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NAACP Observes 400th Anniversary of Slave Trade in Journey from Jamestown to Jamestown

By Stacy M. Brown, NNPA Newswire Correspondent @StacyBrownMedia On Sunday, August 18, the NAACP began a journey to honor African ancestors. Members of the storied civil rights organization and numerous guests boarded a bus from Washington, D.C. Their initial destination was Jamestown, Virginia’s Colonial National Park, where they held a prayer vigil and candle lighting…

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When South Africans Declared ‘Liberation’ At Two Whites-Only Beaches

South Africa witnessed the beginning of the end of whites-only beaches thirty years ago this week after an action launched by the Anglican Archbishop Desmond Tutu. It was part of an escalating campaign to defy apartheid. Throngs of demonstrators were chased down Cape Town streets by police using whips, tear gas and water cannons spraying…

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Nigeria To Slash Funds For Essential Food Imports While Currency Crisis Looms

Hard to imagine a steaming plate of Nigerian jollof rice without the rice. Or without fish. Or wheat. Rice, fish and wheat are Nigeria’s top three food imports but foreign exchange for these staple food imports is about to end by order of President Muhammadu Buhari. Presidential spokesman Garba Shehu said Tuesday the move to…

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In Tunisia, An Openly Gay Lawyer Breaks Barriers To Run For President

In a first for Tunisia’s fledgling democracy, an openly gay candidate has thrown his hat in the ring in the race for the presidency. Mounir Baatour, a lawyer at Tunisia’s highest court, heads Shams, the country’s main LGBTQ rights group fighting for the decriminalization of homosexuality in the country. His bid for office is a…

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Zimbabweans ‘Reduced To Paupers’ Since Mugabe’s Departure

It’s hard to believe how far Zimbabwe has fallen since former President Robert Mugabe was ousted in a military-backed coup. Power cuts now leave citizens without electricity from dawn to long after dusk. Gas is too expensive so families cook on firewood. Bread is unaffordable. Drought has caused failed harvests. And rising inflation has eaten…

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He Named His Movement ‘Revolution Now’ And They Jailed Him

Omoyele Sowore, activist, founder of the anti-corruption news service “Sahara Reporters” and former presidential candidate, was not surprised when the Nigerian Security Service (DSS) forcibly entered his house early Saturday morning and arrested him. His crime? Organizing a protest against bad governance in Nigeria. The DSS arrived Aug. 3 with four trucks, seizing his phones…

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Uganda Jails Feminist Critic For ‘Cyberharassment’ Of President On Facebook

A prominent university lecturer, poet and gender rights activist has been ordered to serve nine more months in prison for the crime of criticizing President Yoweri Museveni on Facebook. The sentence outraged rights activists. Joan Nyanyuki, director for East Africa at Amnesty International said: “This verdict flies in the face of Uganda’s obligations to uphold…

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Ilhan Omar Checks Out Ghana On A ‘Back To Africa’ Tour

Chants of “Send her back!” seemed to have little impact on the firm-footed Congresswoman Ilhan Omar, one of the four young women of color in the crosshairs of the embattled U.S. president. It may have been his chant but it was her idea to join the Congressional Black Caucus and visit Ghana on the occasion…

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Nigerian Claims To Defeating Boko Haram Are ‘Far From True Reality’

In Borno State, one of Nigeria’s most conflicted states in the Northeast, few would be celebrating the anniversary of the first outbreak of violence by the Boko Haram fighters whose trail of heartbreak and tragedy weave through the region’s many small towns. It might have seemed foolhardy for a small village to take on the…

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South African Miners Win Compensation For Work-Related Lung Diseases

A Johannesburg High Court on Friday approved a groundbreaking 5 billion rand ($353 million) class action settlement on behalf of miners who contracted tuberculosis, silicosis and other chronic lung diseases through their work in the mines. The settlement follows a long legal battle by miners to be compensated for illnesses they say they contracted over…

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Disarm Hate

By Marian Wright Edelman On August 2 I wrote about the relentless scourge of gun violence and the two children killed in Gilroy, California and asked: Why does gun violence remain a uniquely horrible American epidemic and why does it go on and on and on and on? Two days later a new shooting made…

Please Bring School Supplies

By Julianne Malveaux (TriceEdneyWire.com) – The event promised to be one of those last-gasp of summer events that would raise a little money for a good cause. The young woman who called to tell me about it promised that I’d meet interesting people, enjoy excellent wines and that the cost of attending was modest. “We…

Calls for Justice for a Black Immigrant

By Dr. E. Faye Williams In an article, titled “A Clarion Call for Racial Justice Reaches the Highest Level,” Rev. Jesse Jackson brought to light “the story of an immigrant, an internationally praised economist, and a whistleblower that exposed a $16 billion fraud against American taxpayers all wrapped in one person.” The immigrant is Dr. Yonas…

Five Years After Michael Brown’s Death: Despite Visible Progress, Racial Disparities Persist in Ferguson

By Marc H. Morial (TriceEdneyWire.com) – “The city’s personal-responsibility refrain … reflects many of the same racial stereotypes found in the emails between police and court supervisors. This evidence of bias and stereotyping, together with evidence that Ferguson has long recognized but failed to correct the consistent racial disparities caused by its police and court practices,…

Will You Answer the Call for Moral Revival?

