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Human Rights Trampled in Burundi, Rights Groups Charge

A president who once banned the popular pastime of jogging now aims to rewrite the nation’s laws and rule the nation of Burundi until 2034. A referendum is scheduled to take place this week that would give President Pierre Nkunrunziza two more terms of 7 years each. President Nkurunziza, 54, has strong support from his…

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Court Denies Nigerian Fishermen ‘Access To Justice’, Rights Groups Say

A coalition of human rights, environmental and development groups from the four corners of the world is challenging a UK appeals court ruling that lets UK-headquartered parent companies escape liability when people in poor countries are harmed by their affiliates. The ruling stems from a lawsuit by the Ogale people in Nigeria against Royal Dutch…

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Burundi Vote Could Undo Delicate Hutu-Tutsi Balance

As U.S. President Trump unravels carefully crafted legislation at home, the newly-passed referendum in Burundi may unravel a balance of power between Hutus and Tutsis, worrying some experts in diplomacy. The finely-tuned Hutu-Tutsi ethnic balance, defined in the 2000 Arusha agreement, helped end Burundi’s civil war, say policy strategists at the International Crisis Group. Under…

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Women’s Group Plead For Clemency For Sudanese Teen Sentenced To Hang

A Sudanese court has upheld a judgment of execution for a teenage girl who fought off the forcible sexual advances of her arranged-marriage husband, leading to his death. Noura Hussein has been imprisoned in Omdurman, Sudan, since the murder of the man she was forced to marry, who she says raped her as his relatives…

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Experimental Drug Gets Green Light For New Ebola Outbreak

The Ebola virus, which took thousands of lives in West Africa, has resurfaced in central Africa. This time, health officials are ready to put an experimental drug to the test. The outbreak, which has caused at least 19 deaths and 39 confirmed and suspected cases, was reported in the Democratic Republic of the Congo’s (DRC)…

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Did Trump Meet His Match in President of Nigeria?

Try as he might, President Trump couldn’t land a deal with Nigerian leader Muhammadu Buhari at their tête-à-tête in Washington last month. Deploying his usual tough talk on trade, the U.S. president was shooting for a deal that would open the doors to U.S. farm products by “ripping down” Nigerian trade barriers that protect the…

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Zimbabwean Musician Returns From Exile

After 14 long years in the U.S. state of Oregon, singer, composer and bandleader Thomas Mapfumo has come home to Zimbabwe. His recent performance, for some 20,000 ticket holders at the open-air Glamis Arena, only slowed down as the sun began to rise. “I thought maybe I wasn’t going to be able to come back…

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A Call For Justice For African Children

Children are very much on the political and public agenda across Africa today. The African Union has adopted a charter to protect them and a mechanism to hold governments accountable for the fulfillment of their rights. Even so, the reality on the ground is somber and sobering. The number of child prisoners continent wide is…

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Debate Heats Over South African White Privilege

Members of the opposition Democratic Alliance (DA) are reportedly squabbling over a casual remark by the head of the party, Mmusi Maimane, who observed that white privilege and black poverty were critical issues that needed to be addressed. “I firmly stand by comments I made on Freedom Day,” Maimane tweeted on Sunday. “South Africa remains…

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After Years in Exile, a ‘Fritter Seller’ Plots Political Comeback

Ending four years in political exile, Dr. Joyce Banda, once demeaned as a mere “fritter seller”, returned this week in full form, risking possible arrest as she greeted crowds of joyous supporters at the Blantyre airport and in her home town. The second woman to lead an African country and the first woman president in…

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Dear Black People: Adoption is a Great Option

By Nsenga K. Burton, Ph.D., NNPA Newswire Entertainment and Culture Editor November was National Adoption Awareness Month, which came about as an effort to encourage families to consider adopting children in the foster care system. First introduced in 1976 by then Massachusetts Governor Michael Dukakis as National Adoption Week, who wanted to help find forever homes for…

Republicans, The Party of Whiteness in 2018

By Roger Caldwell In 2018, all Americans would like to believe that racism is over, and the society is moving toward equality and certain inalienable rights for everyone. Both parties, the Democrats and Republicans should respect every American based on the content of their character, as opposed to the color of their skin. But with…

DeVos hid student loan repayment abuses for 18 months

By Charlene Crowell In February 2017, the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau (CFPB) sued Navient Corporation and two of its subsidiaries for allegedly using shortcuts and deception to illegally cheat 12 million borrowers out of their rights to lower loan repayments. These practices, according to CFPB, led to an additional $4 billion in borrower costs. Forbearance is…

Election 2018 and A Free Press

By Ed Gray, North Dallas Gazette Senior Columnist The midterm election results have been processed, and now I have had some time to evaluate the results. One take away from these elections was that President Donald Trump’s attack on the American free press, must end. The Trump Era remains, and uncivility is the norm. This…

Can a Woman’s Coalition Survive Petulant White Women?

