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Teammates of U.S. Green Beret Face Murder Prosecution

More than a year has passed since the death of U.S. Green Beret Logan Melgar in Bamako, Mali. Investigators now believe they have men of interest – two Navy SEALS and two Marine Raiders. The four face charges that include felony murder in the strangulation death of Staff Sgt. Melgar. A preliminary hearing on the…

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Ahead of World AIDS Day, new UNAIDS report says “Knowledge is Power”

Ahead of World AIDS Day on December 1, the United Nations Program on HIV/AIDS has some good news and some bad news. First the bad news. In some parts of the world, West and Central Africa in particular, just getting tested for AIDS is a challenge, the NGO says. The good news? As of 2017,…

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From Africa’s Emerging Markets Come Emerging Designers

Michelle Obama is well known for discovering and supporting up-and-coming designers from a variety of backgrounds and cultural influences and bringing them to prominence. From Taiwanese-Canadian Jason Wu to Finnish Teija Eilola to Nigerian Maki Oh, the former First Lady has placed a number of designers on the world stage and catapulted their careers forward.…

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The Tale of Two Sisters: A Journey to West Africa

By Helen Frazier Less than one month ago, my sister and I traveled to the continent of Africa and visited the nations of Liberia and Ghana. Since this was my first trip visiting the “motherland”, I had no idea that it would take my sister’s knowledge after visiting twice per year for 15 years to…

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Violence Against Women – Never Acceptable, Never Ending

“I love you, that’s why I beat you.” So ends a poem by the Ghanaian writer Mariska Araba Taylor-Darko about a violent spouse and an abused woman who lays the blame of the daily beating on herself. The poem, “A Beating for Love,” takes special significance this week as many around the world mark the…

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From Refugee Camp to Medical School via Cape Town, London, and Paris

By Samixchha Raut, Rochester Institute of Technology Eight years ago, I lived in Goldhap, a refugee camp in Nepal, where more than 7,000 people reside in just over 1200 households, without running water or electricity. Today, I’m 22, a senior at Rochester Institute of Technology, majoring in Biomedical Science and on a path to achieve…

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Huge Heist By Ghanaian Bank Officers Worse Than Feared

Depositors may want to steer clear of banking in Ghana while over a dozen bank officers and shareholders face claims they lent themselves millions of dollars but failed to repay. Business Ghana, a local news outlet, reported that 13 shareholders and directors of the defunct Capital Bank Ghana Limited and UT Bank engaged in acts…

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Female Entrepreneur Breaks Cultural Barriers in Jamaica

By Lauren Poteat, NNPA Washington Correspondent Changing the way people view the country of Jamaica and its rich culture, one dancehall queen is breaking cultural barriers with her organization’s first ever international Wan Move Diaspora Experience (WMDE) Conference and festival. When Moiika Stanley, founder of the Compton, California-based entertainment law firm, “Wan Move,” decided to…

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Imamu Amiri Baraka’s Incendiary Classic ‘It’s Nation Time — African Visionary Music’ Reissued On Vinyl Via Motown/UMe

Imamu Amiri Baraka’s Pan-African manifesto It’s Nation Time — African Visionary Music, out of print since 1972, is available once again via Motown/UMe. The spoken-word jazz album, originally released on Motown Records’ Black Forum subsidiary, has been repressed on 150g black vinyl with tip-on jacket in a faithful reproduction of the original packaging. A poet,…

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Opposition Plan to Pick a Single Candidate to Defeat Kabila Implodes

As election day nears in the troubled Democratic Republic of the Congo, the seven leaders of the opposition seemed settled on one person to challenge the handpicked candidate of President Joseph Kabila – but differences unexpectedly arose. The agreement to back Congolese lawmaker Martin Fayulu Madidi, facilitated by the Kofi Annan Foundation after three days…

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Dear Black People: Adoption is a Great Option

By Nsenga K. Burton, Ph.D., NNPA Newswire Entertainment and Culture Editor November was National Adoption Awareness Month, which came about as an effort to encourage families to consider adopting children in the foster care system. First introduced in 1976 by then Massachusetts Governor Michael Dukakis as National Adoption Week, who wanted to help find forever homes for…

Republicans, The Party of Whiteness in 2018

By Roger Caldwell In 2018, all Americans would like to believe that racism is over, and the society is moving toward equality and certain inalienable rights for everyone. Both parties, the Democrats and Republicans should respect every American based on the content of their character, as opposed to the color of their skin. But with…

DeVos hid student loan repayment abuses for 18 months

By Charlene Crowell In February 2017, the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau (CFPB) sued Navient Corporation and two of its subsidiaries for allegedly using shortcuts and deception to illegally cheat 12 million borrowers out of their rights to lower loan repayments. These practices, according to CFPB, led to an additional $4 billion in borrower costs. Forbearance is…

Election 2018 and A Free Press

By Ed Gray, North Dallas Gazette Senior Columnist The midterm election results have been processed, and now I have had some time to evaluate the results. One take away from these elections was that President Donald Trump’s attack on the American free press, must end. The Trump Era remains, and uncivility is the norm. This…

Can a Woman’s Coalition Survive Petulant White Women?

