Event Calendar

< 2019 >
January 06 - January 12
  • 06
    06.January.Sunday

    Southbound: Photographs of and about the New South

    11:00 am-4:00 pm
    Jan-06-19-May-20-19
    Halsey Institute of Contemporary Art
    161 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC

    Southbound: Photographs of and about the New South is an unprecedented photography exhibition co-curated by Mark Sloan, director and chief curator of the Halsey Institute of Contemporary Art, and Mark Long, professor of political science, both of whom are on the faculty of the College of Charleston, in South Carolina.

    Southbound embraces the conundrum of its name. To be southbound is to journey to a place in flux, radically transformed over recent decades, yet also to the place where the past resonates most insistently in the United States. To be southbound is also to confront the weight of preconceived notions about this place, thick with stereotypes, encoded in the artistic, literary, and media records. Southbound engages with and unsettles assumed narratives about this contested region by providing fresh perspectives for understanding the complex admixture of history, geography, and culture that constitutes today’s New South.

    Southbound will comprise fifty-six photographers’ visions of the South over the first decades of the twenty-first century. Accordingly, it offers a composite image of the region. The photographs echo stories told about the South as a bastion of tradition, as a region remade through Americanization and globalization, and as a land full of surprising realities. The project’s purpose is to investigate senses of place in the South that congeal, however fleetingly, in the spaces between the photographers’ looking, their images, and our own preexisting ideas about the region.

    Recognizing the complexity of understanding any place, let alone one as charged as the American South, the curators’ approach is transdisciplinary. The photographs will be complemented by a commissioned video, an interactive digital mapping environment, an extensive stand-alone website, and a comprehensive exhibition catalogue. This publication will draw on expertise from disciplines in the arts, humanities, and social sciences.

    The history of the American South is among the most storied of any region in the world. As a result of the vitality of its culture and the diversity of its inhabitants—to say nothing about the salience of photography in the U.S.—the region has also come to be among the most photographed. Through the exhibition, video, remappings, website, and catalogue—separately and in tandem—the Southbound project charts new courses to expanded imaginings for the twenty-first century South.

    Southbound is supported by the National Endowment for the Arts and the Robert Mapplethorpe Foundation. The exhibition will debut simultaneously at the Halsey Institute of Contemporary Art and the City Gallery at Waterfront Park.

  • 07
    07.January.Monday

    Southbound: Photographs of and about the New South

    11:00 am-4:00 pm
    Jan-07-19-May-21-19
    Halsey Institute of Contemporary Art
    161 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC

    Southbound: Photographs of and about the New South is an unprecedented photography exhibition co-curated by Mark Sloan, director and chief curator of the Halsey Institute of Contemporary Art, and Mark Long, professor of political science, both of whom are on the faculty of the College of Charleston, in South Carolina.

    Southbound embraces the conundrum of its name. To be southbound is to journey to a place in flux, radically transformed over recent decades, yet also to the place where the past resonates most insistently in the United States. To be southbound is also to confront the weight of preconceived notions about this place, thick with stereotypes, encoded in the artistic, literary, and media records. Southbound engages with and unsettles assumed narratives about this contested region by providing fresh perspectives for understanding the complex admixture of history, geography, and culture that constitutes today’s New South.

    Southbound will comprise fifty-six photographers’ visions of the South over the first decades of the twenty-first century. Accordingly, it offers a composite image of the region. The photographs echo stories told about the South as a bastion of tradition, as a region remade through Americanization and globalization, and as a land full of surprising realities. The project’s purpose is to investigate senses of place in the South that congeal, however fleetingly, in the spaces between the photographers’ looking, their images, and our own preexisting ideas about the region.

    Recognizing the complexity of understanding any place, let alone one as charged as the American South, the curators’ approach is transdisciplinary. The photographs will be complemented by a commissioned video, an interactive digital mapping environment, an extensive stand-alone website, and a comprehensive exhibition catalogue. This publication will draw on expertise from disciplines in the arts, humanities, and social sciences.

    The history of the American South is among the most storied of any region in the world. As a result of the vitality of its culture and the diversity of its inhabitants—to say nothing about the salience of photography in the U.S.—the region has also come to be among the most photographed. Through the exhibition, video, remappings, website, and catalogue—separately and in tandem—the Southbound project charts new courses to expanded imaginings for the twenty-first century South.

