Event Calendar

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September
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  • When I First Remember – Season 3
    7:00 pm-9:00 pm
    Oct-04-18-Jan-24-19

    222 Calhoun St., Charleston, SC 29401

    222 Calhoun St., Charleston, SC 29401

    ‘When I First Remember’, an interactive musical play by Lady In White Productions. Experience a journey through the eyes and the voices of the Gullah Geechee heritage and community, a blend of true events from the city of Historic Charleston’s slave trade and the survival of the enslaved Africans. ‘When I First Remember’, a bittersweet story filled with commemorations dedicated to the storytelling, dancing, and music of the Gullah Geechee Culture, rooted right here in the Lowcountry.

    The evening continues with a marketplace where attendees can meet the actors as well as purchase artisan crafts, goods and cuisine from local Gullah-Geechee vendor.

    Facebook.com/WhenIFirstRemember

    VENUE: OLD BETHEL UNITED METHODIST CHURCH
    222 Calhoun St.
    Charleston, SC 29401

    ADMISSION: $21

    ADVANCED TICKETS:
    Charleston Visitors Center
    375 Meeting St, Charleston, SC 29403

    DOOR TICKETS: 6:30PM

    CAST
    Samelia Adams – Director
    Queen E Atterberry – Conjure Woman and Producer
    Rose Atterberry – Momma Hattie
    Duane Branch – Buster
    Morganne Lamberth – Tissie
    Chaquis Maliqi – Olivia the SongBird
    Sharon Cooper-Murray – The Gullah Lady
    Leneke G. Washington – Elsie

    Learn more at: WhenIFirstRemember.com/cast

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  • Steven Curtis Chapman
    7:00 pm-11:00 pm
    Oct-05-18

    37 John Street Charleston, South Carolina

    37 John Street Charleston, South Carolina

    Public on sale: Friday, June 1 at 10AM EST Dinner & Show option available for an additional $32 Call for reservations after purchasing Dinner & Show option Dinner at Vincent Chicco’s – (843) 203-3002 Dinner at Virginia’s on King – (843) 735-5800 CLICK HERE for Details and Menu Options Tickets can also be purchased at Music Hall Box Office: 37 John Street (843) 853-2252 | Monday – Friday (10 am – 3 pm) Ticketfly Hotline: (877) 987-6487 | Everyday (10 am – 9 pm)

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  • When I First Remember – Season 3
    7:00 pm-9:00 pm
    Oct-11-18-Jan-31-19

    222 Calhoun St., Charleston, SC 29401

    222 Calhoun St., Charleston, SC 29401

    ‘When I First Remember’, an interactive musical play by Lady In White Productions. Experience a journey through the eyes and the voices of the Gullah Geechee heritage and community, a blend of true events from the city of Historic Charleston’s slave trade and the survival of the enslaved Africans. ‘When I First Remember’, a bittersweet story filled with commemorations dedicated to the storytelling, dancing, and music of the Gullah Geechee Culture, rooted right here in the Lowcountry.

    The evening continues with a marketplace where attendees can meet the actors as well as purchase artisan crafts, goods and cuisine from local Gullah-Geechee vendor.

    Facebook.com/WhenIFirstRemember

    VENUE: OLD BETHEL UNITED METHODIST CHURCH
    222 Calhoun St.
    Charleston, SC 29401

    ADMISSION: $21

    ADVANCED TICKETS:
    Charleston Visitors Center
    375 Meeting St, Charleston, SC 29403

    DOOR TICKETS: 6:30PM

    CAST
    Samelia Adams – Director
    Queen E Atterberry – Conjure Woman and Producer
    Rose Atterberry – Momma Hattie
    Duane Branch – Buster
    Morganne Lamberth – Tissie
    Chaquis Maliqi – Olivia the SongBird
    Sharon Cooper-Murray – The Gullah Lady
    Leneke G. Washington – Elsie

    Learn more at: WhenIFirstRemember.com/cast

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  • The Legacy of Slavery: Five Movements by Kwame Nimako
    All day
    Oct-15-18-Oct-16-18

    Using the concepts of ‘parallel lives’ and ‘intertwined belongings’ as backdrop, Dr. Kwame Nimako will demonstrate in this lecture that the legacy of Atlantic slavery has given rise to five distinctively racialized movements on the subject of slavery. The five movements in question are: remembrance and commemorations, reparations, anniversaries, museums, and the movement to combat so-called ‘modern’ slavery. At the forefront of the demands for remembrance/commemoration, anniversary, and reparation is Black agency and activism; the museums and ‘modern’ slavery initiatives are predominantly white Euro-American. Reception to follow.

