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With Fela Kuti, Drummer Tony Allen Created The Afrobeat Sound

Pioneering drummer for many decades, Tony Allen was a musical partner of the Nigerian singer, composer and activist Fela Anikulapo-Kuti. He passed away in Paris at age 79. Allen was the drummer and musical director of Fela’s band Africa ’70 and was one of the primary co-founders of the Afrobeat sound. As Fela sharpened his…

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U.N. Unveils Fight Against A Fake News ‘Infodemic’ That Puts Lives At Risk 

While Americans hotly debate the subject of “fake news,” Africans and others around the world marked a day for reflection on press freedoms in theory and in practice. The theme for this year’s event launched by the U.N. agency UNESCO was “Journalism without fear or favor”. The state of journalism in most parts of the…

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Catastrophic Floods, Linked To Human Activities, Submerge Lake Victoria Region

Pounding rains over the last two months have set off catastrophic flooding of biblical proportions, surging over the weekend into some 20 of the 47 Kenyan counties bordering Lake Victoria – a massive trans-boundary body of water shared by Kenya, Tanzania and Uganda. Some 23 rivers empty water into the lake. “These floods are the…

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Africans Mourn the Passing of a Distinguished Thinker and Two Outstanding Artists

While the rate of fatalities in Africa is still much below that of developed countries, every life lost is a library gone, according to the saying. Here are three noted Africans who passed this year just as thousands of lives were tragically lost to a virus worldwide. Dr. Mansour Khalid, a prolific author in both…

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Kenyan Growers Send ‘Flowers Of Hope’ As  Major Markets Dry Up

It was inevitable during a lockdown that sales of Kenya’s flower exports would dry up as buyers make fewer impulse purchases of carnations, roses and other blossoms. According to data from the Kenya Flower Council, sales of cut flowers in overseas markets have fallen below 35 percent of what is expected this time of the…

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Young Kenyan Brothers Ease COVID-19 Mask and Clean Water Shortages

Journalists who step out of their high-floor offices or manage to escape from their coronavirus confinement sometimes find a great story right on the street below. Such was the story discovered by Kevin Phillips Momanyi, a reporter with Kenya’s Tuko news channel. His piece, titled the “Unsung Heroes such as of the Majengo slums,” profiled…

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African Climate Groups Denounce Bank Funds For ‘Exceptionally High-Risk’ Pipeline

A climate justice movement of over 100 major organizations in Africa and abroad has joined hands to press the African Development Bank (AfDB) to drop its support of an “exceptionally high-risk project” that threatens the livelihoods of millions of people in East Africa. In a letter to the Bank President, leaders of environmental and social…

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Sharp Rise in Deportations From China and Saudi Arabia

Saudi Arabia has deported close to 3,000 Ethiopian migrant workers to Addis Ababa, over the objections of the United Nations migration agency. An internal U.N. memo seen by Reuters said the Saudis were expecting to deport 200,000 Ethiopians in total. Other Gulf Arab states, Kenya and other neighboring countries are also expected to repatriate migrants…

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Team of Chinese Coronavirus Specialists Meet Wall of Opposition in Nigeria

A small team of China medical specialists headed for Nigeria is meeting stiff opposition from Nigerian medical groups who call the visit “an embarrassment” to hard-working doctors in the country. The visit by the Chinese specialists was announced last Friday by the Nigerian Minister of Health, Dr. Osagie Ehanire. He said they were coming to…

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Desperate U.S. Relief Agency Seeks Personal Protective Gear From Poor Countries

An unexpected “urgent request” from the USAID relief agency has popped up where least expected – on the desks of aid groups around the world that work with refugees and poor people. The U.S. agency asked them to find medical supplies and personal protective gear against the coronavirus that could be made available to the…

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Ida B’s Pulitzer – Both Too Late and Right on Time

By Julianne Malveaux (TriceEdneyWire.com) – Exactly one hundred and thirty-six years to the day after Ida B. Wells was thrown off a Chesapeake and Ohio railroad train, she was awarded a Pulitzer Prize special citation for her “outstanding and courageous reporting on the horrific and vicious violence against African Americans in the era of lynchings.” …

The Murder of Ahmaud Arbery — and Our Continuing Terror

By Jesse Jackson (TriceEdneyWire.com) – Today there is a national outcry about the murder of Ahmaud Arbery. The public condemnation has forced a belated response. Those accused of his murder finally have been arrested. His murder has become a global embarrassment for whites. For blacks, however, it is another humiliation, a continuing terror. It is the normal…

Congress Must Act Now to Deliver Relief to Cities – the Economic Engines of the Nation

By Marc Morial (TriceEdneyWire.com) – “Cities are the economic engines of the nation and home to the workers who make those engines run. The result of the growing pandemic is that most of these engines, which account for 91 percent of U.S. Gross Domestic Product and wage income, have slowed, and many have stopped. Reliable…

