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Flags Fly For An Ex-President Of Nigeria ‘Too Nice’ For The Job

Former President Alhaji Shehu Usman Shagari, a devout Muslim, a former school teacher, son of a farmer, trader and herder, is being remembered as a nice man, a gentle man but not a particularly strong man. Nice, gentle and amiable – good qualities – but just short of what the opposition desired for the leader of Africa’s…

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Swahili Speakers Stunned As Disney Claims Trademark For ‘Hakuna Matata’

The once common phrase “Hakuna Matata” (No Problem!) is now off limits for African speakers of Swahili. Any commercial use of the two word expression is reserved for its new owner – the American company that produced The Lion King. That’s right – Walt Disney! The California-based company is preparing to release its remake of…

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Emeralds, Rubies Score Big Profits For Foreign Firms As African Countries Go Broke

Foreign mining companies extract more than a quarter of the world’s production of rare emeralds in Zambia yet declare losses to make themselves tax exempt. So far, charges of tax evasion filed against Kagem mine, a subsidiary of the London-listed gemstone miner Gemfields, have been unsuccessful – dismissed by the Zambian Revenue Authority. Gemfields owns…

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Sudan Leader Faces Calls For His Removal As Price Of Bread, Fuel Skyrocket

In the face of a growing movement of Sudanese opposition, protesting rising costs of bread and other essentials, security forces of the government of President Omar al-Bashir moved forcefully to end the demonstrations using tear gas, night sticks and live ammunition, according to witnesses. States of emergency and curfews have been declared in several of…

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Africa’s Blue Economy – The New Frontier?

Six counties in Kenya’s coastal region have been tagged for technical training in the blue economy – what some have called “the new frontier of the African Renaissance.” The goal is to enable young people to find jobs in the maritime industry. Kevit Desai, a Kenyan vocational training principal, says institutions of higher learning must…

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Somalia – A Military Intervention With No Purpose

Iraq, Afghanistan, Libya, Somalia, Syria, Yemen – Enough already! Unfortunately, not yet. Former Lieutenant Daniel L. Davis put it bluntly: “The purpose of the U.S. military has now become, unequivocally, to engage in permanent combat operations in dozens of countries around the world—none of which enhance America’s national security.” And yet here we are in…

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From Mauritania to Qatar: Slavery an Old Evil Takes Many Forms

By Andre Johnson, Urban News Service Incredibly in the 21st century some Africans are still working in conditions akin to slavery informally or formally in some areas of the Middle East. In Mauritania slavery, though officially illegal, remains a fact of life for an estimated 40,000 enslaved people. Like slavery in the antebellum South there is a…

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Studying in South Africa and Learning Who I Am

By Darielis Cruz, Mercy College, Dobbs Ferry, N.Y. I was born in Moca, a small city in the Dominican Republic, and today I am a 21-year-old junior at Mercy College, in New Jersey. Thanks to the Frederick Douglass Global Fellowship, I studied In South Africa last summer, and it was a transformational experience for me.…

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Voting Machines Destroyed In Fire As Congo Elections Near

“The voting machine is not a big problem,” said a confident Salomon Bagheni, a resident of the town of Beni in the Democratic Republic of Congo. “The essential thing is holding the elections on Dec. 23 to bring new leadership to this country.” By “new leadership,” Bagheni meant a new head of state after 18…

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Honoring Kwanzaa: It is time to unite and prosper!

Special from Africa House Global Kwanzaa, by definition, is a celebration held in the United States and in other nations of the Africa Diaspora in the Americas and lasts a week. The celebration honors African heritage in the African/Caribbean-American culture, and is observed from December 26 to January 1, culminating in a feast and gift-giving.…

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CFPB proposes helping debt collectors instead of consumers: Unlimited text messages, email, and 7 phone calls per week per collector

By Charlene Crowell When it comes to personal finance, multiple issues confront consumers every day. From ever-deepening student debt, to denials on mortgage applications, and small-dollar borrowing known as payday loans that come with legal triple-digit interest rates in 33 states — all contribute to a series of financial challenges. But there is also another form…

Right-wing Disrupters

By Bill Fletcher, Jr., NNPA Newswire Contributor Recently, I saw two separate stories about right-wing disrupters. In one case, a well-known bookstore in the Washington, DC area, “Politics & Prose,” was visited by right-wing disrupters during a book event focused on “whiteness.” In another case, a discussion of race and politics in the Dominican Republic…

