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With Winnie Gone, ANC Loses Its Grip

As Winnie Madikizela-Mandela was lovingly laid to rest with full state honors, her beloved country was being buffeted by published reports of a massive diversion of monies from the most vulnerable people, to whom she dedicated her life, to the wealthy. Among the victims of the apparent looting of government funds are black farmers in…

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Their Nightmare Ended, Freedom for the Nigerian ‘Chibok Girls’ Remains Out of Reach

Nearly four years after militants attacked a rural school and kidnapped over 200 girls in a well-planned raid, the nightmare has ended for about 100 Nigerian girls. Young women now, they study at a private school and grapple with life as a former “Chibok girl.” “I’m back, as they say,” Hauwa Ntakai told a newspaper…

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Israeli Opposition Dooms African Refugees Seeking Asylum

Thousands of African asylum seekers who reached Israel after dangerous voyages may have lost their last best hope to be released and sent to western countries or resettled in Israel after members of the Israeli coalition government trashed a negotiated asylum plan. A landmark agreement negotiated with the United Nations Commission on Refugees had been…

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Presidential Race Takes An Unexpected Twist In Nigeria

Next year’s race for the presidency in Nigeria just got a lot more interesting as a crusading journalist – an upstart known for exposing the millions and billions stolen by a national “loot-ocracy” – announced his candidacy for the nation’s top job. As news spread that the journalist, Omoyele Sowore, was testing the waters for…

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LGBT Activists Plan First-ever Pride March in Swaziland

LGBT activists in Swaziland are taking hopeful steps towards official recognition in the conservative nation of Swaziland, where male homosexuality is outlawed and members of the government have denounced it as “satanic.” The activists hope to win over some hearts and minds by holding a Pride march and festival in June. If the application by…

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Opposition Warns of ‘Fire and Fury’ to Halt U.S. Military Expansion in Ghana

Ghanaians are hopping mad over plans to expand the U.S. military presence in the country, spending millions on training and equipment in a move which could draw terrorists to the peaceful country. At a recent rally for “Ghana First”, opposition groups organized by the Ghana First Patriotic Front marched in the streets of the capital,…

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In South Africa, Pain and Shock at Passing of Winnie Madikizela Mandela

Tributes to anti-apartheid icon Winnie Madikizela Mandela filled the South African radio air waves this week as news of her untimely passing reached the far corners of the nation and the continent. Heart-rending classics from the American songbook – from The Song for Mama by Boyz to Men to Donny Hathaway’s A Song for You…

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Liberians in the U.S. Facing Mass Deportation

Liberians living in America since a devastating civil war that took 250,000 lives are now in the crosshairs of the current Trump administration, which is threatening to lift their protected status and deport them. Some five thousand people nationally are protected from deportation under the Deferred Enforced Departure or DED program which has been in…

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African Free Trade – A New Dawn for Africa?

In what was described as a “new dawn for Africa,” leaders from 44 of the 55 countries of the continent ceremoniously signed a trade pact creating a huge single market from Cape Town to Cairo. The national leaders agreed to eliminate cross-border tariffs and make border posts more efficient. Twenty seven countries signed an additional…

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Cuban MDs Head to Kenya to Teach and Learn

Following a health agreement signed last year, 100 Cuban doctors will travel to Kenya to fill gaps in specialty care at Kenyan hospitals. Fifty Kenyan doctors will be sent to Cuba for specialized training. Kenyan Cabinet Secretary for Health Sicily Kariuki said the visiting personnel would include critical care physicians – family physicians, physicists, oncologists…

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Studying Black Identity in South Africa Transformed My Worldview

By Chiagoziem “Sylvester” Agu, Albany State University Of the more than 330,000 U.S. students studying abroad, only 6.1 percent are African American and 10 percent are Latino. This is one in a series of articles by students of color who are breaking down barriers by studying abroad thanks to the Frederick Douglass Global Fellowship, which awards…

Rev. Barbara Skinner and Intergenerational Leadership

By Julianne Malveaux (TriceEdneyWire.com) – Barbara Williams Skinner, at 75, looks at least two decades younger than her birth certificate suggests. Much of her youthful energy is due to her discipline, which includes a mindful prayer practice, a vegetarian diet, and a focused mind. But as much of her youthfulness, I think, can be attributed…