In America the Choice – Death, Coronavirus or the Economy

By Roger Caldwell, NNPA Newswire Contributor Under the direction and management of President Donald Trump and his coronavirus pandemic task force, there has been mass death. With over 56,000 deaths, and over one million cases of the virus, there are still no masks, limited ventilators, limited gowns, limited tests-kits and massive corruption. Instead of President…

Sowing Seeds of Life and Hope

By Marian Wright Edelman Parenting is a call and a blessing that can be a challenge under any circumstances. This has been a season like no other, but this Mother’s Day is a time to celebrate all mothers (and fathers, teachers, and caregivers) who sow seeds of life and hope for the future and pray…

Emergency Needs for Medical Deserts during COVID Pandemic

Dr. Valda Crowder, M.D., MBA According to the American Hospital Association Annual Survey, over 1,000 hospitals in our country have closed since 1975. As a result, communities from coast to coast have populations in which residents must drive more than 60 minutes to reach an acute care hospital. These places are called “medical deserts.” They exist…

Take Me Out To The Ball Game

By Barney Blakeney I can’t remember exactly when it was I first met Augustus ‘ Gus’ Holt. It was a long time ago. But over the years I found him to be giving, unselfish, appreciative and incessant. After a long battle with various health issues, Gus died April 16 at 73. Over the past few…

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We’re All Standing in the Need of Prayer

By Hakim Abdul-Ali In my view, everyday is a day of celebration because it represents a reflective spiritual occasion because, during these times of personal struggles and massive uncertainties, we all have so much to be thankful for. The living process is becoming more chaotic with each passing moment. I was thinking about what I…

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COVID-19 Virus: Educate, Educate, Educate

By Beverly Gadson-Birch One of my legendary orators of all times was Frederick Douglass. When a young man wanting to become involved asked him, what can he do. An older Douglass responded “Agitate, Agitate, Agitate”. And, one of my favorite responses for those wanting a better way of life is “educate, educate, educate”. I have been writing about…

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Black Business Yesterday, Today and Tomorrow

By Barney Blakeney Right now everybody’s focus is on Covid, but I couldn’t help noticing the other day as I rode into Charleston on I-26 how much construction is ongoing. On the peninsula east of the interstate high rise buildings lie adjacent to it. For old school natives like me, the sight is awesome. New…

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Understanding Love at All Levels

By Hakim Abdul-Ali These are still some very difficult times that the entire world-at-large is facing due to the dreaded coronavirus. Unless you’ve been on a spaceship to nowhere in particular in the last six months, you know undoubtedly what I’m referring to. In today’s message, I’m going to delve into a feeling and an…

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COVID-19 Does Discriminate

By Beverly Gadson-Birch It’s amazing how one’s life is dramatically changed at the drop of a hat. Prior to the Covid-19 virus, folks were living the American dream. Folks were on a fast track doing their thing. An average week would be wrapped around worshipping, working, shopping, writing, reading, exercising, dining out, boating, vacationing, date nights,…

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COVID-19 and Black America: Things A Vaccine Will Not Cure

By Dr. William Small, Jr. Old sayings often get to be old because they are most often true. One such saying that comes immediately to mind, suggests that when America gets a cold, Black America gets pneumonia. The current Covid-19 crisis illustrates that in spite of all of the political, social and economic progress that…

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COVID-19 is Disproportionately Impacting the Black Community; What Are Our South Carolina Officials Going to Do About it?

There is a clear racial disparity in how the coronavirus is impacting South Carolina communities. Throughout the United States and right here in Palmetto State, African-Americans are being disproportionately harmed by COVID-19. While African-Americans make up 27 percent of the state’s population, 57 percent of reported deaths and 36 percent of confirmed cases have been…

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City Councilman Sakran Response to April 15 Chronicle Article

By Jason Sakran As the newly elected Charleston City Council Member representing District 3, the past four months have been exciting, eye-opening, reaffirming and somewhat disappointing. A recent example that embodies these emotions can best be illustrated by my recent attempt to help small business owners here in Charleston in the wake of the COVID-19…

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A Radical Act of Personal Reparations

By Elaine Jenkins Merriam–Webster defines the word serendipity as “the faculty or phenomenon finding valuable or agreeable things not sought for.” That definition was made concrete for me in about 2010 when I attended a peace conference held at the United Methodist Retreat Center at Lake Junaluska, North Carolina. During one of the sessions I…

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As COVID-19 continues to spread amid a growing number of fatalities, Dr. James Hildreth said it’s critical that everyone follows stay-at-home orders, social distancing guidelines, and anything else that could help keep Americans safe during the pandemic

Origin of Porgy & Bess

 

This story is also told in Fordham’s book “True Stories of Black South Carolina”