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At World War I Ceremony, The Songbird of Togo Reappears

At a gathering of world leaders in the French capital of Paris, singer-songwriter Angelique Kidjo reprised an hypnotic work of ethereal beauty by a youthful West African singer. With a repertoire of just 17 songs, the diva, Bella Bellow, had won the hearts of presidents, accomplished artists and worldwide fans. Kidjo’s choice of Blewu (“Patience”)…

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Mauritania Ordered to End Forced Labor or Lose Trade Benefits

Forced labor tolerated by the Mauritanian government was called a decisive factor in the U.S. decision this week to end favored nation trade status for the country as of January 1. “Forced or compulsory labor practices like hereditary slavery have no place in the 21st century,” said Deputy U.S. Trade Representative C.J. Mahoney. “This action…

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Memories of Jonestown Massacre Leave Haunting Memories, but Important Lessons During 40th Anniversary

(TriceEdneyWire.com) – The church building at 1859 Geary Street in San Francisco was in its earlier days festive, vibrant and joyous. Like a cultural hub, there was often plenty of dancing, entertainment; even skits, plays; lots of food and toys for the children. But, this Sunday morning was different. “There was an eerie type of…

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Rights Group Condemn Rise Of Gov’t-Sponsored Homophobia in Tanzania

Dar es Salaam’s governor Paul Makonda has begun urging citizens to report homosexuals for round-ups, sending hundreds of LGBT activists into hiding to avoid arrest. “If you know any gays … report them to me,” Makonda told reporters, according to CNN. In an interview posted on YouTube, Makonda said he had already received more than…

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African Diaspora Film Festival Takes on “Who is Black in America?”

By Stacy M. Brown, NNPA Newswire Correspondent @StacyBrownMedia The 26th annual installment of the African Diaspora International Film Festival promises to tackle the topic: “Who is Black in America?” The popular festival, which showcases black filmmakers, actors, directors and producers all over the world, runs from Friday, Nov. 23 to Sunday, Dec. 9, at venues…

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Trump’s Campaign Strategist Hired For Nigerian Presidential Race

Cash money makes things happen. That’s an expression taken from the Urban Dictionary but it may also be the hope of Atiku Abubakar, candidate for President of Nigeria with the opposition Peoples Democratic Party which just hired Donald Trump’s lobbying firm at an astronomical price. The Florida-based firm is led by Brian Ballard of Ballard…

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South Africa Must Address Air Pollution Hot Spots – Now!

The world’s largest air pollution hotspot is not where you might think. No, it’s not in New Jersey. But if you said South Africa you’d be right, according to a newly-released study by the environmental group Greenpeace. With coal and transport as the two principle sources of air pollution, Eastern Mpumalanga province in South Africa…

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Ethiopian Woman Breaks Glass Ceiling to Become Nation’s New Head of State

“Congratulations Madam President! Women do make a difference. We are proud of you!” That was the excited message from María Fernanda Espinosa Garces, President of the United Nations General Assembly, to a U.N. colleague selected to be the first woman president in Ethiopia. In a unanimous vote, Ethiopian lawmakers this week approved Sahle-Work Zewde for…

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Gabon Warned Against ‘Fake News’ While President Is Hospitalized For Exhaustion

Balloons and fireworks will have to wait as the longtime President of Gabon has been hospitalized at the King Faisal hospital in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia, suffering from severe fatigue. The party of President Ali Bongo had just “coasted to victory” in a second round of legislative elections this month when the President fell ill. A…

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Namibia Agrees to ‘Land Deal’ with Russian Billionaire

The Namibian government has leased four farms for 99 years to a company owned by a Russian billionaire. The farms, valued at $3 million and measuring a total 42,000 acres, were registered as state property by the land reform ministry. Land reform minister Utoni Nujoma appears to be having second thoughts about being linked to…

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Can the Working Families Party Emerge as the Progressive Third Force in American Politics?

By Dr. Ron Daniels, President of the Institute of the Black World 21st Century and Distinguished Lecturer Emeritus, York College City University of New York For much of my life’s work as a social and political activist, I have been a proponent of independent Black politics and the creation of a progressive, independent, third force in…

Democrats Need a Plan That Goes Beyond Responding to Trump’s Outrage of the Day

By Jesse Jackson (TriceEdneyWire.com) – With majority control in the House of Representatives, Democrats have an enormous opportunity — and face a distinct peril. The opportunity is to lay out in hearings and in legislation a long-overdue change agenda for America. The peril is they’ll get caught responding to President Trump’s outrage a day, focus…

America Has Come to This

By Dr. E. Faye Williams (TriceEdneyWire.com) – Recently we learned of boys in Wisconsin throwing Nazi salutes and flashing white power signs. This is disturbing. Who taught them to do this? Did they learn it at home or school? Did they pick it up from the chaos in our nation? I wonder if students even…

Consumer Financial Protection Bureau Neglects Duty to Enforce Military Lending Act

By Charlene Crowell Although predatory lending often conjures up images of an economically blighted Urban America, seldom does the image of an enlisted man or woman come to mind. But just as check cashing stores, along payday and auto title loan shops focus on communities of color, America’s military is also a frequent target. For…

Urban League Movement Mourns Ntozake Shange, “One of the Original Conjurers of Black Girl Magic”

By Marc H. Morial, President and CEO of the National Urban League (TriceEdneyWire.com) “somebody/ anybody sing a black girl’s song bring her out to know herself to know you but sing her rhythms carin/ struggle/ hard times sing her song of life she’s been dead so long closed in silence so long she doesn’t know…

Hate and Horror — When Does It Stop?

