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Ethiopian Leader Sparks Euphoria Among Diaspora in a 6 Day U.S. Trip

It’s been called “Abiy-mania” – an impulse to reach out and hug the young new Prime Minister of Ethiopia, Abiy Ahmed, who called an end to his country’s bitter war with Eritrea among other sweeping changes in the Horn of Africa. Last month, the 41 year old Ethiopian leader landed in the United States where…

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Liberian Lawyer Seeks Repatriation for Consul General and Diplomat Dr. Malachi Z. York from US Prison

The director for litigation (court matters) at Garlawulo and Associates Law Firm, Cllr. Wellington G. Bedell said Dr. Malachi Z. York should be released and repatriated based on the fact of his status as a Naturalized citizen, Consul General and Diplomatic Agent for the Republic of Liberia, and the fact that his health is swiftly…

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Hundreds of Polling Stations in Mali Shut Due to Violence

As Malians went to the polls on Sunday, over 700 polling stations were shuttered amid threats of violence and attacks including election officials beaten up, ballot boxes burned and election supervisors stopped by armed groups from entering polling stations. The affected polling stations are located in the country’s central and northern regions, areas troubled by…

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We’re Not a Dumping Ground for Used Cars, Says Rwanda Prez at New Auto Plant Opening

You’ll see plenty of Volvos, Mercedes, Hondas, Toyotas and even a Ford Windstar tootling around the booming cities of Lagos, Nairobi and Johannesburg. But these foreign cars were no spring chickens when they arrived in Africa after years of use. Often they had to be totally rebuilt in order to sell at top dollar. Only…

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Liberian Diplomat in U.S. Prison Denied Healthcare

By David S. Menjor, Liberian Observer Dr. Malachi Z. York, a Liberian Diplomat, is said to be languishing in solitary confinement in a U.S. prison without any medical care accorded him, even though diagnoses show that he is suffering from complicated diseases, including Hereditary Angioedema. In light of this finding and following a clarion call…

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Cameroon’s President, Going on 90 – Time To Step Down?

Cameroon’s President Paul Biya is seriously considering a re-election bid despite having served 36 years in the job and despite approaching 90 years of age. The President-for-Life syndrome is sadly alive and well. An editorial in the Liberian paper Daily Observer expressed its frustration in dramatic fashion. “Why, Africa, why?  Why must your leaders treat…

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Major AIDS Conference Aims To ‘Build Bridges’ Where Epidemic Still Surges

The International Conference on AIDS – the largest conference on any global health issue in the world – opens this week under the title “Breaking Barriers, Building Bridges” With hundreds of scheduled talks and roundtables, AIDS 2018 has defined its goal as promoting human rights-based and evidence-informed HIV responses tailored to the needs of people…

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President Obama Still a Hit in Kenya During a ‘Private Citizen’ Trip

Former President Barack Obama turned up in Kenya this week at the Sauti Kuu Resource Centre – a community center to fight poverty launched by his sister, Dr. Rita Auma Obama. It was a quick detour from a week spent in Tanzania where Mr. Obama and his wife Michelle toured the Serengeti National Park. After…

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Key Witness Recants Child Molestation Testimony Against Dr. York

By David S. Menjor, Liberian Observer Following 16 years of Dr. Malachi Kobina York’s 135 years prison sentence at ADMAX maximum prison facilities in Colorado for acts said to be grave, the Daily Observer has received a documentary report presenting Habiybah Washington recanting her testimony she delivered in 2004 against Dr. York. The official judgment…

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After Stunning World Cup Victory, Migrants Also Rejoice

There’s a festive spirit in France following its second World Cup final in 20 years. For the decisive game, fans had been glued to their sets, including at a Salvation Army shelter where several dozen migrants had watched the match. “You can dream in France,” Youssef, a 25 year old from Darfur, Sudan, told the…

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What the Supreme Court Nomination Would Mean for Black Women

By: La’Tasha D. Mayes, MSPPM, Executive Director, New Voices for Reproductive Justice With the confirmation process underway for Judge Brett Kavanaugh’s nomination to the Supreme Court, Black women have certainly been voicing our opposition. There’s no sugar-coating it: confirming Brett Kavanaugh to the Supreme Court would be disastrous for Black women. To begin, Kavanaugh has made it clear that he doesn’t support the right to abortion enshrined in Roe v.…

Jim Crow 2018

By Jeffrey L. Boney, NNPA Newswire Political Analyst From 1880 to 1965, there was an all-out assault on preventing African Americans from voting by having their right to vote deemed invalid. The Fifteenth Amendment prohibited blatant disenfranchisement on the basis of race or prior enslavement, but many Southern states came up with a slew of…

