Follow The Chronicle On Twitter

Cuban MDs Head to Kenya to Teach and Learn

Following a health agreement signed last year, 100 Cuban doctors will travel to Kenya to fill gaps in specialty care at Kenyan hospitals. Fifty Kenyan doctors will be sent to Cuba for specialized training. Kenyan Cabinet Secretary for Health Sicily Kariuki said the visiting personnel would include critical care physicians – family physicians, physicists, oncologists…

Read More

Asylum-Seeking Mother and Daughter Reunited After Immigration Nightmare

After an episode described as both cruel and horrific, an asylum-seeking mother and her daughter were reunited this month in Chicago. The daughter, who just turned 7, had been held thousands of miles apart from her mother since November. According to an American Civil Liberties Union attorney representing the family, the mother and child fell…

Read More

No Voting Rights For The Diaspora, Zimbabwe Court Rules

Zimbabweans in the diaspora with money to invest are holding on to their wallets. An invitation to rebuild the country rings hollow without the right to vote, they say. This week, the Constitutional Court reviewed the case of three Zimbabweans living abroad and seeking voting rights. The court declined to rule on the case. “The…

Read More

Applications for Beverly J. Gilliam Scholarship for Foreign Study Open

The Beverly J. Gilliam Scholarship for Foreign Study offers financial assistance—up to $6,500—to students who already are accepted into recognized summer study abroad programs. The scholarship’s goals are to help students obtain international experiences that will allow them to become better world citizens and successfully compete in the global job market. Eligibility Criteria To qualify,…

Read More

White Australians Debate Fast-Track Visas For Afrikaners Fleeing Land Reform

Australia’s national security minister has proposed fast-tracking immigrant visas for white South Africans facing “horrific circumstances” under the newly-elected head of the African National Congress. Minister Peter Sutton said Australia should speed up the visas for white farmers who, he claimed, are being “persecuted” since South African President Cyril Ramaphosa endorsed transferring land ownership from…

Read More

Ghana Coal Miners Threaten National Walkout Over Profit-Driven Mining Layoffs

A South African mining company with a long-term contract to extract Ghana’s precious gold reserves is facing nationwide strikes after it announced plans to outsource some 2,000 jobs from their operations in Ghana. Gold Fields Ghana, which holds leases for 51,500 acres, produces about 550,000 ounces of gold per year at its Tarkwa mine and…

Read More

U.S. State Secretary Fired, Cutting Short Long-Awaited Africa Visit

An extended visit to Africa this month by the U.S. Secretary of State to mend fences after the President’s crude description of African and Caribbean countries was cut short this week by the dismissal of the embattled Secretary Rex Tillerson. It was the first tour of the continent by the now ex-Secretary who was the…

Read More

French Counterterror Scheme Draws Fire in Burkina Faso

The so-called French pillar of counterterrorism in West Africa drew fire this week from Islamic extremists who struck the French Embassy in Burkina Faso and that country’s army headquarters. Seven soldiers were reported killed, as were eight attackers. Over 80 persons were injured. The incident took place in Burkina’s famed capital city of Ouagadougou just…

Read More

New ANC President Endorses Transfer of Lands from Whites to Blacks

Barely a month into his presidency, Cyril Ramaphosa has taken sides on a hot button issue whose resolution had eluded previous leaders. He vowed to speed up the seizure of land from white owners and turn the properties over to blacks. “This original sin that was committed when our country was colonized must be resolved…

Read More

Mugabe Lets Loose in Fury at Former Allies Who Ousted Him

After weeks of silence, former Zimbabwe president Robert Mugabe came out of his shell and delivered a furious tirade against his one-time party allies who engineered his ouster last November in an action they called “Operation Restore Legacy.” In a rare display of resentment and bitterness Mugabe called his removal by military members of his…

Read More

Thousands of Students Go Hungry Every Day

By Dr. Michael Baston (TriceEdneyWire.com) – A 22-year old mother of two young children decides to go to class rather than pick up an extra shift at the doctor’s office where she works. The decision, while beneficial to her education, means she won’t have enough money to feed herself and her children sufficiently that month.…

The Gun Control Debate Ignores Black Lives

By Glenn Ellis (TriceEdneyWire.com) – Students from across the country walked out of class on March 14, 2018, at 10 a.m. to protest gun violence and demand new legislation. The students left classes for 17 minutes to commemorate the 17 lives lost in the Parkland school shooting. Some even left for 18 minutes to acknowledge…

MLK50: Heritage Foundation President Kay Coles James Remembers Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.

