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Debate Heats Over South African White Privilege

Members of the opposition Democratic Alliance (DA) are reportedly squabbling over a casual remark by the head of the party, Mmusi Maimane, who observed that white privilege and black poverty were critical issues that needed to be addressed. “I firmly stand by comments I made on Freedom Day,” Maimane tweeted on Sunday. “South Africa remains…

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After Years in Exile, a ‘Fritter Seller’ Plots Political Comeback

Ending four years in political exile, Dr. Joyce Banda, once demeaned as a mere “fritter seller”, returned this week in full form, risking possible arrest as she greeted crowds of joyous supporters at the Blantyre airport and in her home town. The second woman to lead an African country and the first woman president in…

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Nigerian Leader Promised Banned Military Aircraft At Meeting With Trump

At a long-awaited meeting between President Donald Trump and Nigerian President Muhammadu Buhari, the U.S. president announced the approval of a dozen war planes for Nigeria whose sale had been frozen by former President Barack Obama. Rebuking his Nigerian counterpart for the proliferation of violence throughout that country, Trump expressed concern for “the burning of…

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South African Women Take Prize For Anti-Nuclear Effort

Using the knowledge gained in the anti-apartheid struggle, two South African women challenged a secret, multibillion-dollar nuclear deal that would have dotted South Africa with nuclear power plants from Russia. The women, Makoma Lekalakala and Liziwe McDaid, waged a five-year court battle against the plants. Against all odds, including a secret agreement between Russian leader…

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More African Nations Discard Term Limits and Let Leaders ‘Rule for Life’

Absent any influence from the White House towards democratic reforms, a number of African leaders are quietly tweaking their laws to ensure a lock on the presidency for decades to come. Fifteen of Africa’s 54 heads of state hold or have held power for more than 20 years. Yet Africa has the world’s youngest population…

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Major Unrest Tests South African President Only Three Months Into Office

South African President Cyril Ramaphosa cut short his appearance at the Commonwealth leaders’ summit in London after rising citizen anger at corruption and poor public service at home exploded into violence. South African police fired rubber bullets at protestors while shops were looted, roads were blocked and vehicles set on fire. Some 23 people were…

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Obama to Deliver 16th Mandela Lecture in South Africa

Former president Barack Obama will deliver the annual Nelson Mandela memorial lecture at a 4,000-capacity arena in Johannesburg in July. Obama met with Mandela in 2005 and eulogized him at his death five years ago, saying “(Mandela) makes me want to be a better man.” The lecture marks 100 years since the birth of the…

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With Winnie Gone, ANC Loses Its Grip

As Winnie Madikizela-Mandela was lovingly laid to rest with full state honors, her beloved country was being buffeted by published reports of a massive diversion of monies from the most vulnerable people, to whom she dedicated her life, to the wealthy. Among the victims of the apparent looting of government funds are black farmers in…

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Their Nightmare Ended, Freedom for the Nigerian ‘Chibok Girls’ Remains Out of Reach

Nearly four years after militants attacked a rural school and kidnapped over 200 girls in a well-planned raid, the nightmare has ended for about 100 Nigerian girls. Young women now, they study at a private school and grapple with life as a former “Chibok girl.” “I’m back, as they say,” Hauwa Ntakai told a newspaper…

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Israeli Opposition Dooms African Refugees Seeking Asylum

Thousands of African asylum seekers who reached Israel after dangerous voyages may have lost their last best hope to be released and sent to western countries or resettled in Israel after members of the Israeli coalition government trashed a negotiated asylum plan. A landmark agreement negotiated with the United Nations Commission on Refugees had been…

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Golfing While Black: Grandview Golf Club Asks Five Black Women to Leave the Club for Golfing Too Slow

By Sandra Thompson, Esq., President, NAACP York County, Pa. Branch On Saturday, April 21, 2018, I woke up excited, anticipating a round of golf at Grandview Golf Club in York, Pa. I was going to play with four ladies from “Sisters in the Fairway” (SITF), a group of about 15 professional, predominantly African American women…

State of Black America® Finds African-Americans Drastically Underrepresented in Tech Industries

By Marc H. Morial, President and CEO of the National Urban League “It is our hope that this document will pierce the dark veil of neglect that has thus far smothered efforts to right the wrongs of the past and present. It is presented as an alternative to failed public policies. I hope that it…

Checking the Narrative on Black Women’s Leadership: It’s Not Only Time to Court Black Women’s Votes, But Also Support Them As Candidates

By Glynda C. Carr and Kimberly Peeler-Allen In a recently published Rolling Stone article, recording artist Janelle Monae exposes a disconcerting, yet largely universal awareness shared by Black women seeking to exercise power: when we reveal ourselves to be human and inevitably imperfect, we are too often labeled unworthy and incapable of leading. It’s why,…

