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South African Candidate For Space Flight Dies In Motorbike Crash

Family and friends are mourning the untimely death of Mandla Maseko, South Africa’s candidate to be the first Black African in space. Maseko was killed when a car struck his bike in Pretoria over the weekend. He was 30. In 2013, the part-time disc jockey and candidate officer for the South African air force beat…

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Nigeria Restores The Study Of History In Public Schools – Absent For A Decade

The government of Muhammadu Buhari is bringing back the teaching of history in all basic and secondary schools – ending a decade in which departments of history were dismantled or merged into other programs as having little earnings potential for the high school graduate. In a release signed by Sonny Echono, Permanent Secretary, Ministry of…

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A Colonial-Era Law That Outlawed Same-Sex Relations Is Defeated

If a democratic society is characterized by “tolerance, diversity and open-mindedness,” three countries in Africa have now reached that pinnacle. This month, Botswana joined Angola and Mozambique in decriminalizing same-sex relations. High Court Justice Michael Lebruru, in his defining decision, added: “human dignity is harmed when minority groups are marginalized.” The ruling decided a case…

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Resistance Explodes In Sudan Amidst Harsh Crackdown By Ruling Generals

Leaders of the Sudanese resistance are calling for a one-day nationwide “civil disobedience” campaign on July 14. The action is expected to push the ruling generals towards a settlement and the creation of a civilian government, which has been the demand from the beginning. The nationwide action will be preceded by mass protests on July…

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Tunisia Adopts Trump Policy, Turing Against Migrants

A shipload of desperate Bangladeshi migrants was told to turn the boat around and go home by Tunisian officials or be deprived of food, water and medicines. The migrants, trapped on a merchant ship off Tunisia for three weeks, were sent back to their home country against their will, according to relatives. The International Organization…

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Senegalese in Wall Street Protest Fear Offshore Oil/Gas Resources Lost to Fraud

A foreign investor with mineral assets throughout Africa is alleged to have made a secret payment of $250,000 to a company run by the brother of the president of Senegal, in a bid to obtain the country’s assets, according to recently published reports in the BBC and Global Witness. The payment to Aliou Sall, brother of…

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Coup Plot Led By ‘Old Guard’ Foiled In Ethiopia

Rebel gunmen launched a coordinated assault over the weekend in the Ethiopian state of Amhara in a challenge to President Abiy Ahmed and his sweeping reform program. Several senior government officials died in the assault including the army chief and the governor of Amhara state. Mr. Ahmed rushed to the region and, wearing army fatigues,…

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African Cocoa Growers Take Hard Line On Prices – Better Ones Or Else!

Strike! That’s the sound of the world’s top two producers of cocoa who say they are suspending their sales for better prices. The governments of Ivory Coast and Ghana are trying this time-honored strategy to address the imbalance between farmers’ income and money made by foreign commodity markets who scoop up most of the profit.…

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Orthodox Church in Ethiopia Blocks Gay Group Planning Tour

Pride parades, gay friendly diners, movies, books and fashion. The gay life tyle is coming to town but the welcome mat is still far from ubiquitous. Ethiopia, home to Abiy Ahmed, the “hugging president,” has yet to come to terms with LGBT or Q. In fact, some Ethiopian bloggers have been openly unfriendly to say…

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Former President Of Egypt Dies On The Stand In Contentious Court Hearing

Egyptian ex-president Mohammed Morsi, persecuted by the current military regime according to rights activists, collapsed on the stand and died after giving testimony in his trial, it was reported on state TV. Morsi, 67, had been speaking from the glass “cage” where he was confined during sessions. He warned of “many secrets” he could reveal,…

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There is Not a Racist Bone in My Body

By Roger Caldwell, NNPA Newswire Contributor In 2019, most Blacks and people of color would like to believe that, “There is Not a Racist Bone in My Body” was an accurate statement in America. With the first African American President, Black businesses in every major city, and Black political officials in federal, state, and local…

Trump threatens anti-fascists with being classified as “terrorists”?

By Bill Fletcher, Jr., NNPA Newswire Contributor It should not surprise us that a person who would claim that there were “good people” among the fascist demonstrators in Charlottesville, Virginia would now move to classify an anti-fascist network as alleged “terrorists.” But that is precisely what “Agent Orange,” i.e., Donald Trump, has been intimating. Unfortunately,…

Red Summer and Its Reverberations

By Julianne Malveaux (TriceEdneyWire.com) – One hundred years ago, starting on July 27 and for thirteen more days, Chicago was engulfed in violence. White mobs wantonly attacked Black people, and Black people fought back. It started when a Black teenager, swimming in segregated Lake Michigan, drifted to the “wrong” side of the lake. Whites stoned…