  • Charleston MS Community Connection
    6:00 pm-7:45 pm
    Oct-15-18

    1662 Savannah Highway

    1662 Savannah Highway

    A group of the National MS Society offering peer-led support to share experiences and gain knowledge on various aspects of living and coping with MS.  All affected by MS are welcome.

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  • “Last Seen”: Finding Family After Slavery
    6:00 pm-1:39 pm
    Oct-17-18-Oct-18-18

    “Last Seen”: Finding Family After Slavery offers researchers a tool for telling family stories of separation and survival during slavery, emancipation, and the Civil War. It offers easy access to digitized “Information Wanted” advertisements placed in newspapers by former slaves and United States Colored Troops searching for family members lost by sale, flight, or enlistment.

    The ads mention family members, often by name, but also by physical description, circumstances of separation, last seen locations, and at times by the name of a former slave master. The earliest ads appeared in papers in 1863, and they continued for more than thirty years. “Last Seen”: Finding Family After Slavery allows users to search these ads by proper names, locations, circumstances of separation, military regiments, and events.

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  • The Entrepreneurial Kickback: The Business Brunch Edition
    7:00 am-10:00 am
    Oct-19-18

    2070 Northbrook Blvd., Suite A5, North Charleston, SC 29406

    2070 Northbrook Blvd., Suite A5, North Charleston, SC 29406

    Refreshment + Networking + Information + Relaxation – This event is for entrepreneurs/potential business owners to have fun, fellowship, network, share their business experiences with and learn from one another in a relaxed setting.

    Join us for the last TEK event of the year! Remember, it’s a kickback, so wear your “Friday night chill” attire.

    Your $20 investment includes fun business bingo, brunch bites (We eat brunch food anytime in the Lowcountry!), Klarity bag, and The Ultimate KKP Experience! There will also be giveaways! Only 15 spots available! For more information, contact Krystal Klear Productions at (843) 608-9416 or KrystalKlearProductions1@gmail.com. #TheEntrepreneurialKickback #KKPEntrepreneurialKickback #KKPKickback #TheBusinessBrunchEdition #TEKBusinessBrunch #KKPBusinessBrunch

  • Southbound: Photographs of and about the New South
    11:00 am-4:00 pm
    Oct-19-18-Mar-02-19

    161 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC

    161 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC

    Southbound: Photographs of and about the New South is an unprecedented photography exhibition co-curated by Mark Sloan, director and chief curator of the Halsey Institute of Contemporary Art, and Mark Long, professor of political science, both of whom are on the faculty of the College of Charleston, in South Carolina.

    Southbound embraces the conundrum of its name. To be southbound is to journey to a place in flux, radically transformed over recent decades, yet also to the place where the past resonates most insistently in the United States. To be southbound is also to confront the weight of preconceived notions about this place, thick with stereotypes, encoded in the artistic, literary, and media records. Southbound engages with and unsettles assumed narratives about this contested region by providing fresh perspectives for understanding the complex admixture of history, geography, and culture that constitutes today’s New South.

    Southbound will comprise fifty-six photographers’ visions of the South over the first decades of the twenty-first century. Accordingly, it offers a composite image of the region. The photographs echo stories told about the South as a bastion of tradition, as a region remade through Americanization and globalization, and as a land full of surprising realities. The project’s purpose is to investigate senses of place in the South that congeal, however fleetingly, in the spaces between the photographers’ looking, their images, and our own preexisting ideas about the region.

    Recognizing the complexity of understanding any place, let alone one as charged as the American South, the curators’ approach is transdisciplinary. The photographs will be complemented by a commissioned video, an interactive digital mapping environment, an extensive stand-alone website, and a comprehensive exhibition catalogue. This publication will draw on expertise from disciplines in the arts, humanities, and social sciences.

    The history of the American South is among the most storied of any region in the world. As a result of the vitality of its culture and the diversity of its inhabitants—to say nothing about the salience of photography in the U.S.—the region has also come to be among the most photographed. Through the exhibition, video, remappings, website, and catalogue—separately and in tandem—the Southbound project charts new courses to expanded imaginings for the twenty-first century South.

