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Congo Sends Asylum Seekers Back To United States

Six Congolese nationals and two Zambian citizens were sent back to the U.S. after Congolese officials called their deportations “inhumane.” The six arrived last week aboard an American aircraft at Ndjili Airport, “handcuffed, chained to the ankles and hips as slaves” according to Congolese Human Rights Minister Marie Ange Mushobekwa. Further, the expelled persons were…

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Gifted Filmmaker Passes in Burkina Faso

Just days before a major retrospective of his cinematic work in Brazil, Idrissa Ouedraogo passed away in his home country of Burkina Faso. He was 64. “We talked two weeks ago,” said a grieving Janaina Oliveira of Brazil’s Center for Afro-Brazilian and Indigenous Studies in a Facebook post. “I was bringing him to Brazil. Tickets,…

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Obiang Revives Death Penalty In Bid To Save Unpopular Regime

Equatorial Guinea, under President Teodoro Obiang Nguema Mbasogo, is reviving the odious death penalty against 147 opposition activists accused of “rebellion, attacks on authority and public disorder” – a sign of deepening desperation under President Obiang. The activists include leaders of Citizens for Innovation (CI), many of whom were rounded up after a purported coup…

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Nigerian Parents Plead With Officials to Speed Up Rescue of Abducted Girls

(TriceEdneyWire.com/GIN) – Parents of young teenage girls are pleading with Nigerian officials to speed up rescue efforts for their children kidnapped by Boko Haram. “We don’t want these girls to stay long with those militants. Anything can happen to them,” said Kachalla Bukar, father of a 14 year old girl, one of 110 abducted by…

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UK Aid Group Knew of Sex Orgies By Staffers in Poor Countries – Report

Revelations that the renowned emergency aid group, Oxfam International, failed to catch rogue aid workers who admitted to hiring prostitutes for wild sex parties in Haiti and Chad, have shaken the aid community worldwide. According to a blistering new report in the Times of London, Oxfam knew of concerns about the conduct of two of…

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Ethiopian Resignation Met With Worry, Anger and State of Emergency

(TriceEdneyWire.com/GIN) – The Ethiopian government has given itself sweeping new powers – from restrictions on freedom of assembly and free expression to the deployment of combat-ready troops in civilian centers. The newly-imposed state of emergency is expected to last six months. The harsh new limits on democratic expression may have blindsided those in the international…

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Mall Developers Stake Out Turf Around Picturesque Victory Falls

(TriceEdneyWire.com/GIN) – A trip to one of Africa’s world class wonders doesn’t mean one needs to be deprived of the pleasures of shopping. At least that was the thinking of developers who obtained permits for a $13 million multi-purpose shopping mall not far from Zimbabwe’s renowned Victoria Falls. A groundbreaking ceremony took place last week…

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Cape Town in Survival Mode as Water Supplies are Near Zero

(TriceEdneyWire.com/GIN) – Only days remain in Cape Town, South Africa, before a jewel of natural beauty and one of the wealthiest destinations in Africa becomes the first major city in the world to run out of water. Rationing has already begun with some 200 collection points around the city. Security guards stand watch as anxious…

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African Immigrants in Israel Face Forced Deportation

(TriceEdneyWire.com/GIN) – Under a so-called “infiltrator’s law”, more than 1,000 African asylum seekers in Israel face deportation from Israeli detention centers starting in March. Speaking at a recent Cabinet meeting, Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu defended the harsh enforcement policy. “We are not acting against refugees,” he said. “We are acting against illegal migrants who come…

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Senegal Yet to Fulfill Pledge of Free Education to Girls

(TriceEdneyWire.com/GIN) – In a politely worded letter from Human Rights Watch, Senegalese President Macky Sall was highly commended for addressing abuses against street children including those exploited in the course of their education in the Koran. “We have conducted human rights research on children in Senegal since 2005,” the New York-based group wrote. “Our most…

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Let’s Move Forward Together

By Marian Wright Edelman In the spring of 1960, I was a senior at Spelman College in Atlanta and decided to help organize the civil rights student sit-in movement to desegregate lunch counters. I went to Atlanta’s City Hall to engage in our cause to end racial apartheid. I felt overwhelming gratitude for the chance…

Here’s One Way We Could Keep More Black Male Educators in the Classroom

By Francis Pina Does being me give me an advantage in my inner-city classroom? I often reflect on this question because every school year I learn from a handful of students that I am their very first Black male teacher. If we got 100 teachers in a room, statistically I would be one of just…

March For Our Lives Follows a Venerable American Tradition of Student Social Activism

By Marc H. Morial “By our readiness to allow arms to be purchased at will and fired at whim, by allowing our movie and television screens to teach our children that the hero is one who masters the art of shooting and the technique of killing, by allowing all these developments, we have created an…

Students of Color Need to See More People of Color – That Shouldn’t Be Controversial