By Kay Coles James, President, The Heritage Foundation Fifty years ago today, America lost one of her greatest leaders, the Rev. Martin Luther King, Jr. Like so many who were alive on April 4, 1968, I clearly remember the shock I felt when I heard that Dr. King had been assassinated. On that fateful day,…

On 50th Anniversary of King Assassination, We Have Work to Do

By Jesse Jackson The 50th anniversary of Dr. Martin Luther King’s assassination comes amid a fierce struggle for the soul of America. We will celebrate the progress that has been made since Dr. King was taken from us in 1968, and decry the agenda that is still unfinished. But we cannot ignore the systematic effort…

Ask Dr. Kevin – Stigma In Sickle Cell Disease: How It Affects ED Care

By Dr. Kevin Williams, Chief Medical Officer, Pfizer Rare Disease Unit The “Ask Dr. Kevin” series is brought to you by Pfizer Rare Disease in collaboration with the National Newspaper Publishers Association (NNPA) to increase understanding of sickle cell disease. The opioid crisis in the United States is at an all-time high, impacting thousands of…

What a Difference a Director Makes at CFPB: Trump Appointee Makes Changes to Help Companies, Not Consumers

By Charlene Crowell In 1959, the late Dinah Washington (1924-1963) won a Grammy Award for her R&B hit song, “What a Difference a Day Makes”. The song tells the story of how a blossoming romance dramatically changed life – for the better. Its last lyrics, conclude that “the difference is you”. When I consider the…

Memorial Day: “Who Else But A Soldier”

By Beverly Gadson-Birch   Special recognition goes out to our veterans and those who sacrificed their life in the name of freedom.  Each year as we observe Memorial Day, I am reminded of my dad and his appreciation of veterans. Dad wasn’t a veteran; but he never missed the opportunity on Decoration Day to take…

Read More
Discipline Determines Destiny

By Barney Blakeney   Two phone calls over the past couple of weeks again got me thinking about Black folks taking the initiative to determine our own destiny. I’ve got a thing on my desk that says “Discipline, not desire, determines our destiny”. Wish I woulda, coulda, shoulda doesn’t get it done. We must exercise…

Read More
Muslim Women Embrace Ramadan

By Hakim Abdul-Ali   The world’s almost two billion adherents of the Islamic faith began their annual month-long fasting period today. It’s the time of the year when sincere Muslims fast from dawn to sunset each day,abstaining from food, water and having sex with their spouses during the daily fasting period and also performing extra…

Read More
Respect Builds Character and Business

By Beverly Gadson-Birch Two Black men appropriately dressed enters Starbucks to meet a friend to discuss business over a cup of coffee and find themselves handcuffed and carted off to jail. Why? They asked to use the restroom without making a purchase. Really? At one of this country’s most prestigious institutions, Yale, a White student…

Read More
Thirty Years After Her Death Septima Clark Still Teaches

By Barney Blakeney The May 3 unveiling of the marker noting the birthplace of Septima Poinsette Clark was more powerful than I thought it would be. The College of Charleston coordinated the event that included a luncheon and portrait unveiling honoring a woman too few realize was responsible for contributing to much of what America…

Read More
Hailing the Mothers of Our Culture

By Hakim Abdul-Ali Next Sunday in the good old USA, there will be an observance day usually set aside for  the yearly recognition and valued appreciation of the past and present mothers in our lives. Traditionally, it’s called Mother’s Day. With the greatest respect to all the women in America, who are mothers of their…

Read More
Formal response to proposal to erect African American Confederate Monument

The members of the South Carolina African American Heritage Commission would like to register our opposition to the ill-informed proposal to erect a monument in honor of South Carolina’s Civil War-era African American Confederate pensioners. First, we all can agree that the idea of a monument to recognize the significant role African Americans played in the Civil War is a worthwhile pursuit. However, a…

Read More
Half of What You See

By Joyce Green   As I look out over Charleston, South Carolina I see a magical place girdled by water. I see sunsets in the seductive sky that carry me too deep into thoughts of yesterday. I see tourists roaming around in the bliss of preserved aesthetics, riding horse drawn carriages, listening to stories that…

Read More
Quality Education Project Weighs In On Garrett Academy’s Fate Ahead of CCSD Board Vote

The Quality Education Project (QEP), a community and research-based organization that seeks to implement a quality education for all students within the public school system, submitted the following statement regarding the future of Garrett Academy of Technology: On Monday, the Charleston County School Board will vote to determine the location of the new Center for…

Read More
What kind of fools…?

By Gwen Bobo It seems to me that the more dastardly things politicians do . . . the less we seem to hold them accountable.   They are costing the taxpayers billions of dollars by their “private agenda” decisions with no regard as to how their blatant disregard of reasoning impacts all of us. After…

Read More
Loading Family Features Content Widget
Loading Family Features Article

Take Our Poll

Do you want to the Justice Department to release its Community Oriented Policing Services assessment of the North Charleston Police Department?

View Results

Loading ... Loading ...

In this episode of “Meet The Black Press,” NNPA Podcast Host Akil Wilson talks to James Washington, the publisher of The Dallas Weekly, about the business of running a Black newspaper and the future of the Black Press