No Turning Back

By Marian Wright Edelman, President of the Children’s Defense Fund A new Government Accountability Office (GAO) report released last month, “K-12 Education: Discipline Disparities for Black Students, Boys, and Students with Disabilities,” reminds us once again that suspensions and expulsions continue at high rates and offer grave risks to students. The report by this federal…

Ungrateful, Non-voting Negroes Ignore Bloody War for Black Voting Rights

By Jeffrey L. Boney, NNPA Newswire Contributor “I’m just one vote.” “My vote won’t matter.” “Them White folks gone do what they wanna do anyway.” These are some of the many excuses given by some African Americans when it comes to exercising their right to vote; a right fought for by many people in this…

Fair Housing Act: A Milestone on the Journey to Equality

By Jeffrey W. Hicks A half-century ago, the Fair Housing Act was enacted to prohibit discrimination in housing based on race, color, creed and national origin. The law also supported the National Association of Real Estate Brokers’ (NAREB) efforts to increase black homeownership, which we believe serves to increase wealth and other economic outcomes for…

Memorial Day: “Who Else But A Soldier”

By Beverly Gadson-Birch   Special recognition goes out to our veterans and those who sacrificed their life in the name of freedom.  Each year as we observe Memorial Day, I am reminded of my dad and his appreciation of veterans. Dad wasn’t a veteran; but he never missed the opportunity on Decoration Day to take…

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Discipline Determines Destiny

By Barney Blakeney   Two phone calls over the past couple of weeks again got me thinking about Black folks taking the initiative to determine our own destiny. I’ve got a thing on my desk that says “Discipline, not desire, determines our destiny”. Wish I woulda, coulda, shoulda doesn’t get it done. We must exercise…

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Muslim Women Embrace Ramadan

By Hakim Abdul-Ali   The world’s almost two billion adherents of the Islamic faith began their annual month-long fasting period today. It’s the time of the year when sincere Muslims fast from dawn to sunset each day,abstaining from food, water and having sex with their spouses during the daily fasting period and also performing extra…

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Respect Builds Character and Business

By Beverly Gadson-Birch Two Black men appropriately dressed enters Starbucks to meet a friend to discuss business over a cup of coffee and find themselves handcuffed and carted off to jail. Why? They asked to use the restroom without making a purchase. Really? At one of this country’s most prestigious institutions, Yale, a White student…

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Thirty Years After Her Death Septima Clark Still Teaches

By Barney Blakeney The May 3 unveiling of the marker noting the birthplace of Septima Poinsette Clark was more powerful than I thought it would be. The College of Charleston coordinated the event that included a luncheon and portrait unveiling honoring a woman too few realize was responsible for contributing to much of what America…

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Hailing the Mothers of Our Culture

By Hakim Abdul-Ali Next Sunday in the good old USA, there will be an observance day usually set aside for  the yearly recognition and valued appreciation of the past and present mothers in our lives. Traditionally, it’s called Mother’s Day. With the greatest respect to all the women in America, who are mothers of their…

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Celebration or Ritual?

  By Dr. William Small, Jr. The practice of effectively organizing and celebrating the importance of events is validated by its existence in all cultures. Celebrations on their face speak to values which define and affirm a people. Christmas, Columbus Day, the Fourth of July, for example all say something about the soul and character…

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A Public Call for School Board Members to Dismantle Racial Barriers in Education

The status of public education in Charleston County has been the subject of intense though warranted scrutiny by a high-profile report, “The State of Racial Disparities in Charleston County, South Carolina 2000-2015.” Dr. Stacey Patton, a professor of History and Journalism at Morgan State University and acclaimed author, published the report in consultation with the…

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The Fine Line

  By D.R.E. James I imagine my demeanor to be something like Drake’s on the cover of his magnum opus Take Care. Head down, by his lonesome in the corner of Joso’s dining room. Except at Henrietta’s, I’m not in Toronto. I’m on the wickered, patioed Parisian-feeling patio of Henrietta’s. My waiter greets me; his…

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Fairness

Right and wrong are words that are not applicable to today’s society. We live from day to day in complete denial about what these words really mean. Today as I sat in church I was given a new word: Fair. I came home and referred to Webster for the clear definition of fair:  free from…

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Discussion With The Chronicle

“The Chronicle” is a revered institution in the Charleston Black community, with loyal readers and subscribers of all ethnicities. As the Palmetto state’s recognized leader in African-American news coverage for more than forty-four years, “The Chronicle” has successfully reported on, gathered, recorded, told and printed about the penetrating known and invisible stories of the Black experience, both locally and nationally, with unquestioned verve and tenacity.

Chronicle staffers Barney Blakeney, Hakim Abdul-Ali and Damion Smalls sat on the panel