    Southbound is supported by the National Endowment for the Arts and the Robert Mapplethorpe Foundation. The exhibition will debut simultaneously at the Halsey Institute of Contemporary Art and the City Gallery at Waterfront Park.

  • OPENING RECEPTION | Southbound: Photographs of and about the New South
    6:30 pm-8:00 pm
    Oct-19-18

    161 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC

    161 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC

    Join us for the opening reception for Southbound: Photographs of and about the New South. Celebrate the exhibition at the Halsey Institute from 6:30-8:00 PM.


    The Halsey Institute of Contemporary Art is pleased to present the exhibition Southbound: Photographs of and about the New South, an unprecedented photography project co-curated by Mark Sloan, director and chief curator of the Halsey Institute of Contemporary Art, and Mark Long, professor of political science, both of whom are on the faculty of the College of Charleston, in South Carolina.

    The exhibition will be on view simultaneously at the Halsey Institute of Contemporary Art and the City Gallery at Waterfront Park. A brunch reception on Saturday, October 20 will celebrate the exhibition’s opening at the City Gallery.

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  • Southbound: Photographs of and about the New South
    11:00 am-4:00 pm
    Oct-21-18-Mar-04-19

    161 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC

    161 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC

    Southbound: Photographs of and about the New South is an unprecedented photography exhibition co-curated by Mark Sloan, director and chief curator of the Halsey Institute of Contemporary Art, and Mark Long, professor of political science, both of whom are on the faculty of the College of Charleston, in South Carolina.

    Southbound embraces the conundrum of its name. To be southbound is to journey to a place in flux, radically transformed over recent decades, yet also to the place where the past resonates most insistently in the United States. To be southbound is also to confront the weight of preconceived notions about this place, thick with stereotypes, encoded in the artistic, literary, and media records. Southbound engages with and unsettles assumed narratives about this contested region by providing fresh perspectives for understanding the complex admixture of history, geography, and culture that constitutes today’s New South.

    Southbound will comprise fifty-six photographers’ visions of the South over the first decades of the twenty-first century. Accordingly, it offers a composite image of the region. The photographs echo stories told about the South as a bastion of tradition, as a region remade through Americanization and globalization, and as a land full of surprising realities. The project’s purpose is to investigate senses of place in the South that congeal, however fleetingly, in the spaces between the photographers’ looking, their images, and our own preexisting ideas about the region.

    Recognizing the complexity of understanding any place, let alone one as charged as the American South, the curators’ approach is transdisciplinary. The photographs will be complemented by a commissioned video, an interactive digital mapping environment, an extensive stand-alone website, and a comprehensive exhibition catalogue. This publication will draw on expertise from disciplines in the arts, humanities, and social sciences.

    The history of the American South is among the most storied of any region in the world. As a result of the vitality of its culture and the diversity of its inhabitants—to say nothing about the salience of photography in the U.S.—the region has also come to be among the most photographed. Through the exhibition, video, remappings, website, and catalogue—separately and in tandem—the Southbound project charts new courses to expanded imaginings for the twenty-first century South.

    Southbound is supported by the National Endowment for the Arts and the Robert Mapplethorpe Foundation. The exhibition will debut simultaneously at the Halsey Institute of Contemporary Art and the City Gallery at Waterfront Park.

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  • Southbound: Photographs of and about the New South
    11:00 am-4:00 pm
    Oct-22-18-Mar-05-19

    161 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC

    161 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC

    Southbound: Photographs of and about the New South is an unprecedented photography exhibition co-curated by Mark Sloan, director and chief curator of the Halsey Institute of Contemporary Art, and Mark Long, professor of political science, both of whom are on the faculty of the College of Charleston, in South Carolina.

    Southbound embraces the conundrum of its name. To be southbound is to journey to a place in flux, radically transformed over recent decades, yet also to the place where the past resonates most insistently in the United States. To be southbound is also to confront the weight of preconceived notions about this place, thick with stereotypes, encoded in the artistic, literary, and media records. Southbound engages with and unsettles assumed narratives about this contested region by providing fresh perspectives for understanding the complex admixture of history, geography, and culture that constitutes today’s New South.