    Southbound is supported by the National Endowment for the Arts and the Robert Mapplethorpe Foundation. The exhibition will debut simultaneously at the Halsey Institute of Contemporary Art and the City Gallery at Waterfront Park.

  • 08
    08.January.Tuesday

    Southbound: Photographs of and about the New South

    11:00 am-4:00 pm
    Jan-08-19-May-22-19
    Halsey Institute of Contemporary Art
    161 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC

    Southbound: Photographs of and about the New South is an unprecedented photography exhibition co-curated by Mark Sloan, director and chief curator of the Halsey Institute of Contemporary Art, and Mark Long, professor of political science, both of whom are on the faculty of the College of Charleston, in South Carolina.

    Southbound embraces the conundrum of its name. To be southbound is to journey to a place in flux, radically transformed over recent decades, yet also to the place where the past resonates most insistently in the United States. To be southbound is also to confront the weight of preconceived notions about this place, thick with stereotypes, encoded in the artistic, literary, and media records. Southbound engages with and unsettles assumed narratives about this contested region by providing fresh perspectives for understanding the complex admixture of history, geography, and culture that constitutes today’s New South.

    Southbound will comprise fifty-six photographers’ visions of the South over the first decades of the twenty-first century. Accordingly, it offers a composite image of the region. The photographs echo stories told about the South as a bastion of tradition, as a region remade through Americanization and globalization, and as a land full of surprising realities. The project’s purpose is to investigate senses of place in the South that congeal, however fleetingly, in the spaces between the photographers’ looking, their images, and our own preexisting ideas about the region.

    Recognizing the complexity of understanding any place, let alone one as charged as the American South, the curators’ approach is transdisciplinary. The photographs will be complemented by a commissioned video, an interactive digital mapping environment, an extensive stand-alone website, and a comprehensive exhibition catalogue. This publication will draw on expertise from disciplines in the arts, humanities, and social sciences.

    The history of the American South is among the most storied of any region in the world. As a result of the vitality of its culture and the diversity of its inhabitants—to say nothing about the salience of photography in the U.S.—the region has also come to be among the most photographed. Through the exhibition, video, remappings, website, and catalogue—separately and in tandem—the Southbound project charts new courses to expanded imaginings for the twenty-first century South.

    Southbound is supported by the National Endowment for the Arts and the Robert Mapplethorpe Foundation. The exhibition will debut simultaneously at the Halsey Institute of Contemporary Art and the City Gallery at Waterfront Park.

  • 09
    09.January.Wednesday

    Restaurant Week at The Watch

    All day
    Jan-09-19-Jan-12-19
    The Watch Rooftop & Spirits
    75 WENTWORTH STREET CHARLESTON, SC 29401

    Join us at The Watch to indulge in 3 Courses for $30 dollars in celebration of Charleston Restaurant Week!

    Southbound: Photographs of and about the New South

    11:00 am-4:00 pm
    Jan-09-19-May-23-19
    Halsey Institute of Contemporary Art
    161 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC

    Southbound: Photographs of and about the New South is an unprecedented photography exhibition co-curated by Mark Sloan, director and chief curator of the Halsey Institute of Contemporary Art, and Mark Long, professor of political science, both of whom are on the faculty of the College of Charleston, in South Carolina.

    Southbound embraces the conundrum of its name. To be southbound is to journey to a place in flux, radically transformed over recent decades, yet also to the place where the past resonates most insistently in the United States. To be southbound is also to confront the weight of preconceived notions about this place, thick with stereotypes, encoded in the artistic, literary, and media records. Southbound engages with and unsettles assumed narratives about this contested region by providing fresh perspectives for understanding the complex admixture of history, geography, and culture that constitutes today’s New South.

    Southbound will comprise fifty-six photographers’ visions of the South over the first decades of the twenty-first century. Accordingly, it offers a composite image of the region. The photographs echo stories told about the South as a bastion of tradition, as a region remade through Americanization and globalization, and as a land full of surprising realities. The project’s purpose is to investigate senses of place in the South that congeal, however fleetingly, in the spaces between the photographers’ looking, their images, and our own preexisting ideas about the region.

