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Whereabouts of Ailing Presidents of Gabon in Debate

Gabonese President Ali Bongo is receiving medical treatment in London after his health deteriorated during a visit to the city, according to people familiar with the matter. But news of the absent president was immediately contradicted in an official press release this week in a pattern common to many ailing leaders. The leader of this…

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Surviving the Journey: Thousands Gather in a Weekend of Reflection and Healing to Remember, Honor the First Africans Brought as Captives to English North America 400 Years Ago

By Brian Palmer Special from the Richmond Free Press (TriceEdneyWire.com) – As day broke last Saturday, August 24, tides of people of all ages and colors flowed down the promenade at Hampton’s Buckroe Beach. Some were dressed for a day at the shore in shorts and T-shirts, with windbreakers or sweats. Others, all of them…

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400 Years in Virginia. 500 Years in Slavery.

By Stacy M. Brown, NNPA Newswire Correspondent @StacyBrownMedia In August 2018, the National Newspaper Publishers Association began a series on the transatlantic slave trade. The series started in conjunction with the annual United Nations International Day of Remembrance.  With the observance of the first African landing in America, some question whether it’s the 400th or 500th anniversary.…

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Reframing the History of Slavery in Angola and the U.S.

If the U.S. has 35,000 museums, a writer asked in 2014, why is only one about slavery? And if the wealth of this country was built on the backs of enslaved people from Africa, why has that story been vastly under-reported in our media, in our schools and in our political discourse? The first question…

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Water Mission Preparing to Provide Safe Water to Communities Impacted by Hurricane Dorian

Water Mission, a nonprofit Christian engineering organization, is mobilizing to provide safe water to the Bahamas in response to the widespread flooding and devastation caused by Hurricane Dorian.   One of the strongest storms ever recorded in the Atlantic, Hurricane Dorian brought sustained winds of over 185 miles per hour, storm surges of around 20 feet, and nearly 30 inches of rainfall to various parts of the Bahamas. Dorian made…

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Leader In Women’s Issues To Head U.N. AIDS Program

The U.N’s office on AIDS has named a longtime activist on women’s issues to head the global health agency. Ugandan humanitarian Winnie Karagwa Byanyima’s career began as a member of parliament in the National Assembly of Uganda. She became the Director of Women and Development at the African Union Commission and worked on the Protocol…

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Activist Villagers Sickened By Diamond Slag To Confront Mineowner In Court

Since the first diamonds were found in the 1930s, the villagers of Kono, in the eastern region of Sierra Leone, have seen the wealth under their feet make others rich. Instead of joy, the shiny stones have left a trail of contaminated water, pockmarked mud brick houses, and countless other indignities. Adi Kalie Bangura, a…

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National and World Leaders Convene In Virginia to Commemorate the 400th Anniversary of the First African Landing in English North America

This weekend the 2019 Commemoration of the First African Landing was hosted by Virginia’s 2019 Commemoration, American Evolution, in partnership with Fort Monroe Authority, Fort Monroe National Monument, and the City of Hampton. Thousands of people from around the world gathered at a commemorative ceremony at Point Comfort in Hampton, Virginia, which is the site where “20 and odd” enslaved African…

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Fires Engulfing West Africa Exceed Those Of Brazil

While all eyes are on the fast-moving flames in the Brazilian Amazon, satellite data is showing a record 6,902 blazes in Angola in the past 48 hours. Brazil is actually third in the world in wildfires over the last 48 hours, according to satellite data analyzed by Weather Source. Angola’s fires compare to 3,395 in…

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NAACP Observes 400th Anniversary of Slave Trade in Journey from Jamestown to Jamestown

By Stacy M. Brown, NNPA Newswire Correspondent @StacyBrownMedia On Sunday, August 18, the NAACP began a journey to honor African ancestors. Members of the storied civil rights organization and numerous guests boarded a bus from Washington, D.C. Their initial destination was Jamestown, Virginia’s Colonial National Park, where they held a prayer vigil and candle lighting…

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Flying While Black: Stop the U.S. Congress from Raising Air Travel Taxes

By Dr. Benjamin F. Chavis Jr., President and CEO National Newspaper Publishers Association Working families in the African American community and beyond have a hard-enough time keeping up with daily expenses. Every mortgage payment, car payment, trip to the grocery store, stop at the gas station, or utility bill that shows up in the mail…

DeVos Hands For-Profit Colleges $11.1 Billion Over 10 Years

By Charlene Crowell  Most consumers would likely agree that consumers should get what they pay for. If a product or service fails to deliver its promises, refunds are in order.   That kind of thinking guided the Obama Administration’s decision to address false promises made to student loan borrowers.   A rule known as the “borrower defense to repayment”, came on the heels of successive for-profit college closures that left thousands of students stranded…

