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Ugandan TV Host Wins Coveted Prize For Investigative Journalism 

Ugandan investigative reporter and news anchor Solomon Serwanjja is the 2019 winner of the Komla Dumor award. It goes to a journalist committed to changing the narrative about Africa. Serwanjja, a presenter at Uganda’s NBS TV, hosts one of the channel’s prime-time shows. He has also produced award-winning reports, including one for BBC’s Africa Eye…

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Profs Caught Seeking Sexual Favors In Undercover Sting At Top African Schools

A year-long investigation into sexual harassment by professors at the University of Lagos and the University of Ghana has produced evidence of a tolerated practice of “sex for grades” at the two top schools. Shocking tapes of university profs brazenly propositioning young women who had come seeking admission to classes or financial aid showed their…

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Advocates for Biafra and Journalists Against Corruption Face Gov’t Crackdown

The war may be over in a place called Biafra – a region of states in the southern part of Nigeria – but it remains a flashpoint for ethnic tensions that simmer just below the surface. This September, the leader of the Indigenous People of Biafra (IPOB), announced a meeting with world leaders at the…

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In The Grip Of A Nationwide Drought, Zimbabwe Faces A National Disaster

In a new low water mark for Zimbabwe’s troubled economy, two million people in Zimbabwe’s capital have now been left without water after the government ran out of foreign currency to pay for imported water treatment chemicals. Zimbabwe’s capital city shut its main water works on Monday, potentially leaving the city dry and raising the…

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Doctors’ Group Slams World Health Body For Rationing Ebola Meds

Congolese people seeking a vaccine against the Ebola epidemic could be getting the runaround by the World Health Organization (WHO) which stands accused of rationing the distribution of a drug deemed highly effective against the deadly disease. The humanitarian medical group Doctors Without Borders (MSF) criticized the pace of ongoing inoculations “too slow” and “largely…

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African Vacation Spots Fear Chaos After UK Travel Group Folds

Sunbathers snoozing away the last days of summer awoke to a cold water bath of reality when news of the bankruptcy filing by the famed Thomas Cook travel group hit the airwaves, leaving many with no way home. With its profits decimated by online travel services such as Expedia, Priceline and Hotel.com, the 178-year old…

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Thousands Join In Global Climate Justice Strike

Millions of young climate activists are declaring “enough is enough” to the use of fossil fuels that are superheating our planet and unleashing floods, hurricanes and droughts unlike any we’ve seen before. On Friday, a Global Climate Strike led by school children and adults marched and rallied in 185 countries around the world—making it the…

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Hampton University to Offer Free Enrollment, Room & Board to University of the Bahamas Students Displaced by Hurricane Dorian

In an effort to help those students and families affected by Hurricane Dorian, Hampton University is entering into an agreement with the University of the Bahamas-North to allow students who have been displaced by the hurricane to continue their education on HU’s campus. “I think this agreement is something that can be helpful to a…

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Affluent Society Blamed For Speed Up In Removal Of Kenyan Forest

The palm oil industry is growing by leaps and bounds around the globe but its overnight success is worrying environmentalists. An estimated 7.5 million acres of land traditionally used or inhabited by local communities has been acquired by palm oil companies, according to GRAIN, a nonprofit that supports small farmers. In the past decade, politicians…

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Silicon Valley African Film Festival celebrates its 10th anniversary with 85 films from 35 countries

The 10th Annual Silicon Valley African Film Festival (SVAFF) will be held at the Historic Hoover Theatre in San Jose from Friday, October 4 through Sunday, October 6, 2019. The annual showcase includes a mix of feature films, shorts, documentaries and animations from seasoned and emerging African filmmakers. SVAFF celebrates its tenth anniversary with a…

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Deadly and dangerous — Healthcare in America

By Ray Curry, Secretary-Treasurer, UAW Laughter is the Best Medicine, says the Reader’s Digest version of America. But, not when it’s the only medicine, responds the America that far too many have known and continue to know. Not when the United States alone is one of the world’s top 33 most developed countries that does not have…

Opinion Polls vs. Debates — Democrats in Battle Over Voter Influence

By Stacy M. Brown, NNPA Newswire Correspondent @StacyBrownMedia The symbiotic nature of debates and public opinion polls was on full display this week in Ohio, stated Krista Jenkins, a political science professor at Farleigh Dickinson University and the school’s poll director. “[Former Vice President Joe] Biden stood for incrementalism, and those who flanked him – Sens.…

The Urban League Movement Has Had Few Greater Champions in Congress than Elijah Cummings

By Marc Morial (TriceEdneyWire.com) – “Steely yet compassionate, principled yet open to new perspectives, Chairman Cummings remained steadfast in his pursuit of truth, justice, and reconciliation. It’s a tribute to his native Baltimore that one of its own brought such character, tact, and resolve into the halls of power every day. And true to the…

