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Nation Faced With Rising Suicides Among Young and Old

South Africa’s rising suicide rate is in the spotlight as the World Health Organization marks World Suicide Prevention Day. According to the Men’s Foundation of South Africa, 450 men take their lives every month with four out of five deaths being the result of suicide. Last month, Professor Bongani Mayosi succumbed to the pressures of…

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Brazil Museum Tallies Up African Antiques Lost in Fire

A fast-moving fire that swept Brazil’s National Museum on Sept. 2 incinerated priceless objects and reduced hundreds of African antiquities to ash, museum official are now saying. The museum’s permanent African exhibit was named Kumbukumbu – a Swahili word for the memory of people, objects and experiences. A throne from the Kingdom of Dahomey (current-day…

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African Critics See Dark Side To China’s ‘Charitable’ Loans

There are two sides to every coin and two widely opposing views on China’s offer of generous loans and grants to African countries announced at the recent Forum on China-Africa Cooperation forum in Beijing. At the confab, with representatives from 53 of 54 African countries, sky-high numbers were bandied about. Chinese President Xi Jinping announced…

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Ugandan Leader Tarnished By Torture of Reggae Pop Star

Images of a popular reggae music star in a wheel chair holding crutches have raised questions of whether Ugandan President Yoweri Museveni ordered the arrest and torture of the star-turned-parliamentarian, Bobi Wine, who attended a recent rally of the opposition in the town of Arua. Museveni was forced to release the star for treatment in…

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Guerrilla War Rages Between Big Oil and Institutions of the Art World

A growing number of museums in Europe are turning thumbs down on oil company dollars when the companies not only contribute to global warming but fund the “science” that supposedly disproves it. Oil company funding also misleads public perception of environmental devastation as in Nigeria where billions of dollars were made extracting oil while highly…

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Decades-Old Case Revives African Demand For Stolen Lands

  When colonial powers redrew borders in Africa and picked choice lands for themselves and less desirable land for everyone else, some of those deals remained through this century. Few were undone. This week, a case before the International Court of Justice (ICJ) will decide if colonial deals that redrew African borders can be declared…

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Thousands of Settlers Face Eviction in Kenya to Save Trees

Some 40,000 settlers in the Maasai Mau forest in Kenya face imminent eviction by the Kenyan government which says it is protecting the forest in the name of conservation. Deputy President William Ruto said those who encroached on the forest should be flushed out but in a humane manner. “We respect every Kenyan’s rights. No…

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Kenyan Leader Signs U.S. Trade Deal To Finance Wind Power Plant

Kenya has signed agreements with a US wind energy company, providing a major boost for wind power and food security. Mr. Kenyatta said the ‘Big Four agenda’ projects – boosting manufacturing industry, promoting food security, providing affordable housing and universal healthcare coverage – present major opportunities for local and foreign investors. The Overseas Private Investment…

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Land Fever Sweeps Southern Africa, Pressing Governments To Act

The day of reckoning is arriving in Southern Africa for the hundreds of thousands of blacks whose lands were taken forcibly by white settlers – a crime that goes unpunished despite promises for land reform year after year. Pressure is growing on governments to take action and return ancestral lands to their original owners. But…

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South African Activist Takes The Reins At Amnesty International

Longtime social justice activist Kumi Naidoo began his four-year tenure this week as head of the rights group Amnesty International with a vision for the group to be “bigger, bolder and more inclusive.” In his first message as Secretary General on August 16, Naidoo said that Amnesty International “is now opening its arms wider than…

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Black Boys Need Rites of Passage Programs in 2019 Across the Country

By Roger Caldwell 2019 is important to African American Men because the opportunities are boundless and amazing. If you can conceive it, you can achieve it. The only barriers holding Black men back are preparation, knowledge and education. The challenge for Black men is Black manhood. There are many different definitions of manhood, but to…

CFPB Makes Move to Support Payday Lenders During Black History Month

By Charlene Crowell, Communications Deputy Director with the Center for Responsible Lending and NNPA Newswire Contributor Each February, Black History Month commemorates the unique American experience of Blacks in America. This year marks the 400th anniversary of the Jamestown, Virginia arrival of captured and shackled Africans. In the ensuing years, as slavery grew, so did the…

In a Perfect World

By Dr. E. Faye Williams (TriceEdneyWire.com) – In a perfect world, for a State of the Union address (SOTU), we likely would’ve heard a president who actually made sense and who likely would’ve been truthful even if we disagreed with the content of what he said. We’ve learned to set a low bar for #45;…

