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Oil Barons Bid Billions For Mozambican Oil While Storm Fatalities Spike

The back-to-back cyclones that have ravaged Mozambique are unprecedented in recorded history, the UN said Friday. As more villages are wiped away, a multi-billion dollar bidding war is heating up in foreign board rooms among multinationals eager to extract Mozambican oil. Top bid so far by Occidental Petroleum Corp has reached $57 billion. The fantastic…

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After Risking Life, Liberian Activist Scoops ‘Green Nobel Prize’

Multinational corporations who seek weak democracies, high rates of poverty, and untapped resources, seem to make a beeline for Liberia which has struggled to overcome two wars and the devastating pandemic of ebola. As a result, “Liberia has been taken over by multinational corporations exploiting its resources at the expense of Liberians, especially the country’s…

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Woni Spotts, The First Black Woman to Travel to Every Country and Continent in the World

Woni Spotts reached the goal of visiting every country and continent in the world. Woni’s travels began as a child when she accompanied her parents on tours. Later, Woni hosted a travel documentary with the goal of visiting every country. During the mid-2000s, Woni toured Monaco, France, and Southern Europe. Between 2014 and 2018, Woni visited Germany, Netherlands,…

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Former Pres. Nkrumah Recalled On Day Of His Passing

The anniversary of the passing of Ghana’s first Prime Minister and President, Dr. Kwame Nkrumah, prompted reflections by Ghanaians on social media of his legacy and contributions. Dr. Nkrumah’s daughter Samia, in an open letter, wrote: “Kwame Nkrumah may not be with us physically but he lives in our hearts and minds as the fire…

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Kenya Launches Early Bid For Prized Seat On The U.N.’s Security Council

With a seat on the powerful Security Council at the United Nations, Kenya could help bring focus to climate change, sustainable development and the region’s security. “This government has been trying to do things that are exemplary to the world. Taking this leadership in the world is a very rare thing in the developing world,”…

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African Queen to Address PAFEN in South Carolina

Her Majesty Queen Mother Dowoti Desir Hounon Houna II (Queen of the Palace of Dada Daagbo Hounon Houna II Guely and Supreme Spiritual Chief of Vodun Hwendo) of Benin, West Africa will be the keynote speaker for the 5th Annual Meeting of the Pan African Family Empowerment and Land Preservation Network (PAFEN) on Saturday, May…

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Zambian Villagers Win Landmark Ruling in Water Poisoning Case

Zambian villagers whose livelihoods were turned upside down by a toxic spill from a copper mine will finally have their day in court. The villagers succeeded against the odds in a case pitting their claims against a worldwide mining company which denied responsibility for the spill caused by a local Zambian company it controlled. It…

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On Earth Day, Africa Braces For Severe Drought 

Water has no enemy. That’s the theme of a popular song by famed Nigerian singer and activist Fela Anikulapo Kuti who reminds us just how vital water is. If you’re going to wash, he sings, it’s water you’re going to use. If you want to cook soup, cool off in hot weather, give to your…

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Libya Faces New Round Of Fighting With Foreign Backers 

“Why is Libya so lawless”? That was the question on the lips of some of the reporters covering the dangerous new level of confrontation facing Libyans by internal and external forces including foreign countries in Europe and the Middle East. The capital, Tripoli, is now the scene of serious fighting between rival forces as negotiations…

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Ebola Outbreak Not A Global Emergency, Says World Health Group

The World Health Organization has declined to declare the Ebola outbreak in Democratic Republic of Congo a global health emergency because the disease is currently limited to two provinces, reports Science. On the same day, WHO reported the efficacy of an Ebola vaccine that is going through a preliminary trial to be 97.5 percent at…

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How Russia Exploits White Supremacy in U.S.

By A. Peter Bailey (TriceEdneyWire.com) – It is almost amusing to see, hear and read how the U.S. press, politicians and academicians weep and wail, moan and groan and huff and puff about Russia’s attempt to take propagandistic advantage of the White supremacy that has been a pivotal force in this country’s life for the…

NFL’s Depression-era Ban on Black Players Lingers On in the Owner’s Box

By Jesse Jackson, Sr. (TriceEdneyWire.com) – The National Football League season opened last week with a full slate of games. On the field, extraordinary athletes of all races and backgrounds competed with the same set of rules. Yet, it is worth noting that this has not always been the case — and that the legacy…

Trump and the weather

By Bill Fletcher, Jr., NNPA Newswire Contributor Each week I swear that I will write something other than about Donald Trump. I cannot keep to that promise consistently, particularly when certain events unfold. This week is a prime example. The Washington Post published a story on September 8th that the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration backed Trump over…

