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Anonymous Threats Put Working Journalists’ Lives On The Line

Hardworking African journalists are facing threatening phone calls, cyberattacks and other forms of intimidation as they attempt to report on government dysfunction and the actions of security forces tracking terror groups. According to Reporters Without Borders, journalists around the world are seeing increased fear and violence and sub-Saharan Africa has not avoided the latest decline…

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Zimbabwe Tries Fine Or Jail To Keep Children In School

Zimbabwe is experimenting with a bold attempt to make parents prioritize education and bring down drop-out rates. Harare has amended its laws to make the first 12 years of schooling compulsory. Children are now required by law to stay in school for an extra five years to 16 years of age. It is also now…

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South Africa Cancels Promised Wage Increase, Angering Unions

Promises promises. I’m all through with promises promises. That’s the Dionne Warwick tune South African public servants will be singing bitterly if a three-year wage deal signed in 2018 is headed for the recycling bin. The promised wage hike was due to start next month, April 2020. President Cyril Ramaphosa, in his weekly newsletter, said…

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Women In Zambia In Day Of Action For ‘She Decides Day’

It’s a day of action and global solidarity. SheDecides Day takes place annually on March 2 as feminist activism is on the rise in Zambia and around the world. This year, wearing red t-shirts, some 90 young women took to the streets in a silent march through Lilongwe, Malawi’s capital. This year’s theme was ending…

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African Students Trapped In China As Home Countries Deny Re-Entry

The coronavirus is spreading fast beyond its China borders, with cases now rising in parts of Europe, Asia and the Middle East. Some 90,000 people have been infected in over 65 countries and 3,000 worldwide have died of Covid-19. As soon as the virus emerged, the World Health Organization named thirteen countries in Africa (Algeria,…

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Radical Advocate For Girls’ Health Is Freed From Prison By Ugandan Court

She’s one medical anthropologist, activist and poet you don’t want to wrestle with. Dr. Stella Nyanzi is apt to say exactly what’s on her mind – even if the object of her verbal dart is the President of Uganda, Yoweri Museveni, or his wife Janet, the First Lady. What set off the rockets this time…

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Kenya Makes Risky Bet On Pesticides To Exterminate Locust Swarm 

Desperate East African governments are weighing their options as farmers beg for the most deadly agro-chemicals in a last ditch effort against swarms of desert locusts which have already begun to eat into thousands of acres of pasture and farmland. “This is the best time to kill them,” said Mehari Tesfayohannes Ghebre, Information and Forecasting…

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Murder Charge Facing Lesotho Prime Minister Faces Constitutional Review

Murder charges against the Prime Minister of Lesotho, Thomas Thabane, will be reconsidered in light of a novel appeal for immunity to be heard by the country’s High Court. If his appeal is rejected, Mr. Thabane would be the first African leader to face domestic murder charges while in office. Mr. Thabane, 80 years of…

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Nigeria Rounding Up Journalists For Exposing Corruption

Nigeria is rounding up journalists who investigate corruption – jailing them for indefinite periods of time and accusing them of treason. Agba Jalingo, publisher of Cross River Watch, was arrested and jailed last August 2019 until this month when a Cross River court granted bail. He faces trial over a report written by the newspaper…

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Red Card For Portugal Over Racist Abuse Of Malian Soccer Star

Racism is rife in international soccer, with fans taking physical and verbal aim at players of the opposing team. After the routine apologies of the coaches and local officials, what has really been done to end the frequent racist outbursts, often accompanied by flying chairs or banana peels? This week, star striker Moussa Marega of…

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Congress rejects reversal of student loan forgiveness rule: For-profit colleges termed the “coronavirus of higher ed”

By Charlene Crowell  While much of the nation grapples with multiple adjustments attributed to the coronavirus pandemic, a rare bipartisan effort in recent days united lawmakers to reject an ill-advised Department of Education push against financial fairness for student borrowers. The lawmakers’ efforts were to allow a 2016 rule to stand unchanged.  Without the March 11th…

The Dangers of Binary Politics for the African-American Community

By Dr. Wilmer J. Leon, III (TriceEdneyWire.com) – “You can only be destroyed by believing that you really are what the white world calls a nigger…This innocent country set you down in a ghetto in which, in fact, it intended that you should perish…The limits of your ambition were, thus, expected to be set forever. You…

Sisters in STEM – Challenges and Triumphs

By Julianne Malveaux (TriceEdneyWire.com) – Few in these United States had heard of Katherine Johnson, the gifted mathematician who finished high school and college at 18. How could we know when scientists are often stereotyped as old white men wearing white lab coats, with glasses sliding down their noses? You might not have known unless…