    Southbound will comprise fifty-six photographers’ visions of the South over the first decades of the twenty-first century. Accordingly, it offers a composite image of the region. The photographs echo stories told about the South as a bastion of tradition, as a region remade through Americanization and globalization, and as a land full of surprising realities. The project’s purpose is to investigate senses of place in the South that congeal, however fleetingly, in the spaces between the photographers’ looking, their images, and our own preexisting ideas about the region.

    Recognizing the complexity of understanding any place, let alone one as charged as the American South, the curators’ approach is transdisciplinary. The photographs will be complemented by a commissioned video, an interactive digital mapping environment, an extensive stand-alone website, and a comprehensive exhibition catalogue. This publication will draw on expertise from disciplines in the arts, humanities, and social sciences.

    The history of the American South is among the most storied of any region in the world. As a result of the vitality of its culture and the diversity of its inhabitants—to say nothing about the salience of photography in the U.S.—the region has also come to be among the most photographed. Through the exhibition, video, remappings, website, and catalogue—separately and in tandem—the Southbound project charts new courses to expanded imaginings for the twenty-first century South.

    Southbound is supported by the National Endowment for the Arts and the Robert Mapplethorpe Foundation. The exhibition will debut simultaneously at the Halsey Institute of Contemporary Art and the City Gallery at Waterfront Park.

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  • Southbound: Photographs of and about the New South
    11:00 am-4:00 pm
    Oct-23-18-Mar-06-19

    161 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC

    161 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC

    Southbound: Photographs of and about the New South is an unprecedented photography exhibition co-curated by Mark Sloan, director and chief curator of the Halsey Institute of Contemporary Art, and Mark Long, professor of political science, both of whom are on the faculty of the College of Charleston, in South Carolina.

    Southbound embraces the conundrum of its name. To be southbound is to journey to a place in flux, radically transformed over recent decades, yet also to the place where the past resonates most insistently in the United States. To be southbound is also to confront the weight of preconceived notions about this place, thick with stereotypes, encoded in the artistic, literary, and media records. Southbound engages with and unsettles assumed narratives about this contested region by providing fresh perspectives for understanding the complex admixture of history, geography, and culture that constitutes today’s New South.

    Southbound will comprise fifty-six photographers’ visions of the South over the first decades of the twenty-first century. Accordingly, it offers a composite image of the region. The photographs echo stories told about the South as a bastion of tradition, as a region remade through Americanization and globalization, and as a land full of surprising realities. The project’s purpose is to investigate senses of place in the South that congeal, however fleetingly, in the spaces between the photographers’ looking, their images, and our own preexisting ideas about the region.

    Recognizing the complexity of understanding any place, let alone one as charged as the American South, the curators’ approach is transdisciplinary. The photographs will be complemented by a commissioned video, an interactive digital mapping environment, an extensive stand-alone website, and a comprehensive exhibition catalogue. This publication will draw on expertise from disciplines in the arts, humanities, and social sciences.

    The history of the American South is among the most storied of any region in the world. As a result of the vitality of its culture and the diversity of its inhabitants—to say nothing about the salience of photography in the U.S.—the region has also come to be among the most photographed. Through the exhibition, video, remappings, website, and catalogue—separately and in tandem—the Southbound project charts new courses to expanded imaginings for the twenty-first century South.

    Southbound is supported by the National Endowment for the Arts and the Robert Mapplethorpe Foundation. The exhibition will debut simultaneously at the Halsey Institute of Contemporary Art and the City Gallery at Waterfront Park.

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  • Southbound: Photographs of and about the New South
    11:00 am-4:00 pm
    Oct-24-18-Mar-07-19

    161 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC

    161 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC

    Southbound: Photographs of and about the New South is an unprecedented photography exhibition co-curated by Mark Sloan, director and chief curator of the Halsey Institute of Contemporary Art, and Mark Long, professor of political science, both of whom are on the faculty of the College of Charleston, in South Carolina.

    Southbound embraces the conundrum of its name. To be southbound is to journey to a place in flux, radically transformed over recent decades, yet also to the place where the past resonates most insistently in the United States. To be southbound is also to confront the weight of preconceived notions about this place, thick with stereotypes, encoded in the artistic, literary, and media records. Southbound engages with and unsettles assumed narratives about this contested region by providing fresh perspectives for understanding the complex admixture of history, geography, and culture that constitutes today’s New South.

