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Experimental Drug Gets Green Light For New Ebola Outbreak

The Ebola virus, which took thousands of lives in West Africa, has resurfaced in central Africa. This time, health officials are ready to put an experimental drug to the test. The outbreak, which has caused at least 19 deaths and 39 confirmed and suspected cases, was reported in the Democratic Republic of the Congo’s (DRC)…

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Did Trump Meet His Match in President of Nigeria?

Try as he might, President Trump couldn’t land a deal with Nigerian leader Muhammadu Buhari at their tête-à-tête in Washington last month. Deploying his usual tough talk on trade, the U.S. president was shooting for a deal that would open the doors to U.S. farm products by “ripping down” Nigerian trade barriers that protect the…

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Zimbabwean Musician Returns From Exile

After 14 long years in the U.S. state of Oregon, singer, composer and bandleader Thomas Mapfumo has come home to Zimbabwe. His recent performance, for some 20,000 ticket holders at the open-air Glamis Arena, only slowed down as the sun began to rise. “I thought maybe I wasn’t going to be able to come back…

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A Call For Justice For African Children

Children are very much on the political and public agenda across Africa today. The African Union has adopted a charter to protect them and a mechanism to hold governments accountable for the fulfillment of their rights. Even so, the reality on the ground is somber and sobering. The number of child prisoners continent wide is…

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Debate Heats Over South African White Privilege

Members of the opposition Democratic Alliance (DA) are reportedly squabbling over a casual remark by the head of the party, Mmusi Maimane, who observed that white privilege and black poverty were critical issues that needed to be addressed. “I firmly stand by comments I made on Freedom Day,” Maimane tweeted on Sunday. “South Africa remains…

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After Years in Exile, a ‘Fritter Seller’ Plots Political Comeback

Ending four years in political exile, Dr. Joyce Banda, once demeaned as a mere “fritter seller”, returned this week in full form, risking possible arrest as she greeted crowds of joyous supporters at the Blantyre airport and in her home town. The second woman to lead an African country and the first woman president in…

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Nigerian Leader Promised Banned Military Aircraft At Meeting With Trump

At a long-awaited meeting between President Donald Trump and Nigerian President Muhammadu Buhari, the U.S. president announced the approval of a dozen war planes for Nigeria whose sale had been frozen by former President Barack Obama. Rebuking his Nigerian counterpart for the proliferation of violence throughout that country, Trump expressed concern for “the burning of…

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South African Women Take Prize For Anti-Nuclear Effort

Using the knowledge gained in the anti-apartheid struggle, two South African women challenged a secret, multibillion-dollar nuclear deal that would have dotted South Africa with nuclear power plants from Russia. The women, Makoma Lekalakala and Liziwe McDaid, waged a five-year court battle against the plants. Against all odds, including a secret agreement between Russian leader…

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More African Nations Discard Term Limits and Let Leaders ‘Rule for Life’

Absent any influence from the White House towards democratic reforms, a number of African leaders are quietly tweaking their laws to ensure a lock on the presidency for decades to come. Fifteen of Africa’s 54 heads of state hold or have held power for more than 20 years. Yet Africa has the world’s youngest population…

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Major Unrest Tests South African President Only Three Months Into Office

South African President Cyril Ramaphosa cut short his appearance at the Commonwealth leaders’ summit in London after rising citizen anger at corruption and poor public service at home exploded into violence. South African police fired rubber bullets at protestors while shops were looted, roads were blocked and vehicles set on fire. Some 23 people were…

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End Cruelty to Immigrant Families and Children

By Marian Wright Edelman, President of the Children’s Defense Fund “We can’t let people drive wedges between us … because there is only one human race.”      –Dolores Huerta, Co-founder, United Farm Workers July 26 was the deadline set by a court for the Trump administration to reunite all children and parents who were cruelly separated…

The Criminalization of Poverty: Cash Bail for Non-Violent Misdemeanors Perpetuates Unequal Treatment Under the Law

By Marc H. Morial “The rich man and the poor man do not receive equal justice in our courts. And in no area is this more evident than in the matter of bail … The man who must wait in jail before trial often will lose his job He will lose his freedom to help…

Trump Loves the Anthem and Flag, Hates the Constitution

By Dr. Wilmer J. Leon, III (TriceEdneyWire.com) – “You have to stand proudly for the National Anthem. You shouldn’t be playing, you shouldn’t be there. Maybe they (NFL Players) shouldn’t be in the country… We’re proud of our country and we’re proud of our flag…Wouldn’t you love to see one of these NFL owners, when…