By Nate Bowling I spent most of my first year of grad school sitting in the back row of class with my hood up. There were nearly 40 of us in the cohort. Two were Black. My hoodie was an act of silent dissent. Today, I completely understand when my students want to do the same,…

Natalie Cofield: The Living Walker Legacy

By Julianne Malveaux (TriceEdneyWire.com) Nine years ago, when she was just 26, Natalie Cofield was looking for a mentor.  A young woman with entrepreneurship hard-wired into her spirit, she was discouraged that many did not take her seriously and disheartened that she could not make the connections she needed to further her entrepreneurial mission.  So…

‘Scared Negro Disease’ Remains

By Gary L. Flowers (TriceEdneyWire.com) – As another Black History Month has passed, I revisited the relevant speech given by former Atlanta Mayor Maynard Jackson in 2002 while speaking in Portland, Ore., titled, “The Scared Negro Disease.” Mayor Jackson’s diagnosis is seemingly cancerous in Black politicians in the Commonwealth of Virginia and in some other…

Mothers, Fight For Your Sons

By Beverly Gadson-Birch    As we approach Mother’s Day, I am reminded of what some mothers go through for their children. Last Saturday, Timothy Taylor’s mom, Joanne, organized another march to free her son. Saturday’s march was the second by Timothy’s supporters to draw attention to his unjust imprisonment.  If you have not been keeping up…

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A Forthright Look at Brotherhood

By Hakim Abdul-Ali I’d like to address a subject that’s close to my heart and spirits. It’s about the subject of Afro-American unified brotherhood and its  importance for all of us in this nation’s Black communities. I’ve been moved to address this topic because I recently had a conversation with an intellectual acquaintance of mine, an…

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National Example of Double Standards

By Beverly Gadson-Birch   I get tired of folks talking about Black folk playing the race card.  This is what you hear when folks don’t want to own up to the truth. The naysayers will do almost anything to make you believe reality is fiction.  And, the reality is there are two sets of rules…

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CAJM Addresses Affordable Housing At Nehemiah Action Assembly

By Barney Blakeney The Charleston Area Justice Ministry Monday night held its 2018 Nehemiah Action Assembly focusing on the ministry’s 2018 agenda of addressing affordable housing and gentrification. Last November members voted to address that agenda in 2018. About 2,000 people attended the sixth Nehemiah Action Assembly Monday night. CAJM’s had some success in the…

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Racism and Evolving Afro Ideologies

By Hakim Abdul-Ali    America is besieged with continuing plagues within its democratic landscape, and it doesn’t seem to be getting any better. Sadly, that’s the way that it is as this nation struggles with the escalating pneumonic illnesses of racism and discrimination. I was thinking about how we Black folk have, “our-storically” speaking, managed…

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It Ain’t Racism, It’s Economics

By Barney Blakeney   I like to get feedback from the stuff I write. Good, bad or indifferent – it lets me know somebody read the stuff. But as I tell young writers, you can’t take feedback too seriously. Especially the positive stuff! The positive stuff helps you to gauge whether you’re on the right…

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The South Carolina State Legislature Must Stop Smacking the Tar Baby

By Dr. William Small, Jr., former Board Chairman at SCSU and retired educator   Recently I was contacted by Charleston Chronicle staff reporter Barney Blakeney to comment on an article he prepared. The timely, thoughtful and well-written piece entitled “South Carolina State University Needs A Few Good Recruits,” raised the issue of why individuals are…

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Garrett Academy of Technology and the Center for Advanced Studies: Moving Forward

By Jesse Williams, Co-chair, Quality Education Project (QEP) Political Action Committee; Co-Chair, the North Charleston Civil Coalition for Reform The Charleston County School District (CCSD), with the school board’s approval, plans to build a new Center for Advanced Studies (CAS) in North Charleston. This proposal for the new CAS will add several trades to the…

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Moving Beyond the Buddy System

By John Singletary, 2019 City of North Charleston mayoral candidate The recent article titled THE BUDDY SYSTEM in the Aug 27, 2017 edition of The Post and Courier outlines Keith Summey’s “ good old boy,” self-serving, greedy, egotistical twenty year reign as mayor for the City of North Charleston. Surprisingly, I learned of the article…

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An Open Letter to Mayor Tecklenburg, White Supremacists and Their Supporters

We, the Charleston Democratic Socialists of America, and organizers of the demonstration against white supremacy in Marion Square on August 16, 2017, do not support Mayor Tecklenburg’s plans to leave local Confederate monuments standing while the city finds ways to “tell the whole story” through new plaques and language. Can Charleston sufficiently contextualize these public…

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In this episode of “Meet The Black Press,” NNPA Podcast Host Akil Wilson talks to James Washington, the publisher of The Dallas Weekly, about the business of running a Black newspaper and the future of the Black Press