    Recognizing the complexity of understanding any place, let alone one as charged as the American South, the curators’ approach is transdisciplinary. The photographs will be complemented by a commissioned video, an interactive digital mapping environment, an extensive stand-alone website, and a comprehensive exhibition catalogue. This publication will draw on expertise from disciplines in the arts, humanities, and social sciences.

    The history of the American South is among the most storied of any region in the world. As a result of the vitality of its culture and the diversity of its inhabitants—to say nothing about the salience of photography in the U.S.—the region has also come to be among the most photographed. Through the exhibition, video, remappings, website, and catalogue—separately and in tandem—the Southbound project charts new courses to expanded imaginings for the twenty-first century South.

    Southbound is supported by the National Endowment for the Arts and the Robert Mapplethorpe Foundation. The exhibition will debut simultaneously at the Halsey Institute of Contemporary Art and the City Gallery at Waterfront Park.

  • 10
    10.January.Thursday

    Lafayette 148 Spring Pop-Up Shop

    10:00 am-7:00 pm
    Jan-10-19-Jan-12-19

    Discover Lafayette 148 New York’s new spring 2019 collection, Venetian Dream, featuring timeless and essential, go-to pieces. From feminine, fit-and-flare shapes and painterly prints drawn from the era’s modernist art and vibrant landscape hues, these pieces are tailored with ease and effortlessness. Pre-order any style before it’s available in store. Enjoy wine and bubbly while you consult with Lafayette size and style advisers. Available in petite and plus.

     

     

    Southbound: Photographs of and about the New South

    11:00 am-4:00 pm
    Jan-10-19-May-24-19
    Halsey Institute of Contemporary Art
    161 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC

    Southbound: Photographs of and about the New South is an unprecedented photography exhibition co-curated by Mark Sloan, director and chief curator of the Halsey Institute of Contemporary Art, and Mark Long, professor of political science, both of whom are on the faculty of the College of Charleston, in South Carolina.

    Southbound embraces the conundrum of its name. To be southbound is to journey to a place in flux, radically transformed over recent decades, yet also to the place where the past resonates most insistently in the United States. To be southbound is also to confront the weight of preconceived notions about this place, thick with stereotypes, encoded in the artistic, literary, and media records. Southbound engages with and unsettles assumed narratives about this contested region by providing fresh perspectives for understanding the complex admixture of history, geography, and culture that constitutes today’s New South.

    Southbound will comprise fifty-six photographers’ visions of the South over the first decades of the twenty-first century. Accordingly, it offers a composite image of the region. The photographs echo stories told about the South as a bastion of tradition, as a region remade through Americanization and globalization, and as a land full of surprising realities. The project’s purpose is to investigate senses of place in the South that congeal, however fleetingly, in the spaces between the photographers’ looking, their images, and our own preexisting ideas about the region.

    Recognizing the complexity of understanding any place, let alone one as charged as the American South, the curators’ approach is transdisciplinary. The photographs will be complemented by a commissioned video, an interactive digital mapping environment, an extensive stand-alone website, and a comprehensive exhibition catalogue. This publication will draw on expertise from disciplines in the arts, humanities, and social sciences.

    The history of the American South is among the most storied of any region in the world. As a result of the vitality of its culture and the diversity of its inhabitants—to say nothing about the salience of photography in the U.S.—the region has also come to be among the most photographed. Through the exhibition, video, remappings, website, and catalogue—separately and in tandem—the Southbound project charts new courses to expanded imaginings for the twenty-first century South.

    Southbound is supported by the National Endowment for the Arts and the Robert Mapplethorpe Foundation. The exhibition will debut simultaneously at the Halsey Institute of Contemporary Art and the City Gallery at Waterfront Park.

