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A Nation Remembers the Steve Biko Legacy

(TriceEdneyWire.com/GIN) – South Africans marked the 40th year since the death of anti-apartheid activist Steve Biko with a wreath-laying ceremony at the Kgosi Mampuru Correctional Centre. An African nationalist and African socialist, Biko was at the forefront of a grassroots campaign known as the Black Consciousness Movement during the late 1960s and 1970s. His ideas…

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U.S.-Based Kenyan Scholars Spar Over Election Outcome

(TriceEdneyWire.com/GIN) – The fierce contest between President Uhuru Kenyatta and opposition candidate Raila Odinga since their discarded election in August found echo here in Atlanta between Nairobi’s ambassador to Washington and a prominent U.S.-based legal scholar. “I can categorically say here looking you straight in the eye that the Supreme Court robbed Uhuru Kenyatta of…

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Corruption Returns With a Vengence in Ghana

Waving a gold sword – a symbol of Ghana’s presidency – the new president came out swinging against years of debilitating corruption. “We must restore integrity in public life,” President Nana Akufo-Addo thundered at his swearing in ceremony last January. “State coffers are not spoils for the party that wins an election, but resources for…

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Black Immigrant Organization Angry about Trump Rescinding DACA

By Frederick H. Lowe (TriceEdneyWire.com) -The Black Alliance for Just Immigration, the nation’s largest black-led organization championing racial justice and immigrant rights, blasted the Trump Administration for rescinding Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) that allowed 800,000 immigrant youth to live in the United States without fear of deportation. “BAJI is appalled by Trump’s decision…

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Will Africa’s Richest Man ‘Make America Great Again’?

(TriceEdneyWire.com/GIN) – Alhaji Aliko Dangote, the 60-year-old Nigerian cement tycoon, has his eye on new investment prospects and is tempted by U.S. opportunities in renewable energy and petrochemicals. “Let’s say that by 2025, I’m looking at (investing) between $20 billion and $50 billion outside Africa. Mind you, we don’t do small things,” said Dangote, who…

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After 190 Years, the Global Impact of the Black Press Is Still Undeniable

By Stacy M. Brown, NNPA Newswire Contributor For 190 years, the global impact of the Black Press has been irrefutable; from fighting against colonialism to Africa to advocating for Black soldiers fighting in Europe during the world wars and shining a light on Apartheid in South Africa the Black-owned newspapers have always been a voice…

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Missing Burundi Teens Highlight Media Blind Spot towards the Black Community

By Barrington Salmon, NNPA Newswire Contributor The mainstream media response to the disappearance of a group of teenagers from Burundi, who were in Washington, D.C. for a robotics competition, has once again revealed why covering the stories of missing Black people remains so complex. The team was in Washington for the FIRST Global Challenge robotics…

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When You Educate a Girl, You Educate a Nation

By Congresswoman Frederica S. Wilson (D-Fla.) As I write this, I am preparing to travel with my colleagues to Nigeria, where I will have the honor of meeting some of the Chibok girls who were released after two waves of negotiations between Boko Haram and Nigerian government officials. It is my fourth trip to Nigeria…

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Hundreds Feared Dead in Sierra Leone Mudslide Linked to Climate Change

(TriceEdneyWire.com/GIN) – A fast-moving wall of mud, loosened by heavy overnight rains, has buried over 300 Sierra Leoneans, many of them sleeping children, during a torrential downpour early Monday. The deluge was foreseen by climate change experts. Videos posted by local residents show an angry flood of dark orange mud rushing down a steep street…

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Global Meeting of the Women’s Forum for the Economy & Society: Daring to lead in a disrupted world

From Black PR Newswire Different and often opposing forces are at play in a disrupted world. Automation technology is putting jobs at risk, yet many companies are developing new ways to put humanity at the center of their organizations. The US Federal Government seems to be moving away from collaboration on climate, yet other leaders…

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One Year of Trump: What We’ve Lost and What We’ve Learned

By Rep. Karen Bass (D-Calif.) The year leading up to his inauguration in 2017, as the Republican presidential nominee, Donald Trump espoused senseless, baseless and ultimately empty assertions about the state of Black Americans and our communities. “What the hell do you have to lose?” he screamed in front of a predominantly White crowd in…

Blacks and Politics: Either Get Engaged or Get Left Behind

By Jeffrey Boney, NNPA Member/Houston Forward Times Okay, everyone, if you are reading this, welcome to 2018. You made it, and with that being said, I feel that this is the perfect opportunity for us to be honest about an important truth. First of all, as I see it, it is extremely clear to me,…

When Someone Tells You Who They Are, Believe Them!

