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Thousands Share Fake Facebook Post Of Corona Vaccine Killing Children

Depending on the source, “fake news” can be a smear on reputable news outlets just trying to do their job. But in other hands, it can be a source of misleading rumors read by thousands that do damage and are hard to correct. Such was the story titled “Scandal in Senegal” that circled West Africa…

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2020 Howard Grad Earns Ph.D. at Age 73

On April 26, 2020, Florence Nwando Onwusi Didigu, 73, defended her dissertation to earn her Ph.D. in Communication, Culture and Media Studies. Her dissertation and future book titled, “Igbo Collective Memory of the Nigeria – Biafra War (1967-1970): Reclaiming Forgotten Women’s Voices and Building Peace through a Gendered Lens,” is a reflection of the Igbo women…

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First Kenyan PhD Marine Scientist Passes

Kenya’s first PhD marine scientist, Prof Mohamed Hyder, died at his home in Kizingo, Mombasa, after a long illness. The 88-year-old leaves behind a wife and three children. After completing his undergraduate work at Makerere University, Professor Hyder moved to Scotland where he took up biology, which was his passion. While teaching at Makerere, he…

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ANC Military Leader Who Shared Prison Time With Madiba Passes

One time ANC military Denis Goldberg was one of Nelson Mandela’s two co-defendants from the 1963-64 Rivonia trial at which 10 men were on trial for their lives for conspiring to overthrow the apartheid regime by force. Goldberg was sentenced to life imprisonment alongside Mandela for the crime of sabotage, serving 22 years at Pretoria…

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With Fela Kuti, Drummer Tony Allen Created The Afrobeat Sound

Pioneering drummer for many decades, Tony Allen was a musical partner of the Nigerian singer, composer and activist Fela Anikulapo-Kuti. He passed away in Paris at age 79. Allen was the drummer and musical director of Fela’s band Africa ’70 and was one of the primary co-founders of the Afrobeat sound. As Fela sharpened his…

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U.N. Unveils Fight Against A Fake News ‘Infodemic’ That Puts Lives At Risk 

While Americans hotly debate the subject of “fake news,” Africans and others around the world marked a day for reflection on press freedoms in theory and in practice. The theme for this year’s event launched by the U.N. agency UNESCO was “Journalism without fear or favor”. The state of journalism in most parts of the…

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Catastrophic Floods, Linked To Human Activities, Submerge Lake Victoria Region

Pounding rains over the last two months have set off catastrophic flooding of biblical proportions, surging over the weekend into some 20 of the 47 Kenyan counties bordering Lake Victoria – a massive trans-boundary body of water shared by Kenya, Tanzania and Uganda. Some 23 rivers empty water into the lake. “These floods are the…

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Africans Mourn the Passing of a Distinguished Thinker and Two Outstanding Artists

While the rate of fatalities in Africa is still much below that of developed countries, every life lost is a library gone, according to the saying. Here are three noted Africans who passed this year just as thousands of lives were tragically lost to a virus worldwide. Dr. Mansour Khalid, a prolific author in both…

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Kenyan Growers Send ‘Flowers Of Hope’ As  Major Markets Dry Up

It was inevitable during a lockdown that sales of Kenya’s flower exports would dry up as buyers make fewer impulse purchases of carnations, roses and other blossoms. According to data from the Kenya Flower Council, sales of cut flowers in overseas markets have fallen below 35 percent of what is expected this time of the…

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Young Kenyan Brothers Ease COVID-19 Mask and Clean Water Shortages

Journalists who step out of their high-floor offices or manage to escape from their coronavirus confinement sometimes find a great story right on the street below. Such was the story discovered by Kevin Phillips Momanyi, a reporter with Kenya’s Tuko news channel. His piece, titled the “Unsung Heroes such as of the Majengo slums,” profiled…

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As June 30 Application Deadline Nears, House Leaders Demand Details on PPP Small-Business Loan Program

By Charlene Crowell (TriceEdneyWire.com) – As the remaining days dwindle for small businesses to apply for loans through the federal Paycheck Protection Program (PPP), both banks and federal officials are being challenged by several House leaders to explain how the $670 billion program intended to aid the nation’s small businesses has actually been operating. Although…

Juneteenth: Honoring our Ancestors

By Dr. Gail C. Christopher, Executive Director, National Collaborative for Health Equity Today, the Juneteenth holiday, should be a source of inspiration for all people in America. Commemorating this day will help us all breathe by inspiring us to see and to eliminate the lasting, until now, seemingly permanent, permission to devalue other human beings,…

‘Listening’ to Blacks Shouldn’t Be Conditional

By Rev. Dean Nelson Too many whites on the right and left only want to listen to Blacks who agree with them on everything. The horrifying murders of Ahmaud Arbery, Breonna Taylor, and George Floyd has sparked unprecedented conversations about race in America on every imaginable platform. I have been touched by many white friends…

The Impact of COVID-19 in Our Community: Let’s Not Put Our Health at Risk

By J.C. Watts Washington, D.C., city attorney George Valentine was black, brilliant, and fit. But after contracting COVID-19, he became so weak, he had trouble moving and even speaking. When it got to the point where he could barely breathe, George called an ambulance and waited on the steps of his house for it to…

ENOUGH – Will the Murder of George Floyd Finally Bring About the Change Black People Have Been Demanding?

