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Ex-President Of Sudan Charged With Complicity In Protestor Deaths

From the presidency to prisoner behind bars, former President Omar al-Bashir now faces formal charges of murder in the latest development to spring from a massive turnout of Sudanese people demanding civilian rule. “Omar al-Bashir and others have been charged for inciting and participating in the killing of demonstrators,” the office of Sudan’s acting prosecutor…

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In A Squeaker, African National Congress Wins 57.5 Percent Of Vote

Frustrated with the failures of the ruling African National Congress, South Africans gave the ANC its lowest turnout since 2004 when it took a record 69% of the vote. The ANC won a sixth straight term but with the worst ever electoral showing for the iconic party. Voter turnout was low. Thousands of youth did…

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Plea Deal for Navy Seal Linked to Strangulation Death of U. S. Army Soldier in Mali

A generous plea deal has been offered to the first of two Navy SEALS and two Marine Raiders charged in the strangulation death of a U.S. Army Special Forces soldier based in Bamako, Mali. Staff Sgt. Logan J. Melgar was found dead on June 4, 2017 in housing he shared with other special operations forces…

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World Bank Ups Its Aid Package For Countries Hit By Record-Strength Cyclones

The new head of the World Bank has approved emergency support for the three African countries slammed by record-strength cyclones in what has been called the worst weather catastrophe in decades. Tropical Cyclone Idai ripped through Mozambique with 110 mph winds and a storm surge topping 20 feet before moving inland into Zimbabwe and Malawi.…

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Inaugural Grand African Run Announced in Washington

By Stacy M. Brown, NNPA Newswire Correspondent @StacyBrownMedia The late South African Leader Nelson Mandela famously noted that sport has the power to change the world, inspire, and unite in a way that little else does. “It speaks to youth in a language they understand. Sport can create hope, where once there was only despair,”…

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ANC Sees Victory In May 8 Polls While Acknowledging Mistakes

Three political parties are pulling out all the stops to win the last undecided voters going to the polls on May 8 to elect the nation’s leaders. The three are running in a field of 48. The long-ruling ANC (since 1994) is expected to vanquish the competition despite having let down much of the electorate…

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Oil Barons Bid Billions For Mozambican Oil While Storm Fatalities Spike

The back-to-back cyclones that have ravaged Mozambique are unprecedented in recorded history, the UN said Friday. As more villages are wiped away, a multi-billion dollar bidding war is heating up in foreign board rooms among multinationals eager to extract Mozambican oil. Top bid so far by Occidental Petroleum Corp has reached $57 billion. The fantastic…

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After Risking Life, Liberian Activist Scoops ‘Green Nobel Prize’

Multinational corporations who seek weak democracies, high rates of poverty, and untapped resources, seem to make a beeline for Liberia which has struggled to overcome two wars and the devastating pandemic of ebola. As a result, “Liberia has been taken over by multinational corporations exploiting its resources at the expense of Liberians, especially the country’s…

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Woni Spotts, The First Black Woman to Travel to Every Country and Continent in the World

Woni Spotts reached the goal of visiting every country and continent in the world. Woni’s travels began as a child when she accompanied her parents on tours. Later, Woni hosted a travel documentary with the goal of visiting every country. During the mid-2000s, Woni toured Monaco, France, and Southern Europe. Between 2014 and 2018, Woni visited Germany, Netherlands,…

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Former Pres. Nkrumah Recalled On Day Of His Passing

The anniversary of the passing of Ghana’s first Prime Minister and President, Dr. Kwame Nkrumah, prompted reflections by Ghanaians on social media of his legacy and contributions. Dr. Nkrumah’s daughter Samia, in an open letter, wrote: “Kwame Nkrumah may not be with us physically but he lives in our hearts and minds as the fire…

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Ignorance Breeds Racism

By E. Faye Williams, Esq. (TriceEdneyWire.com) – By ignorance breeding racism, I don’t mean the lack of college or other educational degrees. I’m really talking about how some families teach their children to hate certain people based upon lies. In order to really drive home the point, I’m making, I recommend a book called Confessions of A…

47 State Attorneys General Tell Secretary DeVos to Follow the Law: Forgive Federal Student Loans Held by Disabled Veterans

By Charlene Crowell Although Memorial Day is considered by many civilians as the unofficial start of summer, the true intent of the holiday is to annually honor those who lost their lives fighting for our country.  The men and women who wear or have worn this nation’s uniform in military service across wars and generations are…

School Vouchers Are a Failed Experiment

By Marc H. Morial (TriceEdneyWire.com) – “How bad are school vouchers for students? Far worse than most people imagine. Indeed, the use of school vouchers—which provide families with public dollars to spend on private schools—is equivalent to missing out on more than one-third of a year of classroom learning.” – Center for American Progress study,…

“Black” or “African American?”