Flying While Black: Stop the U.S. Congress from Raising Air Travel Taxes

By Dr. Benjamin F. Chavis Jr., President and CEO National Newspaper Publishers Association Working families in the African American community and beyond have a hard-enough time keeping up with daily expenses. Every mortgage payment, car payment, trip to the grocery store, stop at the gas station, or utility bill that shows up in the mail…

DeVos Hands For-Profit Colleges $11.1 Billion Over 10 Years

By Charlene Crowell  Most consumers would likely agree that consumers should get what they pay for. If a product or service fails to deliver its promises, refunds are in order.   That kind of thinking guided the Obama Administration’s decision to address false promises made to student loan borrowers.   A rule known as the “borrower defense to repayment”, came on the heels of successive for-profit college closures that left thousands of students stranded…

Disarm Hate

By Marian Wright Edelman On August 2 I wrote about the relentless scourge of gun violence and the two children killed in Gilroy, California and asked: Why does gun violence remain a uniquely horrible American epidemic and why does it go on and on and on and on? Two days later a new shooting made…

Four Years After Emanuel

By Barney Blakeney This week the Charleston community observed the fourth anniversary of the June 17 massacre at Emanuel AME Church in which nine people were slaughtered. I find it hard to write about the Emanuel slaughter – it’s a sensitive issue that evokes a lot of different emotions and people most often think with their…

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Back to Common Zen Sense

By Hakim Abdul-Ali Wisdom is something that many folk in “hue-manity” speak of in sacred, hollow, lost or forgotten realms of appreciation. I try not to play with this prized realty because I sincerely believe that to be wise is something we mustn’t to be at leisure with in acquiring same. I’ve been an eternal…

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Dark Money Elections Detected

By Beverly Gadson-Birch It’s election year and everyone seems to be jumping on the bandwagon. The problem is everyone jumping on board is not singing the same tune. In order to make melodious music, everyone must be in harmony. Two very important local races to watch are the mayor of Charleston and North Charleston. I know y’all…

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Two Tales Of Summer

By Barney Blakeney Being a newspaper reporter in your home town comes with some really nice perks. And being a reporter for the community’s only Black newspaper offers even more perks! Knowing the community and the people who live here has advantages that make the job indescribably enjoyable and rewarding. A trip to the grocery…

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What is the Quandary Called Jazz?

By Hakim Abdul-Ali Music is a part of the everyday makeup and mindsets of many diverse cultures of the world. It’s been that way, seemingly forever, for as long as most inquisitive intellectuals can remember. And still, many interestingly different formats of this phenomena exists throughout the motley panoramas of “hue-man” cultural expressions. Some may…

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Raising Kids and the 2020 Presidential Elections

By Barney Blakeney I watched Whoopi Goldberg on the morning talk show ‘The View’ the other day which featured Democratic presidential hopeful Elizabeth Warren. My mornings used to be Tom Joyner’s radio program from 6 a.m.-10 a.m. featuring news commentator Shaun King, local sister Tessa Spencer Adams on WCIV from 10 a.m.-11 a.m., The View…

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The Misogynistic and Racist Lindsay Graham

Dear Gentlepeople Of South Carolina, I am writing because I just cannot take this racist and misogynistic political rhetoric from Lindsay Graham and the Republican Party anymore without speaking up. I am appalled that one of our own senators from our lovely state of South Carolina has decided to take a starring role in the…

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American Democracy: A View from the Mirror

By Dr. William Small, Jr. In the world of politics, both international and domestic, perhaps there is nothing more important for governments than the maintenance of the ability to self-define. This statement is very much connected to the strategy for constructing public arguments or debating, which says that once the major premise is accepted, the…

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Lesser-known broadband policy leaves rural areas out

By Johnathan Hladik, policy director, [email protected], Center for Rural Affairs Connectivity is the defining aspect of our 21st century economy. Access to broadband internet offers the best in education, health care, and economic development. Unfortunately for many, the best isn’t available. More than 24 million Americans lack broadband access. This includes 31 percent of households…

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CCSD Commits to New Teacher Recruitment and Retention Strategies

By Bill Briggman, Chief Human Resource Officer, Charleston County School District For years there have been conversations about teacher compensation and questions as to whether the salary structure for teachers is competitive. While these conversations and the debate over the funding of school districts have been taking place, our teacher force has been significantly decreasing.…

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Hair Love, an 2020 Oscar®-winning animated short film from Matthew A. Cherry, tells the heartfelt story of an African American father learning to do his daughter’s hair for the first time