Embracing My Imperfections Studying Abroad in London

By Chinwendu L. Maduegbunam, Fayetteville State University Growing up in North Carolina, I was shy and my need to be perfect in everything I did made it difficult to connect with others. I always thought I had to be perfect: playing basketball, earning high grades, being the perfect daughter, etc. I feared how others would judge…

Moments and Migrations

By Julianne Malveaux (TriceEdneyWire.com) – Every year the Association for the Study of African American Life and History (ASALH) choses a theme for Black History Month. This year they have chosen, Black Migrations emphasizing “the movement of people of African descent to new destinations and subsequently to new social realities.” Their theme is important, especially…

For Black Children, Attending School Is an Act of Racial Justice

By Kayla Patrick, The Education Trust As a seemingly twisted way to ring in 2019, the Trump administration has sent a loud and clear message that it’s okay for educators and school leaders to keep Black children out of school buildings and exclude them from opportunities to learn. It may sound extreme, but that’s exactly what…

Living In A Fantasy

By Barney Blakeney I grew up in the 1960s reading comic books. My younger brother and I bought hundreds of them using the nickels and dimes we earned doing household chores. My lil brother became quite the collector. I was drawn to the fantasy of superheroes. Despite that, all the superheroes I read about were…

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Election Results: “We Be Comin’ Round The Mountain”

By Beverly Gadson-Birch There is one week left before the final vote is cast and the winners are announced. And, there have been some knock down, drag out arguments over the best candidates and even some who I thought may have been the best candidate for office fell short in the debate.    I hope…

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Thinking Out Loud in Fall

By Hakim Abdul-Ali   It’s that time of the year when the leaves of autumn will soon be falling from the trees in many sectors of our country. The only thing I can say about this phenomena is that it’s spectacularly wonderful. So, as I begin to process my upcoming thoughts for this week’s article,…

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Do The Work, Pay Attention Before Elections!

By Barney Blakeney   We’re down to the wire with just under two weeks before the 2018 general elections and I’m still undecided about a lot of the races. People keep telling us we must be informed voters, but it’s so hard getting good information. It’s a lot of work! I guess there’s only one…

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2018 Midterms: The Hope is in the Vote!

By Beverly Gadson-Birch   This is not one of those git down, sit down quizzical kind of articles you have grown accustomed to over the years. Sometimes we just need to talk about issues as they impact US. And no, US means you and me, African Americans, not the United States; but, I am sure…

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For the Love of Seeking Knowledge

By Hakim Abdul-Ali  I’m a self-professed lover of collecting books and other items. I always have been that way, and I’ll probably will remain that way until the day I take my last breath. While on that rather personal theme of expression, I’m thinking about something that I’d like to share with you today about…

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Education starts with parents but has to include schools to be successful

By Cheryl Cromwell Civil rights trailblazer and educator, Septima P. Clark, said, “I believe unconditionally in the ability of people to respond when they are told the truth,” I share in this belief and the truth, presented in the new data released by Charleston RISE, is that 80 percent of Charleston’s African American third graders who were…

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A Change is Gonna Come – Must Come!!!!!

By John Singletary, Candidate for Mayor of North Charleston Congratulations to Reggie Burgess and his recent promotion to Chief of Police for The City of North Charleston.  It is especially worth noting that Chief Burgess is the first African American Police Chief in the history of The City of North Charleston, since the city’s incorporation…

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Charleston’s Landscape of Memory: The Gentrification of History

By Robert R. Macdonald The Charleston History Commission’s effort to formulate wording for a plaque intended to place the monument to John C. Calhoun on Marion Square in historical context is comparable to placing a band-aid on a cancerous lesion. The wound here is the landscape of memory presenting a mythical Charleston past almost totally…

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League of Women Voters and the 2018 CCSD School Board Elections

By Melinda Hamilton, League of Women Voters of the Charleston Area President Consider a revolution. It’s time. Start by thinking of 113,000 children, the area’s economy and one of the toughest public service jobs around. What’s the connection? The 113,000 children are students in public schools in Berkeley, Charleston and Dorchester counties. Sooner or later…

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Carolina Stories: "Charlie’s Place" tells the story of an African American nightclub in Myrtle Beach that was a significant stop on the Chitlin’ Circuit in the segregated South