By Jeffrey L. Boney, Houston Forward Times Associate Editor “I can’t breathe!” This has become an all too familiar phrase, uttered by yet another African American man on video, nearly six years after America was temporarily traumatized by the story of Eric Garner. Garner, of course, was infamously captured on video being choked to death…

Racial divide of coronavirus is real, so are innovations that can help

By Allyson Y. Schwartz and Martha A. Dawson News about the novel coronavirus, which has now claimed over 100,000 American lives, is all around us. A subtext told in this reporting is the painful story of the pandemic’s devastating effect on people of color. While coronavirus does not know boundaries of race, income, or ethnicity, its disproportionate…

Can Jamie Harrison Beat Lindsey Graham In South Carolina?

By Barney Blakeney Former South Carolina Democratic Party Chair Jamie Harrison is set to challenge Sen. Lindsey Graham in the November 3 general election to become the first Democratic senator from South Carolina since Fritz Hollings retired in 2005. He perhaps is mounting the most serious challenge Graham has faced in years. I used to…

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A New World Order Taking Place

By Hakim Abdul-Ali I was recently listening in a gas station to two very pessimistic men talking about what’s presently going on in the world-at-large. As I stood behind them in line at the cashier’s counter, and in hearing more of their informal and unpretentious bantering, I felt ironically that they seemed to be completely…

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Crack The Door: Reopen The State

By Beverly Gadson-Birch Memorial Day weekend, one of the busiest holidays of the year, Governor McMaster is cracking open the state’s doors for business, purportedly on a much smaller scale.  After two months of lockdown, folks are eager to get their boats out on the water, chill out on beaches and fire up the grill.…

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Criticism and Facebook Posts Don’t Fix Problems

By Barney Blakeney I’m technologically challenged. I don’t do technology very well (mostly by choice).  So I tell folks, if you want me to see something immediately, don’t put it on Facebook, call or email me. Those two technical venues I can handle. So I’m on Facebook the other day when I see a message…

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Thinking About The Present Times

By Hakim Abdul-Ali As you read this, I’d like you to consider the spiritual fact about how bless you and I are to be alive in this phase of existence so far, especially, considering what’s going on. I hope you are not taking that for granted because the living experience thus far is becoming quite…

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Living Through Challenging Times

By Beverly Gadson-Birch I do not know about you, but I need to take a break from the news. As the country opens back up for business, folks are already letting their guard down. They are not wearing masks and practicing social distancing in public places. It is good some restrictions are being lifted, but shoppers…

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What About the Parents?

Without a doubt these are trying times. Every day we hear about, talk about and honor first line responders and essential workers. I support this, but I would like to add parents to those we honor as well. In most situations parents don’t have a choice about the role they must perform. For example, imagine…

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Re-opening During a Pandemic takes Strategic Planning for Sustainability

As states reopen their economies during the Coronavirus pandemic, opportunities abound to make African American businesses sustainable. To keep your doors, open right now do not disregard the importance of ensuring customers have a safe, healthy shopping experience. Don’t become a statistic because you failed to take measures to assure your customers you care about…

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Lowcountry Local First Advocates A New Normal For Charleston’s Economic Future

Once the panic subsides, if the panic subsides, we would be mistaken to not pause long enough to think about the future of our city, region, and country with a new lens. Charleston’s real estate boom has been like a Girls Gone Wild video of investors clamoring to own a piece of the Holy City.…

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COVID-19 and Black America: Things A Vaccine Will Not Cure

By Dr. William Small, Jr. Old sayings often get to be old because they are most often true. One such saying that comes immediately to mind, suggests that when America gets a cold, Black America gets pneumonia. The current Covid-19 crisis illustrates that in spite of all of the political, social and economic progress that…

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As COVID-19 continues to spread amid a growing number of fatalities, Dr. James Hildreth said it’s critical that everyone follows stay-at-home orders, social distancing guidelines, and anything else that could help keep Americans safe during the pandemic

Discussion With The Chronicle

“The Chronicle” is a revered institution in the Charleston Black community, with loyal readers and subscribers of all ethnicities. As the Palmetto state’s recognized leader in African-American news coverage for more than forty-four years, “The Chronicle” has successfully reported on, gathered, recorded, told and printed about the penetrating known and invisible stories of the Black experience, both locally and nationally, with unquestioned verve and tenacity.

Chronicle staffers Barney Blakeney, Hakim Abdul-Ali and Damion Smalls sat on the panel