  • 11
    11.January.Friday

    The Entrepreneurial Kickback

    7:00 am-10:00 am
    Jan-11-19
    Olde Village Community Building
    4820 Jenkins Avenue, North Charleston, SC 29405

    Refreshment + Networking + Information + Relaxation – This event is for entrepreneurs/business owners to have fun, fellowship, network, share their business experiences with and learn from one another in a relaxed setting. Your $20 investment includes an art activity, hors d’oeuvres, Klarity bag, and The Ultimate KKP Experience! There will also be giveaways! For more information, contact Krystal Klear Productions at (843) 608-9416 or KrystalKlearProductions1@gmail.com. #TheEntrepreneurialKickback #TEK #KKPEntrepreneurialKickback #KKPKickback

    Southbound: Photographs of and about the New South

    11:00 am-4:00 pm
    Jan-11-19-May-25-19
    Halsey Institute of Contemporary Art
    161 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC

    Southbound: Photographs of and about the New South is an unprecedented photography exhibition co-curated by Mark Sloan, director and chief curator of the Halsey Institute of Contemporary Art, and Mark Long, professor of political science, both of whom are on the faculty of the College of Charleston, in South Carolina.

    Southbound embraces the conundrum of its name. To be southbound is to journey to a place in flux, radically transformed over recent decades, yet also to the place where the past resonates most insistently in the United States. To be southbound is also to confront the weight of preconceived notions about this place, thick with stereotypes, encoded in the artistic, literary, and media records. Southbound engages with and unsettles assumed narratives about this contested region by providing fresh perspectives for understanding the complex admixture of history, geography, and culture that constitutes today’s New South.

    Southbound will comprise fifty-six photographers’ visions of the South over the first decades of the twenty-first century. Accordingly, it offers a composite image of the region. The photographs echo stories told about the South as a bastion of tradition, as a region remade through Americanization and globalization, and as a land full of surprising realities. The project’s purpose is to investigate senses of place in the South that congeal, however fleetingly, in the spaces between the photographers’ looking, their images, and our own preexisting ideas about the region.

    Recognizing the complexity of understanding any place, let alone one as charged as the American South, the curators’ approach is transdisciplinary. The photographs will be complemented by a commissioned video, an interactive digital mapping environment, an extensive stand-alone website, and a comprehensive exhibition catalogue. This publication will draw on expertise from disciplines in the arts, humanities, and social sciences.

    The history of the American South is among the most storied of any region in the world. As a result of the vitality of its culture and the diversity of its inhabitants—to say nothing about the salience of photography in the U.S.—the region has also come to be among the most photographed. Through the exhibition, video, remappings, website, and catalogue—separately and in tandem—the Southbound project charts new courses to expanded imaginings for the twenty-first century South.

    Southbound is supported by the National Endowment for the Arts and the Robert Mapplethorpe Foundation. The exhibition will debut simultaneously at the Halsey Institute of Contemporary Art and the City Gallery at Waterfront Park.

    #UNAPOLOGETIC, keynote talk by Sheila Pree Bright

    7:00 pm-9:00 pm
    Jan-11-19
    Sottile Theatre
    44 George Street, Charleston, SC 29403

    Sheila Pree Bright is the opening keynote speaker for the Halsey Institute of Contemporary Art‘s symposium, Public Memory in the New South.

    The Public Memory in the New South symposium kicks off on Friday evening with a keynote lecture by Southbound photographer Sheila Pree Bright. The symposium’s purpose is to arrive at new understandings of how our collective memories ultimately reflect and inform how we experience this place and to take stock of ways in which our sense of ourselves is changing in the New South.

    Sheila Pree Bright is a photographer based in Atlanta. Bright’s sustained focus on the African American experience in the South has entailed projects that range from the most apparently banal, suburban living, to the most charged, the Black Lives Matter protests in the region and beyond over recent years. Bright’s work also showcases a profound historical sensitivity, as seen for example in her 1960Who series, in which she wheat-pasted on buildings across Atlanta her portraits of locally significant but nationally unsung heroes of the civil rights movement in the mid-twentieth century, afterwards making photographs of those public art installations.

    Bright’s photographs in Southbound are drawn from her #1960Nowseries, which examines race, gender, and generational divides to raise awareness of millennial perspectives on civil and human rights. With a focus on capturing the efforts of emerging young leaders affiliated with the Black Lives Matter movement, Bright has made photographs on the front lines of demonstrations in Ferguson, Baltimore, and Atlanta, among many other places.

    Bright’s lecture is co-presented by the Avery Research Center for African American History and Culture, with support from the College of Charleston’s Sustainability Literacy Institute.
    ___________________________________

    The symposium continues on Saturday!
    10:00 AM – 4:00 PM | College of Charleston School of Sciences and Mathematics Auditorium | 202 Calhoun St.