By Stacy M. Brown, NNPA Newswire Correspondent @StacyBrownMedia In a recent televised commentary, Dr. Greg Carr, chair of Howard University’s Department of Afro-American Studies kick-started a stirring conversation that has mostly taken place inside the confines of Black communities around the country. Carr tackled the sometimes-uncomfortable topic of identifying as Black versus African-American. “Despite the dictionary…

We Can Free a Generation from Burden of College Loan Debt

By Jesse Jackson (TriceEdneyWire.com) – The reaction — shock, joy, disbelief, euphoria — revealed the importance of Robert F. Smith’s stunning gift, when he announced, unexpectedly, that he would pay off all the college debts of Morehouse College students graduating this year. His gift literally changed the prospects and the lives of the vast majority…

Remembering Unita Blackwell

By Marian Wright Edelman I was deeply sorry to hear of the passing of my friend Mayor Unita Blackwell. She was one of a kind. She was always laughing and making other people laugh and she never stopped growing, learning, rolling with the punches, and punching back when she had to. As a civil rights…

School Desegregation Just Another Symbol

By Barney Blakeney Last week marked the 65th anniversary of the U.S. Supreme Court’s 1954 school desegregation decision making public school racial segregation unlawful. Will someone please tell school officials in Charleston County and the rest of South Carolina! I started attending public schools in 1959 at East Bay Elementary School and matriculated through Charleston…

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Money, Money, Money: What Is It Good For?

By Beverly Gadson-Birch The O’Jays had a very popular song back in 1973 titled “For the Love of Money.” It goes something like this: “Money, money, money, some folks have to have it and some folks really need it; some people do bad things with it; when, you ought to do good things with it.”…

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Thoughts About Unity’s Appeals

By Hakum Abdul-Ali Brother El-Hajj Malik El-Shabazz, commonly known as Malcolm X, once said, “When ‘I’ is replaced by ‘we’ even illness becomes wellness.” Upon reflecting upon this quotation from this conscious giant’s mindset based on his teachings from the Islamic and African worlds’ perspectives, I thought about the concept of unity in the world-at-large.…

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Our Economic Future Is Not Just About How Much We Make

By Barney Blakeney I recently was watching a television newsmagazine broadcast and was enthralled by the story about automated retail checkout initiatives. Automated cashiers are coming in the wave of the future. It’s already here! For years I’ve been concerned about our shifting economy and value system, but it seems too few people are paying…

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A Sign That Registers

By Hakim Abdul-Ali Many times in my travels throughout the land between here and there, I come in contact with many interesting “hue-mans” and even more some curious and mind expanding illuminating signs. Well, last week was one of those occasions when I saw, of all things, a sign in a store that made me…

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Black Folks Need Effective Strategies

By Barney Blakeney I figured this week I’d write about the need for organized strategies in the continuing struggle for Black folks’ equality in our community. I know a lot of stuff happens behind the scenes that most, myself included, are not aware of. But it seems abundantly clear there’s not a whole lot of…

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Meth PSA and Letter to Editor

As most already know, the opiate epidemic has been worsening, each year claiming more lives than the last. What is less known by the general public is the problem with Methamphetamines has been growing over the last several years as well. In the most recent data from the 2017 National Survey on Drug Use and Health,…

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Second Mission Critical – North Charleston meeting planned for May 14

To Members of the North Charleston Community: As most of you are aware, the Garrett Academy closure announcement had made it necessary to “pause” the Mission Critical work in North Charleston while we sought clarification of the announcement from the superintendent and school board members. There is agreement on all sides that the district could have…

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The Danger of Forgetting History

By Robert R. Macdonald The Make It Right campaign to remove the John C. Calhoun monument from Marion Square devalues the importance of studying and understanding the past. Forgetting moments from our personal lives and our shared national history is natural. Who wants to be reminded of the times we as individuals and as a nation failed…

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Mobility Month 2019: “An Annual Celebration of Complete Streets”

May is Mobility Month! Formerly known as Bike Month, Charleston Moves dedicates May to promoting streets that are complete for everyone, designed to enable safe access for all users. We believe in the transformative power of allowing the community to choose among many safe ways to travel. When we’re able to ride a bike, walk…

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June is Black Music Month: Benny Starr & FOUR20s - "Resurrection" NPR Tiny Desk Submission 2019

Discussion With The Chronicle

“The Chronicle” is a revered institution in the Charleston Black community, with loyal readers and subscribers of all ethnicities. As the Palmetto state’s recognized leader in African-American news coverage for more than forty-four years, “The Chronicle” has successfully reported on, gathered, recorded, told and printed about the penetrating known and invisible stories of the Black experience, both locally and nationally, with unquestioned verve and tenacity.

Chronicle staffers Barney Blakeney, Hakim Abdul-Ali and Damion Smalls sat on the panel