By Julianne Malveaux, NNPA Newswire Contributor I cannot overstate my tremendous admiration for Rev. William Barber. Our connection goes back to North Carolina when I was the President of Bennett College, and he led the state NAACP. His daughter, Sharrelle, graduated from Bennett in the spring before I assumed the Presidency and as student body president,…

The Significance of the 1619 Project

By Jesse Jackson (TriceEdneyWire.com) – On Sunday, the New York Times unveiled “The 1619 Project,” a journalistic series in the Sunday magazine that seeks to tell the “unvarnished truth” about slavery and its impact on America’s history. In 1619, just 12 years after the founding of the first permanent English settlement in the Americas, the…

Are You a Lion or a Hunter?

By Hakim Abdul-Ali An old Afrikan proverb states, “Until the lions write their own history, the tale of the hunt will always glorify the hunter.” That’s a remarkable truth within itself, and its a prompting wakeup call to me as it should be to the senses of any aware Afro-conscious and all other well meaning folk…

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What’s (Really) Going On?

By Hakim Abdul-Ali It’s almost the end of the summer season and the world is going through all kinds of perturbing chaotic and anarchist directions. And in the good old USA, from the monotonous and truly tedious “poly-tricks” of boring candidates running for elective offices to openly racist cries of bigoted nationalism gone amuck, we witness…

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Don’t Be Fooled By Green Grass – There Still Is A Need For Rural Missions

By Barney Blakeney I learned some time ago Rural Missions, Inc. on Johns Island was closing. Last week I learned it closed May 31. A lot of people likely don’t understand the role Rural Missions, Inc. played in our community. Unfortunately, too many people don’t even know it existed! That’s a sad commentary. I learned…

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Something That’s Worth More Than Money

By Hakim Abdul-Ali I had the opportunity to talk to a young Euro-American soul the other day. It was an absolute delight to listen to and to have spoken with him because he was fresh out of prison. This young man, all of twenty-three-years of age, humbled me because I saw that he had possessed…

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Biking In Charleston Is Deadly, Riders Can Use Some Help

By Barney Blakeney The police reports of traffic fatalities involving bicyclists have been alarming. Local police public information officers send the reports regularly, but it took awhile for me to recognize a trend. I guess that’s why it’s so important for reporters to be as objective as humanly possible. As a regular peninsula driver, cyclers…

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Talk to the Hand, Mr. President

By Beverly Gadson-Birch I have been telling y’all all along that we have a serious problem with racism in America and it accelerated once #45, President Trump, took office. President Trump ran on “Make America Great Again.” If you didn’t catch the meaning of Trump’s slogan, in the beginning, and you are still in “la, la” land,…

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Burke Supporters Respond To Todd Garrett Comments

Dear Editor: On behalf of the Burke High School Foundation, Inc. and the Friends of Burke, this is a response to the recent article in your paper by Barney Blakeney, regarding Todd Garrett’s reflections and recommendations for Burke High School. The article entitled: “School Board Member Reflects on Burke High School Graduation” seems to be…

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Will the real school board member please stand?

Dear Editor: I believe that a school board member should take time to know the legacy of any school, but particularly that of a unique school of immense historical importance to the African-American community. Persons who value and provide investments in heritage, people and pride, make our city worthy of its many accolades. I have…

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Post Independence Day Reflections

By Dr. William Small, Jr. What does one write about on the fourth of July when the script remains the same and only the title changed? I came to the computer to write an essay for this national holiday. I cannot think long about the fourth of July without quickly drifting into a prideful reconnection…

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Concerning The Snowden Community Sewer Issue

We, the Snowden Advocacy Group (SAG), are fully aware of and understand that county council has made the appropriate decision to postpone voting for approval of the ordinance regarding the community’s proposed public facility. We support the ordinance revisions to ensure that the unincorporated communities are not subject to overdevelopment and at increased risk for…

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Carolina Stories: "Charlie’s Place" tells the story of an African American nightclub in Myrtle Beach that was a significant stop on the Chitlin’ Circuit in the segregated South

Story of Gullah

Prof. Damon Fordham explains the true story of the Gullah culture in Southeastern South Carolina and Georgia