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Silicon Valley African Film Festival celebrates its 10th anniversary with 85 films from 35 countries

The 10th Annual Silicon Valley African Film Festival (SVAFF) will be held at the Historic Hoover Theatre in San Jose from Friday, October 4 through Sunday, October 6, 2019. The annual showcase includes a mix of feature films, shorts, documentaries and animations from seasoned and emerging African filmmakers. SVAFF celebrates its tenth anniversary with a…

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Affluent Society Blamed For Speed Up In Removal Of Kenyan Forest

Since independence, natural resources in Kenya have been on a fast track to extinction. Today, nearly half of all its forests are gone, resulting in more droughts, floods and other dire consequences for communities, ecosystems, food security and infrastructure. From 10% of the country covered in forest in 1963, noted Kaluki Paul Mutuku, Youth4Nature Regional…

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Zimbabwe Doctors Protest Abduction Of Popular Union Head

Hundreds of doctors marched through Harare this week to condemn the abduction of their union leader. They said they would not return to work until Peter Magombeyi, the acting president of the Zimbabwe Hospital Doctors Association (ZHDA), was found. The doctors believe Magombeyi was abducted by the security forces because of his role in organizing…

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Ghana’s First President Predicted Black-On-Black Troubles In Africa

Ghana’s first president, Kwame Nkrumah, warned as far back as the 1960s that political independence from European colonial oppressors without economic independence was a recipe for disaster. Nkrumah, who authored “The struggle continues,” Class Struggle in Africa” and “Neo-colonialism – the last stage of imperialism,” among others, was deeply aware of the threats faced by…

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SCPA, industry partners send supplies to the Bahamas

A group of port and maritime industry partners came together to send critical supplies to the Port of Freeport on Grand Bahama Island following Hurricane Dorian. The hurricane wreaked havoc on the Bahamas. Thousands had their homes destroyed and thousands remain without electrical power or running water. Essential services are impaired, and many transportation routes are inaccessible.…

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From Libya To Rwanda, Refugees Shuttled To New Outpost In Plan Called ‘Flawed’

European nations are building a wall – a sea wall – to keep African migrants from reaching their shores. With funds paid by the European Union and cooperating African governments, refugees are being sent to distant centers where they are expected to make their asylum appeals. Rwanda has just signed on to hold some 500…

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Local Minorities Fared Well During Hurricane Dorian – Not So In The Bahamas

By Barney Blakeney One former Charlestonian now living in New York City, N.Y. called to check on friends and family after Hurricane Dorian struck the area. In the past minority communities were the last served by restoration efforts. That would be unlikely today since gentrification has transformed much of the Charleston region, he speculated. Local…

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Bahamas Facing Long Road to Recovery but Cleaving to Hope Amidst Devastation

By Barrington M. Salmon (TriceEdneyWire.com) – Chris Laville remembers looking out of the window of his apartment, thinking it might not turn out too bad. “It was early in the morning. It had rained and there was a light breeze,” Laville recalled in an interview with the Trice Edney News Wire. “I woke saying we…

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Post-Independence Leader of Zimbabwe Robert Gabriel Mugabe Passes

There are two sides to every story and the same could be said of the legacy of Zimbabwe’s first post-independence leader, Robert Gabriel Mugabe, who passed away Sept. 6 at the age of 95. “Mugabe’s legacy will continue to be contested between those who revere him and those who revile him,” wrote lawyer and award-winning…

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Violence Rains Down On Nigerian And Other African Businesses In Johannesburg

As state-sponsored violence threatens Latinos in the U.S., xenophobia is again threatening Nigerians and other Africans whose shops in Johannesburg are being targeted for looting and destruction by unknown groups. The latest spate of violence broke out in suburbs south of Johannesburg’s city center and spread to the central business district. More than 50 mainly…

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Republican Senate Stands in the Way of Moving America Forward

By Jesse Jackson (TriceEdneyWire.com) – Americans are disgusted that Washington has become dysfunctional, even as Americans struggle with ever greater challenges — from stagnant wages and growing inequality to catastrophic climate change to soaring health-care costs to a decrepit and dangerously aged infrastructure. President Donald Trump blames House Democrats, saying they are “getting nothing done…

Memo to Candidates: We Need a Plan for the Affordable Housing Crisis

By Marc H. Morial (TriceEdneyWire.com) – “The lack of affordable housing is perhaps the greatest challenge to successfully ending homelessness and lifting millions of people out of poverty … This administration’s callous attempts to rollback funding for affordable housing and homelessness assistance programs has left more than half a million people without shelter on any…

Debt collectors target consumers of color, people making less than $50K

By Charlene Crowell A new survey asked likely voters across the country what they thought of a proposed debt collection rule. The response was strong and broad opposition.   Proposed earlier this year by Consumer Financial Protection Bureau (CFPB) Director Kathleen Kraninger, the rule would authorize debt collectors to expand how often consumers could be contacted as well as…

Ask the Question: When Are We Going to End Child Poverty in America?

