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Nigerian Nun Shames Catholic Church for Silence on Sex Abuse

A Nigerian nun faced a Vatican summit on sexual abuse in the Church and delivered a stinging indictment to stone-faced church leaders who failed to take action against abusers. It was the third day of the Vatican summit. Sister Veronica Openibo did not mince words. A member of the Society of the Holy Child Jesus,…

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Eulogies Flow For A Golden Voice That Challenged Apartheid

A baobab tree has fallen with the passing of a one-of-a-kind musician. Those were the words spoken of the legendary Mama Dorothy Masuka by South African Arts and Culture Minister Nathi Mthethwa. She was hailed alongside her friend, the late veteran star Miriam Makeba, for using music to highlight the plight of South Africans during…

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Discovering the Excellence Within: Realizing My Greatness in South Africa

By Jorian Reeves, Xavier University, Louisiana’s College of Pharmacy I had my first taste of global cultural learning in 2015 when I traveled to Qatar at the age of 14 for a week-long Arabic debate competition. Two years earlier, in seventh grade, I had started taking Arabic classes at Lindbolm Math and Science Academy, a…

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Voters Turned Back As Nigeria Cancels National Polls

Late breaking news. Voting for the nation’s next president has been called off for today. Thanks for coming. Stay tuned for further announcements. Not the kind of message one would expect from the superpower of Africa. But indeed, five hours before polls were set to open on Saturday, Nigeria’s electoral commission announced that unspecified “challenges”…

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Gruesome Torture Of African Villagers For ‘Blood Rubies’ Worn By Stars

A British mining company will pay over $7 million to settle allegations of torture and murder at ruby mines in the northeast of Mozambique. The red stones, worth millions, have been worn by international actresses Mila Kunis, Bel Powley, and Sophie Cookson, among others. The settlement covers the murder of at least 18 people allegedly…

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State Department Raises Travel Warning Over Haiti Unrest

Demonstrators are filling the streets of downtown Port au Prince in Haiti as anger and frustration over government mismanagement, corruption and grinding poverty boils over. Protestors are now demanding the resignation of Haitian President Jovenel Moise over the disappearance of nearly $2 billion for a program earmarked for the poor. The Venezuelan PetroCaribe Discount Oil…

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Baptist Hill Teams Up with Constituent Board Member to Support Children in Liberia

Open lines of communication between a Constituent Board member and a school principal led to hundreds of flip-flops being delivered to children in Liberia. Earlier this winter, Dr. Helen Frazier, who serves on the Constituent District 23 Board of Trustees, spoke with Baptist Hill Middle High School’s principal, Vanessa Brown, about an upcoming trip to…

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Egypt President El-Sisi Takes Up African Union Chairmanship

Rwandan President Paul Kagame has turned over the leadership of the 55-member African Union to Abdel-Fattah el-Sissi, President of Egypt, at its 32nd ordinary session in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia. During his tenure, el-Sissi is expected to concentrate on security and financial reform, but with no great plans to strengthen the AU’s multilateral powers. Instead, the…

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There’s an uprising going on in the Sudan!

By Bill Fletcher, Jr., NNPA Newswire Contributor Over the last fifteen years, what we have mainly heard about the Sudan—what had been the largest nation-state in Africa—revolved around the secessionist movement in what is now known as the South Sudan, and the genocide being carried out by the Sudanese government against the people of the…

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African Free Trade Agreement Nears Completion

By Stacy M. Brown, NNPA Newswire Correspondent @StacyBrownMedia Four hundred years after the first Africans were kidnapped and brought to the United States and 135 years after the infamous Berlin Conference divided Africa into 55 separate countries, heads of state from the continent are on the verge of a historic free trade agreement. The African…

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Continued Cruel Threats to Hungry Families and Children

By Marian Wright Edelman Once again children and families are under attack. After failing in past efforts to slash funding for the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP, also known as food stamps), the Trump administration is taking a new approach to crippling the program millions of families in the United States depend on to survive and…

African American Heart Health Is Vital

By Dr. Anisa Shomo, NNPA Newswire Contributor Last month, February 2019, was not only Black History Month, it was also Heart Health Awareness Month per the American Heart Association. Heart disease is the number one killer of men and women in the United States. Generally, heart disease is considered a man’s disease, but more Black…

Blacks on White Privilege

By Dr. E. Faye Williams (TriceEdneyWire.com) – For many years many Black people have been denied opportunities for no reason other than the color of their skin. I’ve been guilty like many others who said, “It must be nice to have white privilege!” Now, I’m not so sure. I’d rather not have anybody knocking on…