    Dr. Adam H. Domby | What Were They Supposed to Mean: Confederate Monuments in the Eyes of their Builders | 10:00 AM

    Dr. Thomas Brown | Civil War Monuments and Photography | 10:30 AM

    Jeanine Michna-Bales | Through Darkness to Light: Photographs Along the Underground Railroad | 11:00 AM

    Jessica Ingram | Visualizing Violence in the American South in Road Through Midnight: A Civil Rights Memorial | 11:30 AM

    Dr. Thavolia Glymph | Posing/Posed for the Camera: The Right to Look Back in Possession of One’s Self | 2:00 PM

    Anderson Scott | The Selective Memory of the South | 2:30 PM

    Eliot Dudik | Memory, Beauty, and Humor as Unifying Forces | 3:00 PM

    Brenda Tindal | K(NO)W Justice K(NO)W Peace: Reckoning & the Making of a Rapid Response Exhibit in a New South City | 3:30 PM

    Michael Arad | Memory in the Public Realm: Making the Past Present | 7:00 PM

    FIND OUT MORE HERE: http://halsey.cofc.edu/events/upcoming/

    Groundhog Gravy Live at The Mill

    9:00 pm-1:00 am
    Jan-11-19-Jan-12-19
    The Mill
    1026 E Montague Ave North Charleston, South Carolina

    Groundhog Gravy will be playing dynamic, electric music that dips and dives into rock, reggae, and funk. Bring your dancing shoes and come Get Your Gravy On!

  • 12
    12.January.Saturday

    Phi Beta Sigma Fraternity, Inc., Founders' Day Breakfast

    9:00 am-12:00 pm
    Jan-12-19
    Embassy Suites by Hilton Charleston Airport Hotel & Convention Center
    5055 International Boulevard, North Charleston, SC 29418

    On behalf of the Brothers of Phi Beta Sigma Fraternity, Inc, Iota Theta Sigma, North Charleston, SC.  We are pleased to invite you to attend our Founders’ Day Breakfast.  This will mark our great Fraternity’s 105th year embodying our motto “Culture For Service and Service For Humanity” and promote brotherhood, scholarship and service.

    Phi Beta Sigma Fraternity was founded at Howard University in Washington, D.C., January 9, 1914, by three young African-American male students. The Founders, Honorable A. Langston Taylor, Honorable Leonard F. Morse, and Honorable Charles I. Brown, wanted to organize a Greek letter fraternity that would truly exemplify the ideals of brotherhood, scholarship, and service.

    The dynamic speakers this year will be:

    • Bro. Dr. Lawrence L. Rouse, Phi Beta Sigma Fraternity, Inc. Southeastern Regional Director.
    • Bro. Corey D. McClary, Councilman, Goose Creek, SC
    • William J. Milton, Jr., Certified Financial Planner, Oak Capital Management
    • Shaundra Young Scott, Esq., Executive Director, ACLU South Carolina

    So please come out and support this noted worthy event.

    The cost of ticket will be $25.00 per person.  As the tickets are limted, don’t hestitate to buy now!!

    You can also pay by Cash App – $mrsigma2019 ~ or ~ Paypal – iotathetasigma2016@gmail.com

    No refunds

    FOR QUESTIONS CONCERNING THE EVENT OR PURCHASING TICKETS, CONTACT BROTHER BAKARI JACKSON OR BROTHER KEVIN BLAKE AT 843-900-4269, IOTATHETA0SIGMA@GMAIL.COM

    Public Memory in the New South, a symposium

    10:00 am-4:00 pm
    Jan-12-19
    College of Charleston School of Science and Math
    202 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC 29403

    The Halsey Institute of Contemporary Art presents a symposium, Public Memory in the New South, in connection with their current exhibition, Southbound: Photographs of and about the New South.

    Over recent months and years, as white Southerners’ hold over Southern history and memory is called into question, landscapes in the South are experiencing profound change. Monuments to the region’s charged past continue to be contested and removed from statehouse grounds, college campuses and the heart of the region’s downtowns. Meanwhile, galvanizing new markers speak to places and memories long forgotten by many, notably in Montgomery’s National Memorial for Peace and Justice and Charleston’s planned International African American Museum.


