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Journalists Trek to Haiti for Cultural Tour

(TriceEdneyWire.com) – A group of African-American multi-media journalists and other professionals are on a cultural tour in Haiti this week. The nine-member group arrived in Port-au-Prince on Sunday, Oct. 28. The tour will include Port-au-Prince, which was hit with the catastrophic 7.0 magnitude earthquake which killed more than 100,000 in January 2010 and Gonaives which…

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Aging Autocrat Whips Opposition and Claims Victory in a Disputed Poll

Leaders of the opposition were roundly defeated in this month’s national elections that gave the six term incumbent President Paul Biya a new seven year term. The 85 year old chief of state was returned to power amidst a deepening split along linguistic lines, a quarter of a million of Cameroonians living in exile, and…

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“Cores Pretas” Highlights the Struggles of Black Women in Brazil

By Stacy M. Brown, NNPA Newswire Correspondent @StacyBrownMedia Mayara Silva did 20 interviews last year. The 26-year-old has worked since the age of 16, has been a lawyer for two years, and is finishing her first postgraduate course and has already started the second one, according to the blog, BlackWomenofBrazil, which is dedicated to highlighting…

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Over 200,000 Congolese Driven Out Of Angola In Anti-Smuggling Row

Under the name “Operation Transparency’, Angolan officials in less than a month evicted between 200- and 400,000 migrants, mostly Congolese from the neighboring Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC), claiming the migrants were plundering Angola’s resources – specifically diamonds. The charges were refuted by the United Nations refugee agency (UNHCR) which said the Congolese had been…

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South African Student Makes History by Using Official Language in Thesis

By Stacy M. Brown,NNPA Newswire Correspondent @StacyBrownMedia When the time arrived for Nompumelelo Kapa to write her doctoral thesis at the University of Fort Hare in Eastern Cape, South Africa, she likely responded: Masambe – a word that, when translated in English, means “Let’s Go” in the original South African language of isiXhosa. The married…

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Nobel Prize Winner Dr. Denis Mukwege Inspired by the Women He Treats

By Stacy M. Brown, NNPA Newswire Correspondent @StacyBrownMedia Having treated more than 50,000 rape victims at Panzi Hospital in the Democratic Republic of Congo, Dr. Denis Mukwege is known as “the man who mends women.” “The strength of the women I have been treating for more than two decades is what inspires me,” the newly-minted…

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Zimbabwe Leaders Urge Calm As Economy Veers Toward Collapse

Citing “these difficult times,” Kentucky Fried Chicken has closed its doors, prices are soaring, bread shelves are empty and fear is growing that an economic collapse is bearing down on a fragile population that was so full of hope not long ago. Under cover of night, Zimbabwe streets fill with street vendors, supplying necessities that…

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Mall for Africa Sells U.S. Cars to Customers in Nigeria

By Stacy M. Brown,NNPA Newswire Correspondent @StacyBrownMedia Mall for Africa, an award-winning patented e-commerce platform, announced that it will add cars from the United States the long list of items that it sells. The company said it will sell American made cars to its customers in Nigeria, effective immediately, with plans to expand to 16…

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Ghana Proclaims Year of Return to African Descendants

By Lauren Poteat, NNPA Washington Correspondent Paying homage to the past and a hope to a brighter future, 2019 will officially mark the 400-year anniversary since the arrival of the first enslaved Africans to English North America in 1619. In remembrance of the dark history and the celebration of the Black American’s triumph in the…

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Young Medical Worker Executed By Boko Haram Caliphate

“We urge you: spare and release these women,” begged Patricia Danzi, director of the International Committee of the Red Cross in Africa. .. “Like all those abducted, they are not part of any fight.” “They are daughters and sisters, one is a mother — women with their futures ahead of them, children to raise, and…

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The Shirley Chisholm Legacy

By Yolanda Caraway, Leah Daughtry, Minyon Moore, Co-Authors of For Colored Girls Who Have Considered Politics November 5th marked the historic 50th Anniversary of the first African American woman elected to the U.S. Congress, Rep. Shirley Chisholm. This important milestone marks a watershed moment in American politics for black women, to emerge and take their rightful…

The Real Deal in Politics

By A. Peter Bailey (TriceEdneyWire.com) – With the midterm elections November 6, we Black folks should pay serious attention to observations made by Dr. William Scarborough, president of Wilberforce University and by Professor Harold Cruse in his book, “Plural but Equal”. In his February 11, 1899 speech at a Lincoln Day celebration, Dr. Scarborough included…

Anatomy of a Theft

By Dr. E. Faye Williams, President of the National Congress of Black Women (TriceEdneyWire.com) – One of the simplest crimes for police to analyze is the basic crime of theft. It’s always accompanied by the motive of profit or gain. In other words, someone else possesses something that would bring another person a benefit and…

