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African Who Saved Child From Fall Gets French Citizenship

A migrant from Mali who scrambled up the side of a building to save a 4 year old child dangling from a fifth floor balcony was thanked this week by President Emmanuel Macron and offered citizenship. Mamoudou Gassama had been living without papers in France when the incident took place. “You have become an example…

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Human Rights Trampled in Burundi, Rights Groups Charge

A president who once banned the popular pastime of jogging now aims to rewrite the nation’s laws and rule the nation of Burundi until 2034. A referendum is scheduled to take place this week that would give President Pierre Nkunrunziza two more terms of 7 years each. President Nkurunziza, 54, has strong support from his…

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Court Denies Nigerian Fishermen ‘Access To Justice’, Rights Groups Say

A coalition of human rights, environmental and development groups from the four corners of the world is challenging a UK appeals court ruling that lets UK-headquartered parent companies escape liability when people in poor countries are harmed by their affiliates. The ruling stems from a lawsuit by the Ogale people in Nigeria against Royal Dutch…

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Burundi Vote Could Undo Delicate Hutu-Tutsi Balance

As U.S. President Trump unravels carefully crafted legislation at home, the newly-passed referendum in Burundi may unravel a balance of power between Hutus and Tutsis, worrying some experts in diplomacy. The finely-tuned Hutu-Tutsi ethnic balance, defined in the 2000 Arusha agreement, helped end Burundi’s civil war, say policy strategists at the International Crisis Group. Under…

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Women’s Group Plead For Clemency For Sudanese Teen Sentenced To Hang

A Sudanese court has upheld a judgment of execution for a teenage girl who fought off the forcible sexual advances of her arranged-marriage husband, leading to his death. Noura Hussein has been imprisoned in Omdurman, Sudan, since the murder of the man she was forced to marry, who she says raped her as his relatives…

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Experimental Drug Gets Green Light For New Ebola Outbreak

The Ebola virus, which took thousands of lives in West Africa, has resurfaced in central Africa. This time, health officials are ready to put an experimental drug to the test. The outbreak, which has caused at least 19 deaths and 39 confirmed and suspected cases, was reported in the Democratic Republic of the Congo’s (DRC)…

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Did Trump Meet His Match in President of Nigeria?

Try as he might, President Trump couldn’t land a deal with Nigerian leader Muhammadu Buhari at their tête-à-tête in Washington last month. Deploying his usual tough talk on trade, the U.S. president was shooting for a deal that would open the doors to U.S. farm products by “ripping down” Nigerian trade barriers that protect the…

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Zimbabwean Musician Returns From Exile

After 14 long years in the U.S. state of Oregon, singer, composer and bandleader Thomas Mapfumo has come home to Zimbabwe. His recent performance, for some 20,000 ticket holders at the open-air Glamis Arena, only slowed down as the sun began to rise. “I thought maybe I wasn’t going to be able to come back…

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A Call For Justice For African Children

Children are very much on the political and public agenda across Africa today. The African Union has adopted a charter to protect them and a mechanism to hold governments accountable for the fulfillment of their rights. Even so, the reality on the ground is somber and sobering. The number of child prisoners continent wide is…

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Debate Heats Over South African White Privilege

Members of the opposition Democratic Alliance (DA) are reportedly squabbling over a casual remark by the head of the party, Mmusi Maimane, who observed that white privilege and black poverty were critical issues that needed to be addressed. “I firmly stand by comments I made on Freedom Day,” Maimane tweeted on Sunday. “South Africa remains…

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Black Women Are Changing the Tide of American Politics

By Jeffrey L. Boney, NNPA Newswire Contributor Last week, the world witnessed something that had never been done before in the history of politics in the United States. Not only did Democratic voters in Georgia elect a 44-year-old African American candidate as the first-ever Black gubernatorial nominee in the state, they also made history by…

Stacey Abrams – Standing on Strong Shoulders

By Julianne Malveaux (TriceEdneyWire.com) – I am among the millions who are ecstatic that Stacey Abrams won the Democratic nomination for governor in Georgia. She didn’t just win, she rocked, clobbering her opponent, Stacey Evans, by over 50 percentage points – Abrams had 76 percent of the 533,450 votes cast in the Democratic primary. Of…

Our Nation’s Top Teachers Disagree with Ed Sec Devos on School Choice

By Dr. Elizabeth Primas, Program Manager, NNPA/ESSA Public Awareness Campaign When the best educators in America traveled to Washington, D.C. for a series of events celebrating innovation in the classroom and to share best practices in K-12 education, they let officials at the Department of Education and the White House know exactly how they felt…