    The Southbound symposium on Public Memory in the New South is concerned with what we remember and forget, and how we choose to frame our recollections to arrive at a collective sense of who we are in today’s South. It brings together exhibiting artists whose photographic projects document sites of memory ranging from the almost invisible to the forgotten, the ephemeral, the performed, and the, sometimes, hidden in plain sight. It also features scholars, curators, and activists who are challenging taken for granted memorialization of one vision for southern history, synonymous with the region itself for many here and further afield. Public Memory in the New South advocates for more complex readings of the region to be central to public memory here.

    The symposium’s purpose is to arrive at new understandings of how our collective memories ultimately reflect and inform how we experience this place and to take stock of ways in which our sense of ourselves is changing in the New South.

    The Public Memory in the New South symposium kicks off on Friday evening with a keynote lecture by Southbound photographer Sheila Pree Bright. The symposium continues on Saturday with sessions from 10AM-4PM. Public Memory in the New South ends with a keynote address by Michael Arad, the NYC-based designer of the 9/11 Memorial and Charleston’s forthcoming Mother Emanuel AME Memorial.

    ___________________________________
    Friday, January 11
    7:00 PM | Sottile Theatre, College of Charleston
    Sheila Pree Bright, keynote address | #UNAPOLOGETIC


    Saturday, January 12
    10:00 AM – 4:00 PM | College of Charleston School of Sciences and Mathematics Auditorium | 202 Calhoun Street

    Dr. Adam H. Domby | What Were They Supposed to Mean: Confederate Monuments in the Eyes of their Builders | 10:00 AM

    Dr. Thomas Brown | Civil War Monuments and Photography | 10:30 AM

    Jeanine Michna-Bales | Through Darkness to Light: Photographs Along the Underground Railroad | 11:00 AM

    Jessica Ingram | Visualizing Violence in the American South in Road Through Midnight: A Civil Rights Memorial | 11:30 AM

    -lunch break-

    Dr. Thavolia Glymph | Posing/Posed for the Camera: The Right to Look Back in Possession of One’s Self | 2:00 PM

    Anderson Scott | The Selective Memory of the South | 2:30 PM

    Eliot Dudik | Memory, Beauty, and Humor as Unifying Forces | 3:00 PM

    Brenda Tindal | K(NO)W Justice K(NO)W Peace: Reckoning & the Making of a Rapid Response Exhibit in a New South City | 3:30 PM

    -dinner break-

    Michael Arad | Memory in the Public Realm: Making the Past Present | 7:00 PM

    ________________________
    FIND OUT MORE HERE: http://halsey.cofc.edu/events/upcoming/

    Southbound: Photographs of and about the New South

    11:00 am-4:00 pm
    Jan-12-19-May-26-19
    Halsey Institute of Contemporary Art
    161 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC

    Southbound: Photographs of and about the New South is an unprecedented photography exhibition co-curated by Mark Sloan, director and chief curator of the Halsey Institute of Contemporary Art, and Mark Long, professor of political science, both of whom are on the faculty of the College of Charleston, in South Carolina.

    Southbound embraces the conundrum of its name. To be southbound is to journey to a place in flux, radically transformed over recent decades, yet also to the place where the past resonates most insistently in the United States. To be southbound is also to confront the weight of preconceived notions about this place, thick with stereotypes, encoded in the artistic, literary, and media records. Southbound engages with and unsettles assumed narratives about this contested region by providing fresh perspectives for understanding the complex admixture of history, geography, and culture that constitutes today’s New South.

    Southbound will comprise fifty-six photographers’ visions of the South over the first decades of the twenty-first century. Accordingly, it offers a composite image of the region. The photographs echo stories told about the South as a bastion of tradition, as a region remade through Americanization and globalization, and as a land full of surprising realities. The project’s purpose is to investigate senses of place in the South that congeal, however fleetingly, in the spaces between the photographers’ looking, their images, and our own preexisting ideas about the region.