    Southbound will comprise fifty-six photographers’ visions of the South over the first decades of the twenty-first century. Accordingly, it offers a composite image of the region. The photographs echo stories told about the South as a bastion of tradition, as a region remade through Americanization and globalization, and as a land full of surprising realities. The project’s purpose is to investigate senses of place in the South that congeal, however fleetingly, in the spaces between the photographers’ looking, their images, and our own preexisting ideas about the region.

    Recognizing the complexity of understanding any place, let alone one as charged as the American South, the curators’ approach is transdisciplinary. The photographs will be complemented by a commissioned video, an interactive digital mapping environment, an extensive stand-alone website, and a comprehensive exhibition catalogue. This publication will draw on expertise from disciplines in the arts, humanities, and social sciences.

    The history of the American South is among the most storied of any region in the world. As a result of the vitality of its culture and the diversity of its inhabitants—to say nothing about the salience of photography in the U.S.—the region has also come to be among the most photographed. Through the exhibition, video, remappings, website, and catalogue—separately and in tandem—the Southbound project charts new courses to expanded imaginings for the twenty-first century South.

    Southbound is supported by the National Endowment for the Arts and the Robert Mapplethorpe Foundation. The exhibition will debut simultaneously at the Halsey Institute of Contemporary Art and the City Gallery at Waterfront Park.

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  • Southbound: Photographs of and about the New South
    11:00 am-4:00 pm
    Oct-25-18-Mar-08-19

    161 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC

    161 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC

    Southbound: Photographs of and about the New South is an unprecedented photography exhibition co-curated by Mark Sloan, director and chief curator of the Halsey Institute of Contemporary Art, and Mark Long, professor of political science, both of whom are on the faculty of the College of Charleston, in South Carolina.

    Southbound embraces the conundrum of its name. To be southbound is to journey to a place in flux, radically transformed over recent decades, yet also to the place where the past resonates most insistently in the United States. To be southbound is also to confront the weight of preconceived notions about this place, thick with stereotypes, encoded in the artistic, literary, and media records. Southbound engages with and unsettles assumed narratives about this contested region by providing fresh perspectives for understanding the complex admixture of history, geography, and culture that constitutes today’s New South.

    Southbound will comprise fifty-six photographers’ visions of the South over the first decades of the twenty-first century. Accordingly, it offers a composite image of the region. The photographs echo stories told about the South as a bastion of tradition, as a region remade through Americanization and globalization, and as a land full of surprising realities. The project’s purpose is to investigate senses of place in the South that congeal, however fleetingly, in the spaces between the photographers’ looking, their images, and our own preexisting ideas about the region.

    Recognizing the complexity of understanding any place, let alone one as charged as the American South, the curators’ approach is transdisciplinary. The photographs will be complemented by a commissioned video, an interactive digital mapping environment, an extensive stand-alone website, and a comprehensive exhibition catalogue. This publication will draw on expertise from disciplines in the arts, humanities, and social sciences.

    The history of the American South is among the most storied of any region in the world. As a result of the vitality of its culture and the diversity of its inhabitants—to say nothing about the salience of photography in the U.S.—the region has also come to be among the most photographed. Through the exhibition, video, remappings, website, and catalogue—separately and in tandem—the Southbound project charts new courses to expanded imaginings for the twenty-first century South.

    Southbound is supported by the National Endowment for the Arts and the Robert Mapplethorpe Foundation. The exhibition will debut simultaneously at the Halsey Institute of Contemporary Art and the City Gallery at Waterfront Park.

  • Light and Dark: A Little History of the Negative | Lecture by Geoffrey Batchen
    7:00 pm-8:00 pm
    Oct-25-18

    202 Calhoun Street

    202 Calhoun Street

    Join the Halsey Institute of Contemporary Art for a lecture by renowned photo-historian, Geoffrey Batchen.

    One of the distinctive characteristics of photography is that most analogue photographs are positive prints that have been made from a negative. Nevertheless, the negative is almost always regarded as a secondary entity in discussions of photography, if it is discussed at all. Looking at work by a range of practitioners, including William Henry Fox Talbot, Man Ray, Dorothea Lange, Richard Avedon and Andreas Gursky, this talk will offer a little history of the negative, tracing some of the ways that history complicates our understanding of the photograph.