The Sin, Hypocrisy and Racism of White Privilege

By Austin R. Cooper, Jr., NNPA Newswire Contributor The U.S. Constitution gives three eligibility requirements to be president: one must be 35 years of age, a resident within the United States for fourteen years and a natural born citizen. The term “natural born citizen” is not defined. Based on these criteria, I cannot argue that…

What the Supreme Court Nomination Would Mean for Black Women

By: La’Tasha D. Mayes, MSPPM, Executive Director, New Voices for Reproductive Justice With the confirmation process underway for Judge Brett Kavanaugh’s nomination to the Supreme Court, Black women have certainly been voicing our opposition. There’s no sugar-coating it: confirming Brett Kavanaugh to the Supreme Court would be disastrous for Black women. To begin, Kavanaugh has made it clear that he doesn’t support the right to abortion enshrined in Roe v.…

Jim Crow 2018

By Jeffrey L. Boney, NNPA Newswire Political Analyst From 1880 to 1965, there was an all-out assault on preventing African Americans from voting by having their right to vote deemed invalid. The Fifteenth Amendment prohibited blatant disenfranchisement on the basis of race or prior enslavement, but many Southern states came up with a slew of…

Allowing Elected Officials To Stick Us With Debts

By Barney Blakeney With the November 6 general elections looming, a couple of items that came across my desk in the past week seem more important – a request by the S.C. National Action Network for investigations into the former Charleston Naval Hospital property sale and redevelopment and rate reductions for SCE&G customers. Voters should…

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Apology For Slavery Not Accepted (Until Whites Come Up With A Comprehensive, Compensatory Plan)

By Beverly Gadson-Birch   I have given this apology for slavery a lot of thought. Upon hearing the City of Charleston Councilmembers apologize for slavery, I immediately texted and asked a friend, “what now?” Now that you have apologized, what do you plan to do about the subjugation of a class of people—my people, descendants of…

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A Brighter Upside of Yourself

By Hakim Abdul-Ali A few weeks ago I wrote an article called “Suicide and Lessons Learned”. The article was and is self-explanatory, and I’ve been blessed to have so many folk reach out to from beyond The Chronicle’s zip code to thank me for putting into print my vibes on that all-too-real issue. Everyone seemed…

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Montford Point Marines – A Moment In Time For James Campbell

By Barney Blakeney They say there aren’t enough hours in the day. For years, I thought my lack of sufficient time to get stuff done was due to my time management – setting priorities and scheduling accordingly. I’ve come to think no matter how well you do those things, when you’ve got a lot of…

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About “The Apology”…

By Barney Blakeney I try to stay away from ‘hot topics’ when writing this column. I figure if everybody else is talking about a subject, how much more can I add? But a friend and regular reader of this diatribe said she is interested to see what I have to say on the subject of…

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Coming Together as One

By Hakim Abdul-Ali  I was out of town recently and I came across a truly wonderful sight. It was a scene where I witnessed an elderly Afro-American male and female couple lovingly walking hand in hand and clearly enjoying each other’s company. It made me stopped immediately in my tracks and in my reminiscent way…

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Jeff Sessions has done more damage in his first 100 days than his boss

By Hanna Kozlowska US attorney general Jeff Sessions may not be part of the biggest investigation in the Department of Justice, but as he reaches 100 days in office, there’s little doubt that he’s had an important impact on the American criminal-justice system-potentially for years to come. Despite the political turmoil of the Trump administration,…

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What the CBO Score Means for South Carolina

“There is a mean spirit rampant in our country that would have us punish our most vulnerable citizens for simply being poor, old, sick, or holding down well-paying jobs,” said Steve Skardon, Jr., executive director of Palmetto Project. “It suggests that if these people are starved long enough or allowed to be a bit sicker,…

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Does the DeVos Education Budget Promote “Choice” or Segregation?

By Kimberly Hall and Michael Hilton The American public education system should provide an equal opportunity for all students to receive a quality rigorous education – regardless of class, race or ethnicity. In direct opposition to this goal, the Fiscal Year 2018 education budget recommendations from the Trump Administration show an effort to limit opportunities,…

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Homage to Sarah Buncum Simmons: Mother’s Day 2017

By Ade Ofunniyin, PhD It has been nearly five years since I began my work with Gullah Society and African Burial Grounds. My interest was spurred by a visit to the gravesite of my ancestor William Simmons Senior. The late Mr. Simmons is the grandfather of my grandfather Philip Simmons. William Simmons Sr., his son…

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National Poetry Month Spotlight - The Revolution Will Not Be Televised: Gil Scott Heron