Disarm Hate

By Marian Wright Edelman On August 2 I wrote about the relentless scourge of gun violence and the two children killed in Gilroy, California and asked: Why does gun violence remain a uniquely horrible American epidemic and why does it go on and on and on and on? Two days later a new shooting made…

Please Bring School Supplies

By Julianne Malveaux (TriceEdneyWire.com) – The event promised to be one of those last-gasp of summer events that would raise a little money for a good cause. The young woman who called to tell me about it promised that I’d meet interesting people, enjoy excellent wines and that the cost of attending was modest. “We…

Calls for Justice for a Black Immigrant

By Dr. E. Faye Williams In an article, titled “A Clarion Call for Racial Justice Reaches the Highest Level,” Rev. Jesse Jackson brought to light “the story of an immigrant, an internationally praised economist, and a whistleblower that exposed a $16 billion fraud against American taxpayers all wrapped in one person.” The immigrant is Dr. Yonas…

Five Years After Michael Brown’s Death: Despite Visible Progress, Racial Disparities Persist in Ferguson

By Marc H. Morial (TriceEdneyWire.com) – “The city’s personal-responsibility refrain … reflects many of the same racial stereotypes found in the emails between police and court supervisors. This evidence of bias and stereotyping, together with evidence that Ferguson has long recognized but failed to correct the consistent racial disparities caused by its police and court practices,…

The Virtue of Being “Keen Eyed”

By Hakim Abdul-Ali Today’s message is one for the “keen eyed” among us. I don’t know if “keen eyed” is an acceptable term in the parlance of today’s Americanisms, but I don’t mind because it’s something that I, hopefully, want to use to get my point across. Speaking frankly and thinking provocatively as I sometimes do,…

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Backdoor Toms are like cockroaches

By Beverly Gadson-Birch The closer we get to the mayoral election in North Charleston, the more I am reminded of an article I wrote on “cockroaches”. Yes, sir! There are two things that really get under my skin—cockroaches and Uncle Toms. In a way, there isn’t too much difference between the two. I don’t know how y’all…

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Change Gon’ Come

By Barney Blakeney I was sitting on the steps with some of the fellas a few days after the August 8 murder of a man on the Eastside’s Hanover Street. Subject of the day – “The Eastside will change!” People have been killed at that corner before, but this is different,” said Art. “This time…

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Are You a Lion or a Hunter?

By Hakim Abdul-Ali An old Afrikan proverb states, “Until the lions write their own history, the tale of the hunt will always glorify the hunter.” That’s a remarkable truth within itself, and its a prompting wakeup call to me as it should be to the senses of any aware Afro-conscious and all other well meaning folk…

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What’s (Really) Going On?

By Hakim Abdul-Ali It’s almost the end of the summer season and the world is going through all kinds of perturbing chaotic and anarchist directions. And in the good old USA, from the monotonous and truly tedious “poly-tricks” of boring candidates running for elective offices to openly racist cries of bigoted nationalism gone amuck, we witness…

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Don’t Be Fooled By Green Grass – There Still Is A Need For Rural Missions

By Barney Blakeney I learned some time ago Rural Missions, Inc. on Johns Island was closing. Last week I learned it closed May 31. A lot of people likely don’t understand the role Rural Missions, Inc. played in our community. Unfortunately, too many people don’t even know it existed! That’s a sad commentary. I learned…

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New Voting Machines

With less than two month before voting starts in Charleston County, the public has not been informed that new machines will be used. We are happy the new machines will allow voter verification, but such transitions must allow more lead-time for voter training. In 2015 Charleston County Election Commission Reports showed some precincts with 114%…

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Black Women in South Carolina Deserve Equal Pay

By Elected Black Women, SC General Assembly Today, August 22, marks Black Women’s Equal Pay Day. Far from a celebration, this day represents how far Black women nationwide had to work into 2019 to match what white, non-Hispanic men earned in 2018. Nationally, Black women working full-time, year-round earned 61 cents for every dollar earned…

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Benny Starr Hosts Mo’ Better Brunch at Blue Note Bistro

My fondest childhood memories growing up in rural Berkeley County, South Carolina are filled with music. I recall the soulful voices of Whitney, Otis, Michael—Shirley Caesar, all leaping from my mother’s stereo and into my mind’s eye. These voices held a majestic quality and sounded as if they came from someplace far off. On Saturdays,…

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African Americans Saved Cadillac

At the turn of the 20th century, the automobile entered the American scene. During that period there was a proliferation of car manufacturers. In 1903 alone 57 companies came into existence and 27 went bankrupt. Over the years numerous models were introduced that are now a distant memory. Studebaker and Hudson come to mind. But the Cadillac, introduced in…

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Carolina Stories: "Charlie’s Place" tells the story of an African American nightclub in Myrtle Beach that was a significant stop on the Chitlin’ Circuit in the segregated South

Origin of Porgy & Bess

 

This story is also told in Fordham’s book “True Stories of Black South Carolina”