    Geoffrey Batchen teaches art history at Victoria University of Wellington in New Zealand. His books include Burning with Desire: The Conception of Photography (1997); Each Wild Idea: Writing, Photography, History (2001); Forget Me Not: Photography and Remembrance (2004); William Henry Fox Talbot(2008); Suspending Time: Life, Photography, Death (2010); and Emanations: The Art of the Cameraless Photograph (2016). Batchen has also curated exhibitions for the Museu Nacional de Belas Artes in Rio de Janeiro; the Van Gogh Museum in Amsterdam; the National Media Museum in Bradford, UK; the International Center of Photography in New York; the Wallraf-Richartz-Museum in Cologne; the Izu Photo Museum in Shizuoka, Japan; the National Museum of Iceland in Reykjavik; the Adam Art Gallery in Wellington, NZ; the Govett-Brewster Art Gallery in New Plymouth, NZ; and the Centre for Contemporary Photography in Melbourne. After teaching for many years in the United States, most recently at the Graduate Center of the City University of New York, Batchen has returned to speak at an international symposium in that city about vernacular photography.

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  • Southbound: Photographs of and about the New South
    11:00 am-4:00 pm
    Oct-26-18-Mar-09-19

    161 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC

    161 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC

    Southbound: Photographs of and about the New South is an unprecedented photography exhibition co-curated by Mark Sloan, director and chief curator of the Halsey Institute of Contemporary Art, and Mark Long, professor of political science, both of whom are on the faculty of the College of Charleston, in South Carolina.

    Southbound embraces the conundrum of its name. To be southbound is to journey to a place in flux, radically transformed over recent decades, yet also to the place where the past resonates most insistently in the United States. To be southbound is also to confront the weight of preconceived notions about this place, thick with stereotypes, encoded in the artistic, literary, and media records. Southbound engages with and unsettles assumed narratives about this contested region by providing fresh perspectives for understanding the complex admixture of history, geography, and culture that constitutes today’s New South.

    Southbound will comprise fifty-six photographers’ visions of the South over the first decades of the twenty-first century. Accordingly, it offers a composite image of the region. The photographs echo stories told about the South as a bastion of tradition, as a region remade through Americanization and globalization, and as a land full of surprising realities. The project’s purpose is to investigate senses of place in the South that congeal, however fleetingly, in the spaces between the photographers’ looking, their images, and our own preexisting ideas about the region.

    Recognizing the complexity of understanding any place, let alone one as charged as the American South, the curators’ approach is transdisciplinary. The photographs will be complemented by a commissioned video, an interactive digital mapping environment, an extensive stand-alone website, and a comprehensive exhibition catalogue. This publication will draw on expertise from disciplines in the arts, humanities, and social sciences.

    The history of the American South is among the most storied of any region in the world. As a result of the vitality of its culture and the diversity of its inhabitants—to say nothing about the salience of photography in the U.S.—the region has also come to be among the most photographed. Through the exhibition, video, remappings, website, and catalogue—separately and in tandem—the Southbound project charts new courses to expanded imaginings for the twenty-first century South.

    Southbound is supported by the National Endowment for the Arts and the Robert Mapplethorpe Foundation. The exhibition will debut simultaneously at the Halsey Institute of Contemporary Art and the City Gallery at Waterfront Park.

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  • Southbound: Photographs of and about the New South
    11:00 am-4:00 pm
    Oct-27-18-Mar-10-19

    161 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC

    161 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC

    Southbound: Photographs of and about the New South is an unprecedented photography exhibition co-curated by Mark Sloan, director and chief curator of the Halsey Institute of Contemporary Art, and Mark Long, professor of political science, both of whom are on the faculty of the College of Charleston, in South Carolina.

    Southbound embraces the conundrum of its name. To be southbound is to journey to a place in flux, radically transformed over recent decades, yet also to the place where the past resonates most insistently in the United States. To be southbound is also to confront the weight of preconceived notions about this place, thick with stereotypes, encoded in the artistic, literary, and media records. Southbound engages with and unsettles assumed narratives about this contested region by providing fresh perspectives for understanding the complex admixture of history, geography, and culture that constitutes today’s New South.

    Southbound will comprise fifty-six photographers’ visions of the South over the first decades of the twenty-first century. Accordingly, it offers a composite image of the region. The photographs echo stories told about the South as a bastion of tradition, as a region remade through Americanization and globalization, and as a land full of surprising realities. The project’s purpose is to investigate senses of place in the South that congeal, however fleetingly, in the spaces between the photographers’ looking, their images, and our own preexisting ideas about the region.