By Julianne Malveaux, NNPA Newswire Contributor As strange as it seems, I now view the Bush years with nostalgia. Both Big Bush (POTUS 41) and his son Shrub (POTUS 43) incurred the ire of Democrats, with Shrubs Supreme Court-complicit theft of the 2000 election prompting anger and protests. Both Bushes, perhaps because of their love…

Reflections About An Uncertain Future

By Barney Blakeney By the time this is published the 2018 general elections will be over so I won’t go into any of the ‘we should-a, we could-a, if we would-a.’ By the time you read this it will be ‘we hafta’ deal with it. I voted early as usual. I work Tuesdays so I…

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“Come Clean” Charleston County School Board

By Beverly Gadson-Birch By the time you read this article, it will be all over but the shouting. It’s been a tough stretch to the finish line and I am sure everyone is ready to exhale. Hopefully, persons elected will be the face of a new Democracy—one that tells the truth, respects women, builds relationships…

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America’s Ever-Lasting Problems

By Hakim Abdul-Ali Many troubled nations of the world are being torn apart by internal and external hatreds to the extreme, and our potentially great nation is no different. Sadly, and most recently, from the tragic assassinations of eleven Jewish worshippers in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, to, well, you name the next town, city, county or state,…

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Living In A Fantasy

By Barney Blakeney I grew up in the 1960s reading comic books. My younger brother and I bought hundreds of them using the nickels and dimes we earned doing household chores. My lil brother became quite the collector. I was drawn to the fantasy of superheroes. Despite that, all the superheroes I read about were…

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Election Results: “We Be Comin’ Round The Mountain”

By Beverly Gadson-Birch There is one week left before the final vote is cast and the winners are announced. And, there have been some knock down, drag out arguments over the best candidates and even some who I thought may have been the best candidate for office fell short in the debate.    I hope…

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Thinking Out Loud in Fall

By Hakim Abdul-Ali   It’s that time of the year when the leaves of autumn will soon be falling from the trees in many sectors of our country. The only thing I can say about this phenomena is that it’s spectacularly wonderful. So, as I begin to process my upcoming thoughts for this week’s article,…

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QEP Releases Statement on the Racist Comments of Andrea Pruitt

This past week, Andrea Pruitt, the spouse of Andy Pruitt, the Director of Communications for CCSD, posted racist and racially inappropriate messages on social media, contrasting students at Burke High School who were attending school without air conditioning to “kids in Africa [who] walk across mountain ranges, barefoot in hundred degree heat dodging herds of…

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Re: “How Jerk Chicken Made Me Rethink Charleston’s Plantation Culture”

By Lorna Beck  I am writing in response to D.R.E James’ article titled “How Jerk Chicken Made Me Rethink Charleston’s Plantation Culture”. The article appeared in the Sept. 7 issue of The Charleston Chronicle. In response to Mr. James’ article, I’d like to pose this question: “Can jerk chicken be the instrument that shows the…

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Dominion Energy Supports Diversity and Empowers Communities

By Morenike K. Miles Dominion Energy is a company with a long history of dedication to customer service, diversity, and community involvement. Those are more than just words, but an active commitment to creating genuine opportunity for all people. We believe a diverse workforce is essential in fulfilling our core values of safety, ethics, excellence…

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Serena’s Issue Is Bigger Than Gender

By Dr. William Small, Jr. I must confess that I have great admiration for the Williams family and the contribution that they have made to professional sports and to professional tennis in particular. The family’s odyssey from Compton, California to “center stage” in the world of professional tennis is truly a great American story. The…

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From the Sea to the Table: Episode 1 - Ray DeeZy links up with Chef George in North Charleston to learn about Gullah Cuisine, while making friend cabbage, rice, shrimp, and clams

Discussion With The Chronicle

“The Chronicle” is a revered institution in the Charleston Black community, with loyal readers and subscribers of all ethnicities. As the Palmetto state’s recognized leader in African-American news coverage for more than forty-four years, “The Chronicle” has successfully reported on, gathered, recorded, told and printed about the penetrating known and invisible stories of the Black experience, both locally and nationally, with unquestioned verve and tenacity.

Chronicle staffers Barney Blakeney, Hakim Abdul-Ali and Damion Smalls sat on the panel