Judge Damon Keith: The Nation Mourns a Peerless Champion of Justice

By Marc H. Morial (TriceEdneyWire.com) – “By denying the most vulnerable the right to vote, the Majority shuts minorities out of our political process. Rather than honor the men and women whose murdered lives opened the doors of our democracy and secured our right to vote, the Majority has abandoned this court’s standard of review…

Experts: ‘Jury of your Peers’ Rarely Applies to African Americans

By Stacy M. Brown, NNPA Newswire Correspondent @StacyBrownMedia If accused of a crime, American justice supposedly guarantees the right to a trial in front of a “jury of your peers.” However noble the idea might be in theory, many legal experts acknowledge that, due to systemic racism, having a jury of your peers is often just…

Don’t Skip the Work

By Morgan A. Owens, NNPA Newswire Contributor My father always told me I needed to, “pay my dues” in life and I never truly understood what that meant and why I needed to. My life was planned: you go to school, you go to college, you graduate, and you get a good job. I learned…

Guidance From Wise, Courageous Ancestral Warriors

By A. Peter Bailey (TriceEdneyWire.com) – It was in 1619, 400 years ago, that the first African captives were brought to what is now Virginia, North America. Since that time, many of our courageous ancestral warriors, men and women, have fought against the physical and psychological terrorism inflicted by the proponents of white supremacy/racism. If…

Black History Is Our Current History

By Barney Blakeney I recently had the distinct honor of participating in a panel discussion on racial disparities in Charleston County as part of a Black History Month program put on by the Town of Mount Pleasant Historical Commission at Friendship AME Church in Mount Pleasant. But the distinction was bittersweet. Being asked to participate…

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Afrikan Black “Our-Story” Facts

By Hakim Abdul-Ali Greetings of peace to you on this amazing day, and we know by now that it’s that time of the year again when the annual Black History Month begins in the United States of America. No doubt about it, it’s a continuing celebration of and about Black struggles, triumphs, achievements, endurances and,…

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Are We Coming Or Going?

By Beverly Gadson-Birch I recall writing an article about a decade ago entitled “Are We Coming Or Going?” and it got me thinking about the state of education in Charleston County. The more meetings I attend the more things remain the same. I find myself questioning whether we are coming or going because after 50…

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What’s All The Screaming About At Meeting Street Academy

By Barney Blakeney A few years ago I lived near the first location of the Meeting Street Academy School on King Street. The school was across the street from my house. Each weekday morning I was awakened by the sound of children playing before classes began. It was a joyful sound. Them lil sapsuckers would…

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“What’s Going On” Realities

By Hakim Abdul-Ali The tumultuous living experience of today’s modernity is a continual episode in maturation and developing. I refer to living in that way because we’re always evolving in one sense or the other in our relationships with each other and nature be they with family, friends, strangers, who we may have just met,…

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It’s Not About Color; It’s About Survival

By Beverly Gadson-Birch Burrr! It’s cold outside. The Weather Channel issued a plant and pet warning with temperatures in the low teens. I decided I had too much invested in my porch plants to let the cold destroy them. I threw on a coat and grabbed a couple of covers to keep them warm. I…

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Complacency

If tomorrow comes and all of the fake news is true, what will we the people do? If our allies become our adversaries, if we have fighting in our streets, like in Afghanistan, never knowing if our city /municipality is next. If our election process is so disrupted, that we are no longer a democracy/republic.…

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Wake Up, America!

No more Papa John’s Pizza for me. Too busy fighting racism, classism and sexism. Too busy declaring and decreeing to the Trump administration don’t deport DACA and TPS immigrants in America. Too busy fighting the murders of young Black men shot in the back by corrupt cops. As for me and my house we will…

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America Could Be Great, Or Not

Kindness and empathy are thought of as abstract things (that one can’t see) and act as a person’s own reflection of the choices free will mandates. However, kindness and empathy, I argue, are concrete things that one can see, or not. One may choose to see the humanity in an NFL player who protests the…

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What Black America Cannot Fail to Forget

By Dr. William Small, Jr. There is no question mark at the conclusion of the title to this essay. Although the title will hopefully raise a question, it is instead intended to remind Black people in America and throughout the Diaspora of the importance of a statement that I often heard recited while growing up:…

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Carolina Stories: "Charlie’s Place" tells the story of an African American nightclub in Myrtle Beach that was a significant stop on the Chitlin’ Circuit in the segregated South