By Dr. Wilmer J. Leon, III (TriceEdneyWire.com) – “Why are we having all these people from sh*thole countries come here?” Trump said, according to these people, referring to African countries and Haiti. He then suggested that the United States should instead bring more people from countries like Norway, whose prime minister he met Wednesday.” -Washington…

Skin Color, Not Credit Risk, Tied to Auto Finance, Says Report

By Charlene Crowell Nationwide, auto loans represent the third highest category of consumer debt. And according to new research, the color of your skin has a lot to do with how much debt is incurred. Discrimination in Auto Lending, authored and published by the National Fair Housing Alliance (NFHA), found that despite federal laws banning…

No Surprise, No Doubt!

By Dr. E. Faye Williams, Esq. (TriceEdneyWire.com) — I’ve never witnessed it. It’s only been reported to me by those present to experience it. It’s an open secret that is made no better with a direct acknowledgment of its existence! I speak of the denigration of people of color by a racist who, in the…

Dr. King and the Dignity of Work

By Julianne Malveaux Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. didn’t plan to get involved in the Memphis garbage worker’s strike. He hadn’t planned to be there on the fateful day when he was shot on April 4, 1968. But he was pressured to go the first time and found the garbage worker’s strike compelling. He promised…

Homeless To Hope Concert Was A Party With A Purpose

By Barney Blakeney   I got the chance to attend the March 11 inaugural Homeless to Hope Fund Benefit concert. Didn’t go to church, but went to the concert. And wouldn’t you know it, my preacher saw me there! I got busted, but it was worth it. The concert was off the chain. I don’t…

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Family or Domestic Violence: The Monster Within

By Beverly Gadson-Birch   In wake of the recent murders of three generations of the Manigault family, I thought I would focus today on family and domestic violence.  It is unfathomable that such a heinous crime could occur to such a wonderful family and on the doorsteps of an old but highly respected community. The…

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Springtime is for Lovers

By Hakim Abdul-Ali   I was just thinking about the various seasons of the year and how they affect me and others in “hue-manity.” For all the conscious lovers of being in the here and now, and who give complete credit for their existence to the Most High Alone, it’s a wonderful time of the year.…

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We All Have Responsibilities In Gun Control

By Barney Blakeney   The Valentine’s Day massacre at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Florida has reinvigorated the conversation about gun violence on a national scale. Students are raising their voices in the discussion. Rightfully so, they must live in the aftermath of the violent society we’ve created. Seventeen students and teachers were killed…

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Black Men: “Bad Boys Need Their Fathers”

By Beverly Gadson-Birch There is no shortage of news.  Stories can be found everywhere!  As a writer I never know what I will write until I sit down to the computer.  There are several gut-wrenching stories in the news this week worthy of exposure; but today, I am led to deal with the rise and…

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Black Folks’ Continual Struggles

By Hakim Abdul-Ali This past Black History Month has been a hectic month for me personally, but I still managed to squeeze in time to read, actually re-read, Vincent Harding’s masterpiece about the Black struggle for freedom in America called, “There Is A River.” Without taking up your time today in discussing the book overall, I’ll…

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What the CBO Score Means for South Carolina

“There is a mean spirit rampant in our country that would have us punish our most vulnerable citizens for simply being poor, old, sick, or holding down well-paying jobs,” said Steve Skardon, Jr., executive director of Palmetto Project. “It suggests that if these people are starved long enough or allowed to be a bit sicker,…

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Does the DeVos Education Budget Promote “Choice” or Segregation?

By Kimberly Hall and Michael Hilton The American public education system should provide an equal opportunity for all students to receive a quality rigorous education – regardless of class, race or ethnicity. In direct opposition to this goal, the Fiscal Year 2018 education budget recommendations from the Trump Administration show an effort to limit opportunities,…

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Homage to Sarah Buncum Simmons: Mother’s Day 2017

By Ade Ofunniyin, PhD It has been nearly five years since I began my work with Gullah Society and African Burial Grounds. My interest was spurred by a visit to the gravesite of my ancestor William Simmons Senior. The late Mr. Simmons is the grandfather of my grandfather Philip Simmons. William Simmons Sr., his son…

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Does History Make a Difference?

By Dr. William Small, Jr. The American political landscape currently seems to be in a state of disarray. The confusion that now seems to abound serves to create the impression, in the minds of some, that the nation is experiencing some transition in its national values. It is true that we have a President who…

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In this episode of “Meet The Black Press,” NNPA Podcast Host Akil Wilson talks to James Washington, the publisher of The Dallas Weekly, about the business of running a Black newspaper and the future of the Black Press