By Julianne Malveaux I have had about enough of some white women! First, fifty-three percent of them vote for an odious genital-grabber. Then, they organize a woman’s march with momentum from the #MeToo movement, founded by Tarana Burke, but co-opted by white women like the wanna-be activist Alyssa Milano who was a mediocre actress back…

Trump’s Racism By Omission: Rude Theatrics Targeting Black Reporters Overshadows Questions on Voter Suppression

By Caleb Gayle April Ryan, White House correspondent for American Urban Radio Networks, and other journalists of color have not been favorites of President Donald Trump. From telling Ryan to set up a meeting with the Congressional Black Caucus when she asked if he planned to meet with black members of Congress to calling her…

3D Printers: Gun Control, Out of Control

By Beverly Gadson-Birch  I am fascinated by high-tech gadgets but even more fascinated by 3D printers. It’s just mind-boggling the things you can make using 3D-printers. I am clueless how a 3D printer can make a gun as small as a Liberator and as large as an AR-15 assault weapon. On one hand, legislators are working…

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The Keen Wisdom of Marcus Garvey

By Hakim Abdul-Ali   If you’ve read my views over the past two decades you undoubtedly know that I champion the continual study of learning about Black “Our-story,” no matter what time of the year that it is. It’s part of who I am as a thinking brother of color and as a believer in…

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Prioritize Protests

By Barney Blakeney With all the hullabaloo about the Palmetto Rose Kids, ignored in the discussion is workforce training for grown folks. While the issues of Black kids selling Palmetto Roses is important and speaks to a lot of pivotal issues in our society, focusing on kids selling handcraft is like treating a festering sore…

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Parents, Y’all Need To Get A Handle On Your Teens

By Beverly Gadson-Birch Hot temperatures are no stranger to the Lowcountry.  It’s been an unusually hot and humid summer. It’s something about the heat that makes folks go haywire. While the heat is on the rise, so is teenage violence.  Last week a 15-year-old shot and killed a 17-year-old and another 17-year-old, Zamere Raeguel Treawn…

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Thinking of Dr. King in Fighting Ignoble Causes

By Hakim Abdul-Ali I’ve been thinking about the states of political turmoil and civil unrest that’s going on throughout the world, including the United States of America. There’s a lot of unhappiness that permeating the landscapes of democracy and beyond. I’m now asking myself who really is at fault for the terrible political mess that…

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Kids Count, But Not Enough

By Barney Blakeney For years I’ve done an annual story about the Kids Count report. The report is compiled by the Annie E. Casey Foundation, a national organization that since 1948 monitors and reports on the well-being of children. My former editor, Jim French used to provide me a hard copy of the report each…

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Jeff Sessions has done more damage in his first 100 days than his boss

By Hanna Kozlowska US attorney general Jeff Sessions may not be part of the biggest investigation in the Department of Justice, but as he reaches 100 days in office, there’s little doubt that he’s had an important impact on the American criminal-justice system-potentially for years to come. Despite the political turmoil of the Trump administration,…

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What the CBO Score Means for South Carolina

“There is a mean spirit rampant in our country that would have us punish our most vulnerable citizens for simply being poor, old, sick, or holding down well-paying jobs,” said Steve Skardon, Jr., executive director of Palmetto Project. “It suggests that if these people are starved long enough or allowed to be a bit sicker,…

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Does the DeVos Education Budget Promote “Choice” or Segregation?

By Kimberly Hall and Michael Hilton The American public education system should provide an equal opportunity for all students to receive a quality rigorous education – regardless of class, race or ethnicity. In direct opposition to this goal, the Fiscal Year 2018 education budget recommendations from the Trump Administration show an effort to limit opportunities,…

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Homage to Sarah Buncum Simmons: Mother’s Day 2017

By Ade Ofunniyin, PhD It has been nearly five years since I began my work with Gullah Society and African Burial Grounds. My interest was spurred by a visit to the gravesite of my ancestor William Simmons Senior. The late Mr. Simmons is the grandfather of my grandfather Philip Simmons. William Simmons Sr., his son…

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June is Black Music Month: Benny Starr & FOUR20s - "Resurrection" NPR Tiny Desk Submission 2019