The Black Women Jailed for ‘Stealing’ an Education

By Stacy M. Brown, NNPA Newswire Correspondent @StacyBrownMedia Actress Lori Loughlin was taken into custody by the FBI Wednesday in Los Angeles after she, fellow movie star Felicity Huffman and 48 others were charged in a $25 million college admissions scam that ABC News said has prompted repercussions from Hollywood to the boardrooms of major corporations. A…

Jobs Report Shows What ‘African Americans Have to Lose’ Under Trump

By Stacy M. Brown, NNPA Newswire Correspondent @StacyBrownMedia The latest report from the U.S. Labor Department has provided still another answer to the infamous question of “What the hell do [African Americans] have to lose?” That question, of course, was posed by Donald Trump during his successful run for president in 2016. With racial tensions,…

Millennials must answer ‘How will you lead?’

By John Semien, Special from the New Tri-State Defender “Nobody can do this for us but us.” To Dr. Wes Bellamy, a city councilman from Charlottsville, Va., that statement by Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. is the rendezvous point for picking up where King left off in the fight for social justice for all. “We are in…

Are We Still Interlopers in This Country?

By Hakim Abdul-Ali By the time that you’ll read this, the yearly February Black History Month’s annual observances will be coming to its conclusion in the United States of America. To many aware folk of color that’s an inconsiderate slight because, to them, the universal recognition and study of all Afrikan folk’s cultural struggles and…

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Time To Re-Write Black History

By Beverly Gadson-Birch As Black History Month comes to an end, let’s not forget to continue teaching, learning and sharing information on Black achievements. It is going to take more than one month to undo the distorted history and/or misinformation filtered down through generations. Students who are now adults are passing the same distorted history down to…

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There Are No Stupid Questions

By Barney Blakeney Last week I got a list of 21 questions a group advocating for more input into the development of the International African American Museum feels should be asked of those putting the thing together. They’re some heavy questions – complicated and multi-layered – but they’re questions I think should be answered. For…

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With No Apologies Necessary

By Hakim Abdul-Ali Today’s article, “With No Apologies Necessary,” is one that, hopefully, will make you think about a lot of things if you’re a person of color. It’s about family unity, awareness and some other topical issues, and how they don’t seem to grab as much provocative attention today in this, oftentimes, contradictory and…

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Black History: Little Known Fact History

By Beverly Gadson-Birch As we continue to recognize the history of Black achievements, I promised to share more fact history from “The Afro-American in United States History” copyrighted in 1969 and written by Benjamin DaSilva, Milton Finkelstein and Arlene Loshin.  A second edition came out in 1972. Know your rights!! “The United States was set…

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America and Drug Addiction In Our Community

By Barney Blakeney For the past few years I’ve had mixed emotions about the response our society is making in the wake of the opioid epidemic. I’d be less than honest if I said I don’t have some consternation about America’s sense of urgency in responding to the consequences of opioid addiction in recent years…

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Tri-County Cradle to Career Collaborative recommends changes to innovative schools, teacher salary, early childhood

Tri-County Cradle to Career Collaborative announced the first of what will likely be a series of actions needed to support the reformation of public education in the tri-county region and across the state. Education attainment in the region has shown almost no progress over the past six years, and TCCC has expanded its advocacy work…

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Toddler Trump Needs A Timeout In The Oval Office

President Trump announced an end to the government shutdown on January 25. Is it a real deal to reopen the federal government or another tactic of the power-grabbing politician? Is Trump backing down or bamboozling Congress again? Is this a permanent or temporary solution? The elephant and donkey games continue. Trump is using his demand…

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50 Years Later, A Look Back at Dr. King’s Demands for Food Justice

The Poor People’s March on Washington in May of 1968, planned by Dr. Martin Luther King and the Southern Christian Leadership Conference, drew attention to the deep economic injustices that plagued communities of color despite civil rights advances, and presented Congress with an economic bill of rights. But before the march, Reverend Ralph Abernathy visited the US Department…

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Caucasians can learn from reading Black newspapers

  By Melissa Martin, Ph.D In the United States today, many cities print newspapers in diverse languages for other racial and ethnic groups. Reading news stories written by journalists, reporters, and columnists from your own background gives opportunity to view events through your own cultural lens. National Newspapers Publishers Association (NNPA) is a trade association…

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National Poetry Month Spotlight - The Revolution Will Not Be Televised: Gil Scott Heron

Story of Gullah

Prof. Damon Fordham explains the true story of the Gullah culture in Southeastern South Carolina and Georgia