By Julianne Malveaux I have had about enough of some white women! First, fifty-three percent of them vote for an odious genital-grabber. Then, they organize a woman’s march with momentum from the #MeToo movement, founded by Tarana Burke, but co-opted by white women like the wanna-be activist Alyssa Milano who was a mediocre actress back…

Trump’s Racism By Omission: Rude Theatrics Targeting Black Reporters Overshadows Questions on Voter Suppression

By Caleb Gayle April Ryan, White House correspondent for American Urban Radio Networks, and other journalists of color have not been favorites of President Donald Trump. From telling Ryan to set up a meeting with the Congressional Black Caucus when she asked if he planned to meet with black members of Congress to calling her…

Facebook Pearls Of Wisdom

By Barney Blakeney I started a Facebook account a few years ago thinking I would be another source for information. That’s worked out better sometimes than others. I’ve seen some crazy stuff on Facebook, but also have found some real pearls of wisdom. Recently I saw something about voter suppression on Facebook. The subject’s been…

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It’s Still About Seeking Clarity

By Hakim Abdul-Ali It rained this past Monday in the Lowcountry sector of South Carolina where I live, and, as usual, my mind traveled to different inquisitive areas of reminiscent thoughts reflecting my “our-storical” past. I’m like that as my mood swings as an artist, a poet and a writer took root. As I sat…

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Sorry, But No Cigar

By Barney Blakeney Well, it’s all over but the shouting. Voters went to the polls November 6 in unprecedented numbers, especially for a midterm election. That’s a good thing. But sorry, no cigar. I hate being the guy who always sees the glass as half empty. But the reality of the optimism that the glass…

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So Many Reasons to Give Thanks

By Hakim Abdul-Ali It’s that annual time of the year in the United States of America when majorities of various ethnic families gather together for the Thanksgiving Day celebration. This day of peaceful appreciation and thankful remembrance is usually held on the fourth Thursday of every November. The participating families which gather as a unit are probably…

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Uncle Tom: My People Who Are Called By My Name

By Beverly Gadson-Birch I don’t know about y’all but I am happy elections are over, at least in South Carolina they are. Payouts and gift cards for supporting candidates, who seldom deliver on their promises, days are over. Sellouts in black communities will be called out. You do a disservice to your people, people who…

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We Should Listen to the Ancestors

By Hakim Abdul-Ali Listening is difficult, but doing it intently and patiently distinguishes a leader from a follower. Today, I’m sharing quotes from past black leaders on some relevant issues that I’ve learned about by listening to those who came before me concerning the African American experience and the American cultural environment, in general. Their…

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The Misogynistic and Racist Lindsay Graham

Dear Gentlepeople Of South Carolina, I am writing because I just cannot take this racist and misogynistic political rhetoric from Lindsay Graham and the Republican Party anymore without speaking up. I am appalled that one of our own senators from our lovely state of South Carolina has decided to take a starring role in the…

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American Democracy: A View from the Mirror

By Dr. William Small, Jr. In the world of politics, both international and domestic, perhaps there is nothing more important for governments than the maintenance of the ability to self-define. This statement is very much connected to the strategy for constructing public arguments or debating, which says that once the major premise is accepted, the…

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Lesser-known broadband policy leaves rural areas out

By Johnathan Hladik, policy director, johnathanh@cfra.org, Center for Rural Affairs Connectivity is the defining aspect of our 21st century economy. Access to broadband internet offers the best in education, health care, and economic development. Unfortunately for many, the best isn’t available. More than 24 million Americans lack broadband access. This includes 31 percent of households…

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CCSD Commits to New Teacher Recruitment and Retention Strategies

By Bill Briggman, Chief Human Resource Officer, Charleston County School District For years there have been conversations about teacher compensation and questions as to whether the salary structure for teachers is competitive. While these conversations and the debate over the funding of school districts have been taking place, our teacher force has been significantly decreasing.…

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From the Sea to the Table: Episode 1 - Ray DeeZy links up with Chef George in North Charleston to learn about Gullah Cuisine, while making friend cabbage, rice, shrimp, and clams

Origin of Porgy & Bess

 

This story is also told in Fordham’s book “True Stories of Black South Carolina”