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South African Leader Sees End to Racism and Bigotry

President Cyril Ramaphosa struck a note of optimism in his message on Dec. 16 – the Day of Reconciliation and the anniversary of two major historical events, now celebrated as a public holiday. Since the nation attained democracy, he said, citizens have showed the capacity to look beyond their differences ‘in the quest to achieve…

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Five Tech Giants Linked To ‘Cruel And Brutal Use Of Children’ In Congo Mines 

Do kids work in coal mines? In 1910, an estimated 2 million American children under the age of 15 were working in factories and mines for low wages and long shifts. Photographs by Lewis Hine of New York revealed the depraved exploitation of children, some as young as 8 years of age, in fields and…

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Home Of Struggle Icon Winnie Mandela Is Now A Museum

The modest home of the late Winnie Madikizela-Mandela in Brandfort, Free State, where she was forced to live when banished in 1977, has become a museum. The Winnie Madikizela-Mandela Brandfort House Museum in Majwemasweu, Brandfort, is now complete, the national Department of Sports, Arts and Culture announced this week. Arts and Culture Minister Nathi Mthethwa…

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“It’s All Fake News” Complains President Of Zambia About Devastating Media Expose

Fake News! No, that’s not our President condemning the critical voices of media. That troubling phrase was deployed by Zambian President Edgar Lungu, complaining about local coverage of the plunder of valuable, increasingly scarce Mukula rosewood trees – and hence, the destruction of Zambia’s vulnerable forests. President Lungu was particularly incensed by a report naming…

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Part 2 – A Quest for Garifuna Visibility in America’s Census

By Khalil Abdullah Washington, D.C. (Ethnic Media Services) – Gilberto Amaya is a descendant of Africans of various tribes captured and transported in the 1700s to St. Vincent and the Grenadines in the Caribbean. Though intended for the harsh yoke of servitude, they ran the ships aground, then escaped inland where they intermarried with the…

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South African Beauty Queen Crowned Miss Universe 2019

By Stacy M. Brown, NNPA Newswire Senior Correspondent @StacyBrownMedia Zozibini Tunzi said she grew up in a world where a woman who looks like her, was never considered beautiful. On Sunday, December 8, the South Africa beauty queen was crowned Miss Universe. “I grew up in a world where a woman who looks like me,…

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Climate Activists At Madrid Summit Denounce Inaction By World Leaders

As the 25th United Nations climate conference moved into its second week, environmental activists from around the world denounced the influence of corporate power plainly visible at the Madrid summit and took to the streets in a massive climate protest led by indigenous leaders and youth. The summit — known as COP25, or conference of…

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Major Peace Prize Awarded To Human Rights Activist From Western Sahara

The Right Livelihood Award, widely known as the ‘Alternative Nobel Prize’ goes to five human rights activists this year. Among them is Aminatou Haidar of the Western Sahara. Ms. Haidar receives the Right Livelihood Award “for her steadfast nonviolent action, despite imprisonment and torture, in pursuit of justice and self-determination for the people of Western…

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PART I: A Quest for Garifuna Visibility in America’s Census

By Khalil Abdullah, Ethnic Media Services Gilberto Amaya’s career in international development has taken him across more than 30 countries as he implemented renewable energy systems, agribusiness projects, and poverty alleviation initiatives. He witnessed post-independence struggles of sovereign states whose names are rarely heard on U.S. nightly newscasts — Burkina Faso, Togo, Zambia, Zimbabwe. A…

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South Africans Mark World Aids Day With New ‘Wonder’ Drug

On the occasion of World Aids Day, South African health minister Zweli Mkhize announced the roll-out of a new state-of-the-art antiretroviral drug which, he said, should drastically reduce the number of people living with HIV. The roll-out could start as soon as this month. A modified three-in-one pill was hailed as a ‘game-changer’, much needed…

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Useful Guidelines for Action from Ancestral Warriors

By A. Peter Bailey (TriceEdneyWire.com) – As we enter into a new year and a new decade, it will be to our advantage to pay much closer attention to serious guidelines from some of our most brilliant and committed ancestral warriors. In alphabetical order, they include the following: Lerone Bennett, Jr.-“The Black middle class can…

Opportunity Grows for Entrepreneurs in 2020

By Ashley D. Bell Regional Administrator, U.S. Small Business Administration (Black PR Wire) A new year brings new opportunity. As we celebrate the 2nd year of the Tax Cuts Jobs Act, small businesses are well positioned to grow and prosper.  The year end-review highlights include more than 7 million jobs created since November 2016, and…

Will Money Rule In This Presidential Race?

