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Commemorative Events Planned For Mandela’s Centenary

It is easy to break down and destroy. The heroes are those who make peace and build. Those were the prophetic words of President Nelson Mandela, whose role in the long struggle waged against the racist system of apartheid is recalled on the anniversary of his birth on July 18, 1918. This year, the theme…

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Supreme Court To Hear Sudan’s Appeal On Navy Ship Bombing

Sudan has been given the green light to appeal an award of damages for the bombing of the Navy ship USS Cole that killed and injured U.S. sailors almost two decades ago. The damages, totaling $314.7 million, were awarded as compensation for 17 American sailors killed and 39 injured in the bombing of the Navy…

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13,000 Africans Left To Die In The Sahara After Expulsion By Algeria

In one of the most shocking reports on the ill-treatment of refugees and asylum-seekers, the International Organization for Migration has confirmed that thousands of African migrants are being left to die in blistering desert heat after being deported by the government of Algeria and dumped in the Sahara. A new investigation by the Associated Press…

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Ugandan Inventor Wins Major Prize For Malaria Detector

Ugandan inventor Brian Gitta, 24, has scooped a major prize for his device that detects tell-tale signs of malaria – the leading cause of death in his country. In fact, Gitta developed the device, called “Matibabu” after blood tests failed to diagnose his own malaria. It took four blood tests to diagnose Mr. Gitta with…

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Amnesty International Finds Trouble Brewing in Cameroon

In a new 37 page report, the rights watchdog Amnesty International has documented “unlawful killings, destruction of private property, arbitrary arrests and torture” in two restive regions in Cameroon tied to a power struggle pitting French against English-speaking Cameroonians. In the Amnesty report titled, “A turn for the worse: Violence and human rights violations in…

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African Union To Hold Summit in ‘Slavery Hub’

“Corruption” is the theme of this year’s African Union Summit to be held next month in the capital of Mauritania – a country better known for being the last country in the world to ban slavery. According to the 2016 Global Slavery Index, Mauritania has one of the highest rates of slavery in the world,…

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Bribery Caught on Tape Nails Ghana’s Senior Soccer Brass

Senior officers of the revered Ghana Football Soccer Association who took fat wads of cash to influence player selection in the national team became the unwitting stars of a new documentary by Ghana’s number one investigative journalist. The film opened this month in Accra. The sting, called “astronomical” in its scope, caught big and small…

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Spain Gives ‘Safe Harbor’ to 629 Africans Stranded at Sea

After European leaders from Italy and Malta refused to accept a ship with over 600 mostly Africans aboard, it took the new prime minister of Spain to allow the stranded migrants a safe refuge. Pedro Sanchez, who took office a week ago, said the ship could dock in the Spanish city of Valencia. The migrants…

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Worldwide Campaign Frees Prominent Cartoonist in Equatorial Guinea Prison

If you’ve ever received a request to step up for a jailed author, artist or journalist, you might have wondered later: Was he ever freed? In the case of Ramon Nse Esono Ebale – he certainly was and he thanks you. In a moving letter published under the title “Artist, Finally Free, Leaves Country”, artist…

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Utah State and Fort Hare University Conservationist Tapped for U.N. Expert Panel on Biodiversity

U.N. activities for World Environment Day on June 6 were focused this year on plastic pollution. Marked every year since 1974, the day is celebrated in over 100 countries. Dr. Luthando Dziba, managing executive for conservation services at South African National Parks (SANParks) has been appointed to the UN body on biodiversity and ecosystems. Dziba,…

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July 2nd Is My Independence Day

By Hank Sanders, Alabama District 23 Sen. Hank Sanders July 2nd is an important date to me.  It is important to others for different reasons. Let me tell you why. I grew up in a segregated society. It was not just segregated, but very oppressive. Most Americans think of segregation as just separation of the…

Rep. Maxine Waters Takes Strong Stand for Fair Housing at HUD

By Charlene Crowell When Dr. Ben Carson was named Secretary of the Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD), many housing and civil rights advocates wondered how a world-renowned neurosurgeon would direct the future of housing in America. By his own admission, he arrived at HUD with no governmental experience or active interest in housing’s history…

Black Dollars Matter: It’s Time for Blacks to Pull the Trigger on Politics

By Jeffrey L. Boney, NNPA Newswire Contributor How often do we hear messages about the amount of money Black people spend every year as consumers? In a recent report by Nielsen titled, “Black Dollars Matter: The Sales Impact of Black Consumers,” the message was once again highlighted: While African Americans make up just 14 percent…

A Cruel Abandonment of the ‘Least of These’

By Marian Wright Edelman “Little kids are begging and screaming not to be taken from parents, and they’re hauled off. Parents are telling their older kids, ‘Be brave, be brave.’ It’s as bad as anything I’ve seen in 25-plus years of doing this work.” –ACLU immigration attorney Lee Gelernt Once again Americans are at a…

This is America: Black Clergy Jailed and Shackled for Supreme Court Prayer Protest

By Julianne Malveaux, NNPA Newswire Columnist Faith and prayer have been the backbone of the African American community since we came upon these shores. We have counted on our faith leaders (the roll call would include Revs. Richard Allen, Absalom Jones, James Walker Hood, Martin Luther King, Jr., Wyatt Tee Walker, Jesse L. Jackson, William…

Black Mamas Are Dying. We Can Stop It.