Fannie Lou Hamer Died of Untreated Breast Cancer

By Julianne Malveaux (TriceEdneyWire.com) – October is Breast Cancer Awareness Month, and the proliferation of pink ribbons is about to start. Predatory capitalists will make breast cancer their cause, producing pink t-shirts, pocketbooks, everything. It’s a mixed blessing, this awareness, because too many will make this both a marketing and a profit-making opportunity, while others…

Black Representation and Appearance in Japanese Pop Culture

By Noah Washington, NNPA Newswire Pop Culture Contributor With the release of Netflix’s “Cannon Busters,” we go back to the age-old conversation of representation of African Americans in anime. The most well-known characters in Japanese pop culture have often been represented with European features and fairer skin tones such as Naruto, Ichigo, Luffy, or Spike…

Trump’s favorite dictator

By Bill Fletcher, Jr., NNPA Newswire Contributor Egypt, which along with Tunisia was at the heart of the 2011-2012 “Arab Spring”, is in the midst of a new upsurge. It is premature to call it an uprising, but something is afoot in Egypt in opposition to the repression and corruption of the el-Sisi regime. Abdel…

The Other Side of Political Imagination

By Hakim Abdul-Ali Today’s message is inspired by a marvelous time I had with a very politically connected brother of color last week. We broke bread together at new local eatery and shared an enlightening evening rapping about everything from systematic “poly tricks” to ethnic pride to, well, you name it. One thing we most…

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“Today Was A Good Day”

By Barney Blakeney I tend to relate memories to music. Songs trigger memories for me – where I was, what I was doing, how I felt. Last Saturday made me think of Ice Cube’s “Today Was A Good Day”. The lyrics, which I sometimes think are stupid, are set to the tune of The Isley…

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Know Thyself and Be Proud

By Hakim Abdul-Ali I had a very interesting rap with a dark complexioned local young person of color last week who told me that she was not Black at all. She initially claimed to be of no specific ethnic lineage whatsoever and that, quite frankly, floored me. Unfortunately, that sentiment seems to be spreading among many…

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Turning The Ship

By Barney Blakeney I attended the 102th Annual NAACP Freedom Fund Banquet Sept. 21. A friend made it possible. The tickets were $150 bucks. That’s another story. The house was packed – for those who could afford it, the event was well worth the price of the ticket. I left having learned a couple of…

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Vote: Time For Major Changes

By Beverly Gadson-Birch I founded a program back in the early 80’s, along with six volunteers, called Scholars for Excellence. It was a motivational program for students in grades 1-6.  The impetus really came from working with Operation Push and the Push Excel Program out of Chicago under Rev. Jesse Jackson. I often reflect on our…

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From The Storm Rises Winds Of Opportunity

By Barney Blakeney As Charleston ramps up efforts to assist in the recovery of the Bahama Islands after their recent devastation by Hurricane Dorian, in a Monday conversation about relief efforts John Wright president of the African American Settlement Communities Historic Commission, Inc. outlined an unprecedented proposal that would move assistance to the Bahamas beyond…

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Black Women in South Carolina Deserve Equal Pay

By Elected Black Women, SC General Assembly Today, August 22, marks Black Women’s Equal Pay Day. Far from a celebration, this day represents how far Black women nationwide had to work into 2019 to match what white, non-Hispanic men earned in 2018. Nationally, Black women working full-time, year-round earned 61 cents for every dollar earned…

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Benny Starr Hosts Mo’ Better Brunch at Blue Note Bistro

My fondest childhood memories growing up in rural Berkeley County, South Carolina are filled with music. I recall the soulful voices of Whitney, Otis, Michael—Shirley Caesar, all leaping from my mother’s stereo and into my mind’s eye. These voices held a majestic quality and sounded as if they came from someplace far off. On Saturdays,…

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African Americans Saved Cadillac

At the turn of the 20th century, the automobile entered the American scene. During that period there was a proliferation of car manufacturers. In 1903 alone 57 companies came into existence and 27 went bankrupt. Over the years numerous models were introduced that are now a distant memory. Studebaker and Hudson come to mind. But the Cadillac, introduced in…

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A political lesson Political candidates need new strategy to attract Black voters

By Nate Abraham, Jr., Carolina Panorama Publisher The presidential campaigns have hit South Carolina like a hurricane. Presidential candidates seem to be everywhere, playing “Let’s Make A Deal” with potential voters and trying to line up endorsements from preachers to politicians. This outdated idea is based on the misguided premise that Black folks have “leaders” and…

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Carolina Stories: "Charlie’s Place" tells the story of an African American nightclub in Myrtle Beach that was a significant stop on the Chitlin’ Circuit in the segregated South

Discussion With The Chronicle

“The Chronicle” is a revered institution in the Charleston Black community, with loyal readers and subscribers of all ethnicities. As the Palmetto state’s recognized leader in African-American news coverage for more than forty-four years, “The Chronicle” has successfully reported on, gathered, recorded, told and printed about the penetrating known and invisible stories of the Black experience, both locally and nationally, with unquestioned verve and tenacity.

Chronicle staffers Barney Blakeney, Hakim Abdul-Ali and Damion Smalls sat on the panel