    Recognizing the complexity of understanding any place, let alone one as charged as the American South, the curators’ approach is transdisciplinary. The photographs will be complemented by a commissioned video, an interactive digital mapping environment, an extensive stand-alone website, and a comprehensive exhibition catalogue. This publication will draw on expertise from disciplines in the arts, humanities, and social sciences.

    The history of the American South is among the most storied of any region in the world. As a result of the vitality of its culture and the diversity of its inhabitants—to say nothing about the salience of photography in the U.S.—the region has also come to be among the most photographed. Through the exhibition, video, remappings, website, and catalogue—separately and in tandem—the Southbound project charts new courses to expanded imaginings for the twenty-first century South.

    Southbound is supported by the National Endowment for the Arts and the Robert Mapplethorpe Foundation. The exhibition will debut simultaneously at the Halsey Institute of Contemporary Art and the City Gallery at Waterfront Park.

    Southbound: Closing keynote address by Michael Arad

    7:00 pm-9:00 pm
    Jan-12-19
    College of Charleston School of Science and Math
    202 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC 29403

    The Halsey Institute of Contemporary Art presents the symposium Public Memory in the New South in conjunction with their current exhibition, Southbound: Photographs of and about the New South. Micheal Arad is the closing keynote address for this symposium. The full symposium is free admission and the public is encouraged to attend.

    Over recent months and years, as white Southerners’ hold over Southern history and memory is called into question, landscapes in the South are experiencing profound change. Monuments to the region’s charged past continue to be contested and removed from statehouse grounds, college campuses and the heart of the region’s downtowns. Meanwhile, galvanizing new markers speak to places and memories long forgotten by many, notably in Montgomery’s National Memorial for Peace and Justice and Charleston’s planned International African American Museum. 

    The Southbound symposium on Public Memory in the New South is concerned with what we remember and forget, and how we choose to frame our recollections to arrive at a collective sense of who we are in today’s South. It brings together exhibiting artists whose photographic projects document sites of memory ranging from the almost invisible to the forgotten, the ephemeral, the performed, and the, sometimes, hidden in plain sight. It also features scholars, curators, and activists who are challenging taken for granted memorialization of one vision for southern history, synonymous with the region itself for many here and further afield. Public Memory in the New South advocates for more complex readings of the region to be central to public memory here.

    The symposium’s purpose is to arrive at new understandings of how our collective memories ultimately reflect and inform how we experience this place and to take stock of ways in which our sense of ourselves is changing in the New South.

    The Public Memory in the New South symposium kicks off on Friday evening with a keynote lecture by Southbound photographer Sheila Pree Bright. The symposium continues on Saturday with sessions from 10AM-4PM. Public Memory in the New South ends with a keynote address by Michael Arad, the NYC-based designer of the 9/11 Memorial and Charleston’s forthcoming Mother Emanuel AME Memorial.

    ___________________________________
    Friday, January 11
    7:00 PM | Sottile Theatre, College of Charleston
    Sheila Pree Bright, keynote address | #UNAPOLOGETIC


    Saturday, January 12
    10:00 AM – 4:00 PM | College of Charleston School of Sciences and Mathematics Auditorium | 202 Calhoun Street

    Dr. Adam H. Domby | What Were They Supposed to Mean: Confederate Monuments in the Eyes of their Builders | 10:00 AM

    Dr. Thomas Brown | Civil War Monuments and Photography | 10:30 AM

    Jeanine Michna-Bales | Through Darkness to Light: Photographs Along the Underground Railroad | 11:00 AM

    Jessica Ingram | Visualizing Violence in the American South in Road Through Midnight: A Civil Rights Memorial | 11:30 AM

    -lunch break-

    Dr. Thavolia Glymph | Posing/Posed for the Camera: The Right to Look Back in Possession of One’s Self | 2:00 PM

    Anderson Scott | The Selective Memory of the South | 2:30 PM

    Eliot Dudik | Memory, Beauty, and Humor as Unifying Forces | 3:00 PM

    Brenda Tindal | K(NO)W Justice K(NO)W Peace: Reckoning & the Making of a Rapid Response Exhibit in a New South City | 3:30 PM

    -dinner break-

    Michael Arad, keynote address | Memory in the Public Realm: Making the Past Present | 7:00 PM

    ________________________
    FIND OUT MORE HERE: http://halsey.cofc.edu/events/upcoming/