By Congresswoman Robin Kelly (D-Ill.) Black mothers are dying and it’s time to do something about it. Every year, more than 700 American mothers lose their lives to pregnancy or birth-related complications. Some medical professionals estimate that at least half, if not more, of these deaths are entirely preventable. While the deaths of 700-plus American…

Respecting Living as a Blessed Sign

By Hakim Abdul-Ali A very close and dear friend from New Jersey, who I hadn’t seen or heard from in decades, died sometime last month. I was made aware of his passing by another mutual friend of the both the departed soul and yours truly. Also, I was informed that my friend who died was…

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Allowing Elected Officials To Stick Us With Debts

By Barney Blakeney With the November 6 general elections looming, a couple of items that came across my desk in the past week seem more important – a request by the S.C. National Action Network for investigations into the former Charleston Naval Hospital property sale and redevelopment and rate reductions for SCE&G customers. Voters should…

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Apology For Slavery Not Accepted (Until Whites Come Up With A Comprehensive, Compensatory Plan)

By Beverly Gadson-Birch   I have given this apology for slavery a lot of thought. Upon hearing the City of Charleston Councilmembers apologize for slavery, I immediately texted and asked a friend, “what now?” Now that you have apologized, what do you plan to do about the subjugation of a class of people—my people, descendants of…

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A Brighter Upside of Yourself

By Hakim Abdul-Ali A few weeks ago I wrote an article called “Suicide and Lessons Learned”. The article was and is self-explanatory, and I’ve been blessed to have so many folk reach out to from beyond The Chronicle’s zip code to thank me for putting into print my vibes on that all-too-real issue. Everyone seemed…

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Montford Point Marines – A Moment In Time For James Campbell

By Barney Blakeney They say there aren’t enough hours in the day. For years, I thought my lack of sufficient time to get stuff done was due to my time management – setting priorities and scheduling accordingly. I’ve come to think no matter how well you do those things, when you’ve got a lot of…

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About “The Apology”…

By Barney Blakeney I try to stay away from ‘hot topics’ when writing this column. I figure if everybody else is talking about a subject, how much more can I add? But a friend and regular reader of this diatribe said she is interested to see what I have to say on the subject of…

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Real support for moms this Mother’s Day

This Mother’s Day we celebrate moms who are working to be the best moms they can be. Here in Charleston, many moms may be in need of some extra support, especially those women who are expecting their first baby. When I was pregnant with my first baby, I had so many questions about what to…

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Good(will) for the Environment & Community: The Case for Donating Locally

By Robert Smith, Palmetto Goodwill President/CEO Think globally, act locally is a phrase often used to encourage people to take small actions in order to do their part toward combating worldwide issues that seem daunting to take on. Protecting our planet is a perfect example.  One may ask, “What small actions can individuals take that actually…

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Celebration or Ritual?

  By Dr. William Small, Jr. The practice of effectively organizing and celebrating the importance of events is validated by its existence in all cultures. Celebrations on their face speak to values which define and affirm a people. Christmas, Columbus Day, the Fourth of July, for example all say something about the soul and character…

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A Public Call for School Board Members to Dismantle Racial Barriers in Education

The status of public education in Charleston County has been the subject of intense though warranted scrutiny by a high-profile report, “The State of Racial Disparities in Charleston County, South Carolina 2000-2015.” Dr. Stacey Patton, a professor of History and Journalism at Morgan State University and acclaimed author, published the report in consultation with the…

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In this episode of “Meet The Black Press,” NNPA Podcast Host Akil Wilson talks to James Washington, the publisher of The Dallas Weekly, about the business of running a Black newspaper and the future of the Black Press

Discussion With The Chronicle

“The Chronicle” is a revered institution in the Charleston Black community, with loyal readers and subscribers of all ethnicities. As the Palmetto state’s recognized leader in African-American news coverage for more than forty-four years, “The Chronicle” has successfully reported on, gathered, recorded, told and printed about the penetrating known and invisible stories of the Black experience, both locally and nationally, with unquestioned verve and tenacity.

Chronicle staffers Barney Blakeney, Hakim Abdul-Ali and Damion Smalls sat on the panel