgic fireside chats. While Christmas is really about the birthday of Christ, men have thwarted the true meaning and have turned it into an opportunity to line their pockets with…

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Domestic Violence and Domestic Abuse: The Silent Epidemic

By Linda Lucas, Charleston youth and education advocate Physical abuse and domestic violence have become all too common or “normalized” in today’s society. According to national statistics, every minute, twenty people become the victims of intimate partner violence or domestic violence. A woman is beaten every nine seconds in the United States. We have moved…

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The Misogynistic and Racist Lindsay Graham

Dear Gentlepeople Of South Carolina, I am writing because I just cannot take this racist and misogynistic political rhetoric from Lindsay Graham and the Republican Party anymore without speaking up. I am appalled that one of our own senators from our lovely state of South Carolina has decided to take a starring role in the…

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American Democracy: A View from the Mirror

By Dr. William Small, Jr. In the world of politics, both international and domestic, perhaps there is nothing more important for governments than the maintenance of the ability to self-define. This statement is very much connected to the strategy for constructing public arguments or debating, which says that once the major premise is accepted, the…

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Lesser-known broadband policy leaves rural areas out

By Johnathan Hladik, policy director, johnathanh@cfra.org, Center for Rural Affairs Connectivity is the defining aspect of our 21st century economy. Access to broadband internet offers the best in education, health care, and economic development. Unfortunately for many, the best isn’t available. More than 24 million Americans lack broadband access. This includes 31 percent of households…

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Black History Month Spotlight: Hiram Revels, the first Black Senator

Story of Gullah

Prof. Damon Fordham explains the true story of the Gullah culture in Southeastern South Carolina and Georgia