Fear Can Immobilize You

By Dr. E. Faye Williams, Esq. (TriceEdneyWire.com) – Every time we turn on television, we hear “Breaking News” and it’s always something worse than the last news. It’s beginning to make many fearful of what could possibly be next. Even former Secretary of State Rex Tillerson ventured out this week to say, “Without personal honor there…

Trump and the Lies That Lead to War

By Dr. Wilmer J. Leon, III In his “Speech on the Iran Nuclear Deal,” on May 8, 2018 President Trump said, “In theory, the so-called ‘Iran deal’ was supposed to protect the United States and our allies from the lunacy of an Iranian nuclear bomb.” He went on to say, “In fact, the deal allowed…

Golfing While Black: Grandview Golf Club Asks Five Black Women to Leave the Club for Golfing Too Slow

By Sandra Thompson, Esq., President, NAACP York County, Pa. Branch On Saturday, April 21, 2018, I woke up excited, anticipating a round of golf at Grandview Golf Club in York, Pa. I was going to play with four ladies from “Sisters in the Fairway” (SITF), a group of about 15 professional, predominantly African American women…

Racism, Spirituality and Life’s Tests

By Hakim Abdul-Ali Living and traveling through this maze of modern happenings we call the life experiences can get a little edgy at times. You probably don’t need me to tell you that living a life in a world of racism, bigotry and intolerance should have taught you a thing or two by now. If…

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“Prosperity” – Say What?

By Barney Blakeney   I read with a giggle a recent news report of Charleston and North Charleston being among the nation’s most prosperous cities. A lot of folks here are enjoying ‘the good life’. I’m one of ‘em. For me, life is good. I ain’t got no money, but I’ve learned one can’t measure…

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Making America “Hue-manly” Great

By Hakim Abdul-Ali   Everyone in existence is different in more ways than we can sometimes count. There’s beauty in diversity but you first have to learn to love yourself. Most of us don’t think alike, nor do we agree on most issues be they political, social, diet, religious persuasions, etc. And even with those…

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Naval Hospital Debacle: Do Not Be Hoodwinked!

By Beverly Gadson-Birch   I try not to bother trouble unless trouble bothers me.  So, trouble bothered me last week after reading Brian Hicks’ article in the Post and Courier regarding the old Naval Hospital. This is not the first time I have tackled this issue. It troubles me that taxpayers are willing to allow…

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64 Years After Ruling Segregated Schools Unlawful, But Still Exist

By Barney Blakeney I’ve never been good at remembering special dates – Memorial Day, my girl’s birthday –most dates besides Christmas, Fourth of July and Thanksgiving get past me. So when Democratic gubernatorial candidate Phil Noble’s press coordinator on May 17 called me about a press conference to discuss he and running mate Dr. Gloria…

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Talking Real About Black Concerns

By Hakim Abdul-Ali    I was talking to a young and very aware young Afrikan-American brother the other day about what’s going on in Black society today. That was a rather intriguingly vague topic, but it’s one that made me think deeply about it before I engaged in dialogue with this soon-to- be rising college…

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Celebration or Ritual?

  By Dr. William Small, Jr. The practice of effectively organizing and celebrating the importance of events is validated by its existence in all cultures. Celebrations on their face speak to values which define and affirm a people. Christmas, Columbus Day, the Fourth of July, for example all say something about the soul and character…

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A Public Call for School Board Members to Dismantle Racial Barriers in Education

The status of public education in Charleston County has been the subject of intense though warranted scrutiny by a high-profile report, “The State of Racial Disparities in Charleston County, South Carolina 2000-2015.” Dr. Stacey Patton, a professor of History and Journalism at Morgan State University and acclaimed author, published the report in consultation with the…

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The Fine Line

  By D.R.E. James I imagine my demeanor to be something like Drake’s on the cover of his magnum opus Take Care. Head down, by his lonesome in the corner of Joso’s dining room. Except at Henrietta’s, I’m not in Toronto. I’m on the wickered, patioed Parisian-feeling patio of Henrietta’s. My waiter greets me; his…

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Fairness

Right and wrong are words that are not applicable to today’s society. We live from day to day in complete denial about what these words really mean. Today as I sat in church I was given a new word: Fair. I came home and referred to Webster for the clear definition of fair:  free from…

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Discussion With The Chronicle

“The Chronicle” is a revered institution in the Charleston Black community, with loyal readers and subscribers of all ethnicities. As the Palmetto state’s recognized leader in African-American news coverage for more than forty-four years, “The Chronicle” has successfully reported on, gathered, recorded, told and printed about the penetrating known and invisible stories of the Black experience, both locally and nationally, with unquestioned verve and tenacity.

Chronicle staffers Barney Blakeney, Hakim Abdul-Ali and Damion Smalls sat on the panel