Early Voting and Expanded Absentee Voting are Key to Fair Elections

By Marc H. Morial (TriceEdneyWire.com) – “Georgia elections officials deployed a known strategy of voter suppression: closing and relocating polling places. Despite projections of record turnout, elections officials closed or moved approximately 305 locations, many in neighborhoods with numerous voters of color. Fewer polling places meant that the remaining locations strained to accommodate an influx…

Refugees

By Bill Fletcher, Jr., NNPA Newswire Contributor The hysterics in connection with the Central American refugees seeking asylum in the USA would, under other circumstances, be comical. A few thousand people seeking to enter a country of 350 million people and Trump tell us to panic and prepare for armed action. International human rights law…

The Devastation of Voter Suppression

By Dr. E. Faye Williams, Esq. (TriceEdney Wire.com) – As we’ve looked at the races for U.S. Senate and Governors of States, many of us are absolutely certain the wrong person was credited with the victory. Looking at all the voter suppression that so brazenly took place in the last Presidential race and the races mentioned…

Dear Black People: Adoption is a Great Option

By Nsenga K. Burton, Ph.D., NNPA Newswire Entertainment and Culture Editor November was National Adoption Awareness Month, which came about as an effort to encourage families to consider adopting children in the foster care system. First introduced in 1976 by then Massachusetts Governor Michael Dukakis as National Adoption Week, who wanted to help find forever homes for…

Allowing Elected Officials To Stick Us With Debts

By Barney Blakeney With the November 6 general elections looming, a couple of items that came across my desk in the past week seem more important – a request by the S.C. National Action Network for investigations into the former Charleston Naval Hospital property sale and redevelopment and rate reductions for SCE&G customers. Voters should…

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Apology For Slavery Not Accepted (Until Whites Come Up With A Comprehensive, Compensatory Plan)

By Beverly Gadson-Birch   I have given this apology for slavery a lot of thought. Upon hearing the City of Charleston Councilmembers apologize for slavery, I immediately texted and asked a friend, “what now?” Now that you have apologized, what do you plan to do about the subjugation of a class of people—my people, descendants of…

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A Brighter Upside of Yourself

By Hakim Abdul-Ali A few weeks ago I wrote an article called “Suicide and Lessons Learned”. The article was and is self-explanatory, and I’ve been blessed to have so many folk reach out to from beyond The Chronicle’s zip code to thank me for putting into print my vibes on that all-too-real issue. Everyone seemed…

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Montford Point Marines – A Moment In Time For James Campbell

By Barney Blakeney They say there aren’t enough hours in the day. For years, I thought my lack of sufficient time to get stuff done was due to my time management – setting priorities and scheduling accordingly. I’ve come to think no matter how well you do those things, when you’ve got a lot of…

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About “The Apology”…

By Barney Blakeney I try to stay away from ‘hot topics’ when writing this column. I figure if everybody else is talking about a subject, how much more can I add? But a friend and regular reader of this diatribe said she is interested to see what I have to say on the subject of…

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Coming Together as One

By Hakim Abdul-Ali  I was out of town recently and I came across a truly wonderful sight. It was a scene where I witnessed an elderly Afro-American male and female couple lovingly walking hand in hand and clearly enjoying each other’s company. It made me stopped immediately in my tracks and in my reminiscent way…

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Are We Kidding Ourselves?

By Dr. William Small, Jr.     Black History Month is or should be a season for the recognition and celebration of the gains and accomplishments of African descendant peoples throughout the Diaspora. The times dictate that we cannot continue to be primarily concerned with the culture and contribution of Black people in America. In…

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Black Dollar$ Matter

By James Johnson    Surely we’ve all heard it said before that “It takes money to make money.” While we may all have different opinions regarding this statement, it does hold some degree of truth. In order to attain thorough understanding of this, we must foremost acknowledge the essentiality of money. Regardless of who you…

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History Has its Eyes on Us: What Will We be Judged On?

By Thetyka Robinson, contributing writer Eugene Woods, President and CEO of Carolina’s HealthCare System, opened up his keynote address at the YWCA’s 17th Annual Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Business and Professional Breakfast with a warm smile and charismatic energy. He shared what he had learned through his friend, who was smitten for Charleston and…

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Order in the Court

By James Johnson    Foremost, I must express my deepest condolences to the entire Scott family as they continue to grieve the loss of their beloved Walter Scott and seek justice on his behalf. It is with the utmost respect to you all that I pen these words. My sole intention is to generate much…

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Carolina Stories: "Charlie’s Place" tells the story of an African American nightclub in Myrtle Beach that was a significant stop on the Chitlin’ Circuit in the segregated South