By Julianne Malveaux (TriceEdneyWire.com) – Democrats started this Presidential campaign season with more than 20 candidates. Eventually, it dropped to about a dozen, with, so far, only five of those “qualified” to appear on the next debate stage. But debate performance doesn’t seem to matter much. Both Senator Kamala Harris and former Obama cabinet member…

“Living Legend” Tom Joyner’s Career has Transformed Black Media

By Marc H. Morial (TriceEdneyWire.com) – “I learned so much about building a community around content from Tom Joyner. That show was so good at finding commonality within a diverse audience — yes, there is diversity within blackness — and serving many wants and needs simultaneously. It’s hard to be entertaining, informative and educational without…

The danger of the “ethno-nationalist” state

By Bill Fletcher, Jr., NNPA Newswire Contributor One of the most common features of right-wing populist and fascist movements is the demand for ethnic and/or racial purity. During the course of the 20th century we saw it in its most egregious forms in colonial and white minority regimes in the global South, and in the…

Looking to 2020 — Put Your Vote to WORK!

By Ray Curry, Secretary-Treasurer, UAW If you work for a living but are somewhat up in the air about who to vote for in 2020 or for that matter, if you should even bother getting to that crowded polling place, I’d like to ask that you indulge me for a minute. Because I’ve got a…

Christmas Memories of Old Schoolers

By Beverly Gadson-Birch After attending two old schoolers funerals in two days, I woke up in rewind mode. After arriving home from the funeral service of one of the last surviving moms from my old neighborhood and checking my phone messages, another old school mom passed away. I don’t know if the deaths are contributing to my…

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Healthcare Makes Me Sick!

By Barney Blakeney Better to have and not need, than to need and not have. I last week had a medical procedure done. Healthcare costs, ya’ll! As the Democratic primary closes in – Saturday, February 29 is the date of the election – I’m pressed to figure out what the candidates stand for and who…

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The Virtues of Respect Reaches Home

By Hakim Abdul-Ali I was thinking the other day about the  values of expressing common decency among one another while in a discussion with another soul. I call showing that expression respect. Today’s topic was suggested to me by a Euro-American lady who reads The Chronicle at her job. She saw me last Saturday at…

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Charleston County School Board: Hitched the horse back up to the wagon

By Beverly Gadson-Birch Charleston County School Board made some sweeping educational changes at its regularly scheduled Board of Trustees meeting December 16. The changes were long overdue and were put in place to address years of concerns regarding inequities and biases from stakeholders–parents, students, ministers, community organizations and activists. The Board’s Strategic Education Committee unveiled its…

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Your Vote, Your Voice, Your Future

By Barney Blakeney Okay, I promise this will be my last column about the November 5 municipal elections – or maybe not. I’m still seething about the performance of Black voters. It seems too many of us just don’t get it. I’m convinced the power of education, economics and politics will set my people free.…

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Mr. Garvin’s Courteous Wisdom

By Hakim Abdul-Ali Please forgive me as I attempt to expound on a somewhat disappearing “hue-man” trait in interpersonal communication that I find sorely missing today. That trait is one of simply being courteous. As I travel and move about in my day-to-day activities, I come in contact with and meet, for the most, some…

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Domestic Violence Awareness Month 2019

In 2019, Ebony Clare was shot and killed in South Carolina. Her husband, Romaine Clare was arrested. www.abcnews4.com. Brandon Clark, 21, allegedly killed 17-year-old Bianca Devins, then posted photos of her body on the gaming site Discord, according to a 2019 article in USA Today. A man who had a history of domestic violence with his…

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Volunteer/Mentor

I applied to be a mentor at multiple high schools in Charleston via West Ashley High School’s Raptor Program. I wanted to know if any programs existed specifically designed for troubled students, i.e., those who are repeatedly in Saturday school, detention, facing constant suspensions, or near expulsion. I’m interested in anything dealing with youth rivalries, violence,…

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Rural communities are in the middle of the immigration crisis

By Gladys Godinez, community organizer, Center for Rural Affairs More than 600 people were detained on Aug. 7, 2019, in small rural towns in the state of Mississippi by Homeland Security Investigations (HMI) and Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE). As was evident last month in Mississippi, resources such as interpreters and immigration attorneys are limited…

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What You Need to Know About Interventions

Dealing with loved ones can be difficult sometimes and that only gets harder when they have a problem with drugs and alcohol.  A big part of dealing with a loved one’s addiction is getting them into treatment. But what if they are unwilling to go? Intervention is the next logical step, however what is an intervention and…

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Carolina Stories: "Charlie’s Place" tells the story of an African American nightclub in Myrtle Beach that was a significant stop on the Chitlin’ Circuit in the segregated South

Discussion With The Chronicle

“The Chronicle” is a revered institution in the Charleston Black community, with loyal readers and subscribers of all ethnicities. As the Palmetto state’s recognized leader in African-American news coverage for more than forty-four years, “The Chronicle” has successfully reported on, gathered, recorded, told and printed about the penetrating known and invisible stories of the Black experience, both locally and nationally, with unquestioned verve and tenacity.

Chronicle staffers Barney Blakeney, Hakim Abdul-Ali and Damion Smalls sat on the panel