Legalizing Marijuana

By Marc Morial (TriceEdneyWire.com) – “The U.S. “war on drugs” — a decades-long policy of racial and class suppression hidden behind cannabis criminality — has resulted in the arrest, interdiction, and incarceration of a high percentage of Americans of color. The legal cannabis industry represents a great opportunity to help balance the detrimental effects of…

Vaccines, Preventable Diseases and Children’s Health: A Call to Action

By Marian Wright Edelman I’ve never forgotten my family’s sadness over the senseless death of my childhood neighbor little Johnny Harrington, who lived three houses down from our church parsonage in segregated Bennettsville, South Carolina. Johnny stepped on a rusted nail and died of the resulting tetanus infection because his hard-working grandmother had no doctor…

Black Women Taking on the Fight Against Diabetes

By Linda Goler Blount, MPH, President and CEO, Black Women’s Health Imperative The cost of insulin is skyrocketing and people—especially Black women—are dying because they cannot afford or don’t have access to vital medication. There is not enough being done to lower the prices of prescription medications that could mean life or death for so…

I Get Less Hassle Washing Pots!

By Barney Blakeney I was washing a leftover grits pot at my church Sunday morning (we do a monthly community breakfast each second Saturday –all are welcome to Charleston’s best home-cooked breakfast specially prepared by the loving hands of the women and men of Wesley UMC/Charleston) when my church brother walked into the kitchen asking…

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Charleston County School Superintendent & Board: “Clean Up, What You Mess Up and Start Over”

By Beverly Gadson-Birch Y’all know how these modern day kids are. They play with at least four or five toys at a time and when they are done, they leave them scattered on the floor. My grandson is among those modern day kids with a modern day mom. Notice, I did not say modern day…

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A Quiet Moment to Myself Encounter

By Hakim Abdul-Ali Today’s living experiences for many uptight folk could loosely and best be very described as frantic, hectic and very engagingly chaotic. To most of those inclusive “hue-mans,” who are probably caught up in this seemingly never ending hustle bustle type of existence, I probably haven’t said anything that is new, shocking or…

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Robo Calls: Robos, Hobos

By Beverly Gadson-Birch Robo callers are about to be hobos if left up to the FCC. It may be impossible to control but at least they are taking steps to bring these calls under control. How many times have you jumped out of the shower thinking it could be your child in distress only to…

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Understanding the Necessity of Having Faith

By Hakim Abdul-Ali Being a true believer in the existence of the Most High Alone sometimes makes me have to momentarily step back and look at life’s happenings that are occurring around me with a trusting spiritual mindset. I know that even though I believe in God Alone as I do there are many other…

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The Politics of Progress

By Barney Blakeney I’m getting calls from a lot of people promoting their presidential candidate. It’s that time again and they all want publicity. Ain’t nobody talking about no money though! Black folks need to understand politics is all about money – who makes it and how. It seems like everybody’s trying to get their…

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Concerning The Snowden Community Sewer Issue

We, the Snowden Advocacy Group (SAG), are fully aware of and understand that county council has made the appropriate decision to postpone voting for approval of the ordinance regarding the community’s proposed public facility. We support the ordinance revisions to ensure that the unincorporated communities are not subject to overdevelopment and at increased risk for…

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Lowcountry Food Bank Urges South Carolina Senators to Support Efforts to Close the Summer Child Hunger Gap in South Carolina

“During the summer, a mere 17 percent of the more than 22 million children nationally who receive free or reduced-price lunch during the school year access a summer feeding program – and only 16.7 of children in South Carolina,” said Pat Walker, Lowcountry Food Bank President and CEO. “This leaves 307,109 of children in South…

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Seabrook: Trump Is A Dangerous Man

By Dr. Luther Seabrook, former educator Oh, how I yearn for the days of yesteryear when the leader of a country fronted his army and led them to war. They were real leaders. They were brave and of substance. Those days are gone, most likely forever. What do we have now? Our national leader is…

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Burn Down the Plantations (In Theory, At Least)

By D.R.E. James The biggest and baddest dudes on the corner of Aiken and Columbus Street paused their dice game as I approached. They felt compelled to inform me how crazy I was for wearing a hoodie that read, in gold stitching: “BURN DOWN THE PLANTATIONS”. These men were the biggest and the baddest on…

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Carolina Stories: "Charlie’s Place" tells the story of an African American nightclub in Myrtle Beach that was a significant stop on the Chitlin’ Circuit in the segregated South

Discussion With The Chronicle

“The Chronicle” is a revered institution in the Charleston Black community, with loyal readers and subscribers of all ethnicities. As the Palmetto state’s recognized leader in African-American news coverage for more than forty-four years, “The Chronicle” has successfully reported on, gathered, recorded, told and printed about the penetrating known and invisible stories of the Black experience, both locally and nationally, with unquestioned verve and tenacity.

Chronicle staffers Barney Blakeney, Hakim Abdul-Ali and Damion Smalls sat on the panel