Convicted On A Lie

By Erick Johnson, Chicago Crusader/NNPA Member Last June, Octavius Morris in Chicago called an attorney in New York and made a shocking confession of a crime that was committed 26 years ago. For the attorneys of Roosevelt Myles, 54, it was the call they had waited for: to speak to a woman who had been…

NFL Owners’ Treatment of Colin Kaepernick Disgraces League and Country

By Jesse Jackson Colin Kaepernick may yet get his day in court. Kaepernick is the talented former NFL quarterback who in 2016 began a protest against police brutality and institutionalized racial discrimination by kneeling during the playing of the national anthem. Other players joined the protests. Kaepernick wasn’t protesting the anthem or the flag. He…

Stop Kavanaugh: President Trump’s Supreme Court Nominee Must Not Join the High Court

By Marc H. Morial, President and CEO of the National Urban League (TriceEdneyWire.com) – “It is confidence in the men and women who administer the judicial system that is the true backbone of the rule of law.” — Supreme Court Justice John Paul Stevens, 531 U.S. 98, Bush v. Gore [Dissent], December 12, 2000 There…

EPA Roll-Backs Will Hurt People of Color

By Felicia M. Davis, Director of the HBCU Green Fund and on the boards of Green 2.0 and The National Coalition on Black Civic Participation President Trump visiting West Virginia to announce a major rollback in regulations limiting coal fired power plant emissions feels like being lost in a dark coal mine, reaching a fork in…

Thinking of Respect on a Summer’s Day

By Hakim Abdul-Ali  This summer season so far has been one where it’s been somewhat hard to describe in mere terms of simplistic expressions. It’s really been something unexpected and thought-provoking in many norms. You see, it’s been raining a lot off and on where I live in the coastal Charleston,  South Carolina, area locally…

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Lynching In America Just Took A Different Form

By Barney Blakeney   Lately I’ve been in that melancholy mood I sometimes get when I’m depressed about the future of Black folks. Over the past few days there were five murders in the same number of days in North Charleston. All but one of the victims was Black. And if it ain’t enough for…

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Death Visits Once Again

By Hakim Abdul-Ali The cloud of death hovers around everything in life. It’s an evident reality that all living things and beings will experience sooner or later. I’ve been writing about this ever-present shadowy phenomenon from time-to-time as a reminder to myself, you and others that each moment in time that we’ve been given is…

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Feeling The Pain Of Unaffordable Housing

By Barney Blakeney I got the phone message from a lady at William Enston Homes in downtown Charleston a couple of weeks ago. She was expressing frustration at the Charleston Housing authority’s announcement that some residents would be moved out of their apartments as they are renovated. She felt the Charleston Housing Authority, which owns…

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Young, Gifted and on Crack

By Beverly Gadson-Birch  It’s been raining cats and dogs for the past two months. I am not a rainy-day person. I feel like I have been held captive in my home for the better part of the summer. It has been difficult planning outdoor activities. Is there anyone other than me who feels cheated out…

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An Anger Seminar at a Traffic Stop

By Hakim Abdul-Ali  It was raining pretty heavily last week where I live. In fact, it was raining so hard on one particular day until the downpour seemingly brought everything to a standstill, especially when it came to being literally stuck in traffic while waiting for an seemingly unresponsive traffic stop light to mechanically work…

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Charleston’s Landscape of Memory: The Gentrification of History

By Robert R. Macdonald The Charleston History Commission’s effort to formulate wording for a plaque intended to place the monument to John C. Calhoun on Marion Square in historical context is comparable to placing a band-aid on a cancerous lesion. The wound here is the landscape of memory presenting a mythical Charleston past almost totally…

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League of Women Voters and the 2018 CCSD School Board Elections

By Melinda Hamilton, League of Women Voters of the Charleston Area President Consider a revolution. It’s time. Start by thinking of 113,000 children, the area’s economy and one of the toughest public service jobs around. What’s the connection? The 113,000 children are students in public schools in Berkeley, Charleston and Dorchester counties. Sooner or later…

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Justice is Not Just a Strong Sentence, but Also Reform

By Marquis Jenkins I wasn’t prepared to hear the news that Michael Slager, the police officer who shot and killed Walter Scott, would have to spend 20 years in prison for depriving him of his civil rights. His sentencing in federal court last month was unusual at best. As we’ve seen time and again, even…

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Why is there a need for an alternative?

By Brother Earl Muhammad, Chairman, Lowcountry Education Many of us have read newspaper articles or assessments from prominent educators or heard via news and social media about the disparities in the distribution of resources in regards to either financial support, school supplies and learning tools or educators, from one district to another within the Charleston County…

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From the Sea to the Table: Episode 1 - Ray DeeZy links up with Chef George in North Charleston to learn about Gullah Cuisine, while making friend cabbage, rice, shrimp, and clams