By Marian Wright Edelman “No child living in America today should have to worry about whether they’ll have a place to sleep at night or enough food to eat. But these are daily realities for the 1 in 6 poor children in this country. Children like me.” These are the words of 18-year-old Children’s Defense Fund-Minnesota…

#MeToo Doesn’t Count Against Abusive Cops?

By Richard B. Muhammad Over the last three years, there has been an explosion of stories, prosecutions and demands that men, powerful men, be held accountable for the sexual abuse of women who are in vulnerable positions, often seeking employment or job advancement. Lawmakers have lost positions, movie producers and celebrities have faced prosecution, CEO…

What Does a Just America Look Like?

By Dr. E. Faye Williams, Esq. (TriceEdneyWire.com) – Sometimes I allow myself to imagine a world with justice for all—not just in words, but by deeds. Before I go around the world with what I would like to see I want the best there is for everybody no matter where they live. Maybe to some…

Vote: Time For Major Changes

By Beverly Gadson-Birch I founded a program back in the early 80’s, along with six volunteers, called Scholars for Excellence. It was a motivational program for students in grades 1-6.  The impetus really came from working with Operation Push and the Push Excel Program out of Chicago under Rev. Jesse Jackson. I often reflect on our…

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From The Storm Rises Winds Of Opportunity

By Barney Blakeney As Charleston ramps up efforts to assist in the recovery of the Bahama Islands after their recent devastation by Hurricane Dorian, in a Monday conversation about relief efforts John Wright president of the African American Settlement Communities Historic Commission, Inc. outlined an unprecedented proposal that would move assistance to the Bahamas beyond…

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The Importance of Today’s Black Press

By Hakim Abdul-Ali I want to openly thank all of you who support the nation’s Black Press, especially the loyal supporters of The Charleston Chronicle, an Afro-American weekly news organ that I’ve had the pleasure of writing for, covering many different areas over a long journalistic career. It’s been an enhancing and rewarding labor of…

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Elections: Good vs. No Good

By Beverly Gadson-Birch There are some really good folks running in both the City of Charleston and North Charleston elections; but, it’s going to take more than just “good”. Well, what is “good”. Can you be good and no-good at the same time? You can be from a good home and folks may think you are…

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Riders Of The Storm

By Barney Blakeney This week has been difficult. My aunt Sarah Lees Cooper, a former Williamsburg County teacher ,used to say “Getting old is a blessing. But it’s so inconvenient.” My personal recovery from Hurricane Dorian again proves how true her assessment is. I’ve in the past prided myself on riding out hurricanes. Though neither…

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Hurricane Dorian’s Signs About Life

By Hakim Abdul-Ali Hurricane Dorian has come and gone, and it has left a wrath of destruction in many parts of the globe where it touched down, most notably and tragically in parts of the Bahamas. Many other sectors of southeastern USA and Atlantic Canada were touched by this super powerful hurricane, and all those…

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Human Beings of All Races, Colors, Nationalities, Languages, and Faiths Should Lead the Eastside Charleston Community

By Mateusz Wojnarowicz My name is Mateusz Wojnarowicz, I’m 14 years old, and I recently read an article on The Post and Courier newspaper website that said the Eastside Community Development Corporation needs to “recruit whites.” Okay. Can someone explain to me what exactly does “recruit whites” mean? You don’t recruit just blacks or just…

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Let’s Support Our Bulldogs!

We’re asking everyone to show their support for the football team and the Athletic Department this school year (2019-2020). You can show your support to the athletes by donating to the Athletic Department and by coming out to support the athletes at the games. This year all of the home football games will be played…

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New Voting Machines

With less than two month before voting starts in Charleston County, the public has not been informed that new machines will be used. We are happy the new machines will allow voter verification, but such transitions must allow more lead-time for voter training. In 2015 Charleston County Election Commission Reports showed some precincts with 114%…

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Black Women in South Carolina Deserve Equal Pay

By Elected Black Women, SC General Assembly Today, August 22, marks Black Women’s Equal Pay Day. Far from a celebration, this day represents how far Black women nationwide had to work into 2019 to match what white, non-Hispanic men earned in 2018. Nationally, Black women working full-time, year-round earned 61 cents for every dollar earned…

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Carolina Stories: "Charlie’s Place" tells the story of an African American nightclub in Myrtle Beach that was a significant stop on the Chitlin’ Circuit in the segregated South

Origin of Porgy & Bess

 

This story is also told in Fordham’s book “True Stories of Black South Carolina”