I Will Vote! – Choosing NOT to Vote Still Impacts You

By Jeffrey L. Boney, NNPA Political Analyst “I Will Vote!” That is such an empowering statement, when you think about it, especially considering how important voting is for Black people at this critical time in this country. The voting rights of Blacks are being targeted and threatened every day and those threats have become extremely…

School Grading Practices Are Inaccurate and Inequitable to Black Children

By Joe Feldman The battle for equity in our schools is not only a fight to guarantee access to great teaching and high-quality learning environments, programs, and materials. The battle for equity also includes the practices and policies that teachers use to describe students’ success or failure in school. An issue often overlooked, grading, is…

Done to us Not With Us: Calling for New Voices

By Khalilah Long, Communications Manager, UNCF Parents play critical roles in their child’s achievement from kindergarten through high school graduation. Parent advocacy has proven to have positive implications on student educational success. But who advocates for and supports parents and caregivers? In African American households, oftentimes, clergy or other prominent community leaders are the galvanizing…

Do The Work, Pay Attention Before Elections!

By Barney Blakeney   We’re down to the wire with just under two weeks before the 2018 general elections and I’m still undecided about a lot of the races. People keep telling us we must be informed voters, but it’s so hard getting good information. It’s a lot of work! I guess there’s only one…

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2018 Midterms: The Hope is in the Vote!

By Beverly Gadson-Birch   This is not one of those git down, sit down quizzical kind of articles you have grown accustomed to over the years. Sometimes we just need to talk about issues as they impact US. And no, US means you and me, African Americans, not the United States; but, I am sure…

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For the Love of Seeking Knowledge

By Hakim Abdul-Ali  I’m a self-professed lover of collecting books and other items. I always have been that way, and I’ll probably will remain that way until the day I take my last breath. While on that rather personal theme of expression, I’m thinking about something that I’d like to share with you today about…

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Living The Best Life Ain’t Going Back and Forth

By Barney Blakeney For the past few days I’ve been bobbing my head to the beat of a tune I hear on the radio by Lil Duval, Snoop Dogg and Ball Greezy titled ‘Smile (Living My Best Life)’. I got hooked on the beat and I like me some Snoop Doggy Dogg! But I don’t…

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The Wonder of It All

By Hakim Abdul-Ali In many of my articles that I’ve written recently I tend to reflect upon life in all of its many wondrous panoramas. I feel extremely blessed to be able to say that with a total and an unbiased spiritual sense of awareness, especially in light of the way many folk in today’s…

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Community in Uproar Over Sexual Abuse Case at Dunston Elementary School & Disparities in the Treatment of Black and Hispanic Students

By Beverly Gadson-Birch On Tuesday, October 16, a group led by Elder James Johnson, State Director, SC National Action Network; Pastor Thomas Dixon, The Coalition; Myrtice Brown, Interdenomination Ministers Alliance, Community Activists and Concerned Citizens held a Press Conference in front of the School District Office at 75 Calhoun Street. The group addressed serious educational…

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Join the League of Women Voters of the Charleston Area on National Voter Registration Day

September 25, 2018, the League of Women Voters of the Charleston Area will celebrate National Voter Registration Day with a special event at Stratford High School, 951 Crowfield Blvd., Goose Creek. Community leaders will speak about the importance of the vote. Election information will be available, including opportunities for students and staff to register on-site.…

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How Jerk Chicken Made Me Rethink Charleston’s Plantation Culture

By D.R.E. James Cimarrones or maroons who escaped plantations and hid out from their Spanish and English captors in the nooks and crannies of Jamaica’s lush Blue Mountains mingled with the indigenous Taino people. Cultural exchanges between the two people ensued. The maroons adopted the Taino’s culinary wisdom like smoking wild hogs flavored with scotch…

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Let’s Make IAAM A Legitimate Museum

The fundraising success of the International African American Museum does not necessarily assure its ultimate triumph as an uplifting educational and cultural institution.    As preeminent historian Dr. Carter G. Woodson eloquently stated in his classic work The Mis-Education of the Negro (1933), “the mere imparting of information is not education.”; as we easily note…

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Poor People For Justice Get Shut Out

I previously said that the mayoral administration, who at that time was led by Joseph P. Riley, did not work for the poor people of Charleston. I stated that they worked for the rich, and in saying that, I got into disfavor with the city. Well 12 years later, the City Council and our new…

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From the Sea to the Table: Episode 1 - Ray DeeZy links up with Chef George in North Charleston to learn about Gullah Cuisine, while making friend cabbage, rice, shrimp, and clams

Story of Gullah

Prof. Damon Fordham explains the true story of the Gullah culture in Southeastern South Carolina and Georgia