Keep Marching to Redeem Our Nation’s Soul

By Marian Wright Edelman “Fifty-five years ago, a few of our children attempted to march from Brown Chapel AME Church across this bridge. We were beaten, we were tear-gassed. I thought I was going to die on this bridge. But somehow and some way, God Almighty helped me here. We cannot give up now. We…

Honoring Our Own Mothers

By Dr. E. Faye Williams, Esq. (TriceEdneyWire.com) – Just like Black History month, Women’s History Month started our as only a week. Along the way, we were ultimately honored with an International Women’s Day. Women around the world are celebrated that day. There’s an African proverb that tells us, “It is the women who hold…

Fair credit denials limit wealth-building for Black consumers and businesses

By Charlene Crowell For much of Black America, access to fair and responsible credit has been an elusive promise. Whether as consumers seeking the pride of homeownership or businesses seeking to begin or expand, securing credit remains an age-old, arduous and often frustrating pursuit – despite a slew of federal and state laws enacted to overcome…

“Be Prepared”

By Barney Blakeney I recently was thinking of something a friend says to me about being prepared – poor planning produces poor performance. The thought initially came to me regarding the recent three-day Southeastern Wildlife Exposition that came to town last month. Begun in 1983, each year some 40,000 visitors converge in Charleston for the…

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Respecting the Creator Alone of It All

By Hakim Abdul-Ali One thing an experienced “hue-man” understands about life after a while is that there are differences galore everywhere you turn and look in the living process. That fact alone should humble us all, including me and you, to try to exist with others, even with those who are vehemently opposed to us,…

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CORONAVIRUS: Serious Health Threat

By Beverly Gadson-Birch The Coronavirus (COVID-19) is the talk of the nation and becoming the most feared and complex virus since the HIV epidemic in the late 70’s and 80’s. Hypotheses center around the source of the virus. Where did it begin and how did it start? Since China seems to have been the birthplace, perhaps that…

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Cameras Can Record Crime, Resources Can Prevent Them

By Barney Blakeney I write little notes to myself to remind me of stuff. As I get older I don’t depend on memory as much anymore, although I still have a pretty good memory. It’s a gift that’s allowed me to work this newspaper gig. When I started reporters didn’t have voice or video recorders.…

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Who’s Better Than You?

By Hakim Abdul-Ali Today I’m just going to be very candid with my vibrations, and it’s about the negatives which so many of the world’s ethnic folk have about themselves. Yes, I’m talking about the very defeatist feelings some of these confused folk have about their very natures and auras. I always like to explain…

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Black History – Great Is Who We Are!

By Beverly Gadson-Birch As we wind down Black History Month, let’s not wind down Black History. Black History Month is a ruse to observe or teach in one month what the schools should be teaching all year. Be careful of what you read and how you interpret what you read. Most of what appears in…

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Letter to the editor in response to Chronicle article

I’m writing in response to the Charleston Chronicle’s January 17th article, “Santee Cooper Sale Should Be a 2020 Legislative Priority, Says Gullah Geechee Chamber.” Thank you for covering this issue, which is very important to me. I’m glad that the South Carolina House of Representatives passed a resolution for 100 percent clean energy by 2050.…

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Citizens Want Excellence at IAAM

In a recent letter to the editor printed in the Post and Courier, Carol Ezell-Gilson asked why a project of the International African American Museum’s magnitude has gone unquestioned. The city is spending millions on a project to illuminate African American history with limited involvement of the African American community itself. The president and Chief…

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Lest We Forget

65 years ago, we were ordered by the Supreme Court in Brown vs. Board of Education to desegregate our public schools. The term used, that I cannot connect with, was something like, “with all deliberate speed.” The initial response of a segment of the white community was closing the public schools; creating white, private academies; and numerous…

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Final USDA Rule Threatens to Take Food Away from Nearly 700,000 People — Increasing Hunger in South Carolina

Recently, the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) released a final rule that will cut Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) benefits for 680,000 people. SNAP helps thousands of South Carolinians put food on the table. While everyone experiencing a rough patch should be able to use SNAP, the program already places strict time limits on…

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Hair Love, an 2020 Oscar®-winning animated short film from Matthew A. Cherry, tells the heartfelt story of an African American father learning to do his daughter’s hair for the first time

Origin of Porgy & Bess

 

This story is also told in Fordham’s book “True Stories of Black South Carolina”