    Recognizing the complexity of understanding any place, let alone one as charged as the American South, the curators’ approach is transdisciplinary. The photographs will be complemented by a commissioned video, an interactive digital mapping environment, an extensive stand-alone website, and a comprehensive exhibition catalogue. This publication will draw on expertise from disciplines in the arts, humanities, and social sciences.

    The history of the American South is among the most storied of any region in the world. As a result of the vitality of its culture and the diversity of its inhabitants—to say nothing about the salience of photography in the U.S.—the region has also come to be among the most photographed. Through the exhibition, video, remappings, website, and catalogue—separately and in tandem—the Southbound project charts new courses to expanded imaginings for the twenty-first century South.

    Southbound is supported by the National Endowment for the Arts and the Robert Mapplethorpe Foundation. The exhibition will debut simultaneously at the Halsey Institute of Contemporary Art and the City Gallery at Waterfront Park.

  • EKPHRASTIC SOUTHBOUND | Poetry Reading by USC Students
    2:00 pm-3:00 pm
    Oct-27-18

    34 Prioleau Street

    34 Prioleau Street

    Join the Halsey Institute of Contemporary Art for a reading by poetry students studying with Nikky Finney at the University of South Carolina. The group will read ekphrastic poems inspired by photographs included in the exhibition Southbound: Photographs of and about the New South.

    Nikky Finney, Professor of Creative Writing and Southern Letters at the University of South Carolina and 2011 winner of the National Book Award for Poetry, contributed four new poems to the Southbound catalogue. She will read her work in a separate event, An Evening with Nikky Finney, on February 12, 2019.

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  • Southbound: Photographs of and about the New South
    11:00 am-4:00 pm
    Oct-28-18-Mar-11-19

    161 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC

    161 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC

    Southbound: Photographs of and about the New South is an unprecedented photography exhibition co-curated by Mark Sloan, director and chief curator of the Halsey Institute of Contemporary Art, and Mark Long, professor of political science, both of whom are on the faculty of the College of Charleston, in South Carolina.

    Southbound embraces the conundrum of its name. To be southbound is to journey to a place in flux, radically transformed over recent decades, yet also to the place where the past resonates most insistently in the United States. To be southbound is also to confront the weight of preconceived notions about this place, thick with stereotypes, encoded in the artistic, literary, and media records. Southbound engages with and unsettles assumed narratives about this contested region by providing fresh perspectives for understanding the complex admixture of history, geography, and culture that constitutes today’s New South.

    Southbound will comprise fifty-six photographers’ visions of the South over the first decades of the twenty-first century. Accordingly, it offers a composite image of the region. The photographs echo stories told about the South as a bastion of tradition, as a region remade through Americanization and globalization, and as a land full of surprising realities. The project’s purpose is to investigate senses of place in the South that congeal, however fleetingly, in the spaces between the photographers’ looking, their images, and our own preexisting ideas about the region.

    Recognizing the complexity of understanding any place, let alone one as charged as the American South, the curators’ approach is transdisciplinary. The photographs will be complemented by a commissioned video, an interactive digital mapping environment, an extensive stand-alone website, and a comprehensive exhibition catalogue. This publication will draw on expertise from disciplines in the arts, humanities, and social sciences.

    The history of the American South is among the most storied of any region in the world. As a result of the vitality of its culture and the diversity of its inhabitants—to say nothing about the salience of photography in the U.S.—the region has also come to be among the most photographed. Through the exhibition, video, remappings, website, and catalogue—separately and in tandem—the Southbound project charts new courses to expanded imaginings for the twenty-first century South.

    Southbound is supported by the National Endowment for the Arts and the Robert Mapplethorpe Foundation. The exhibition will debut simultaneously at the Halsey Institute of Contemporary Art and the City Gallery at Waterfront Park.

29
  • Southbound: Photographs of and about the New South
    11:00 am-4:00 pm
    Oct-29-18-Mar-12-19

    161 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC

    161 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC

    Southbound: Photographs of and about the New South is an unprecedented photography exhibition co-curated by Mark Sloan, director and chief curator of the Halsey Institute of Contemporary Art, and Mark Long, professor of political science, both of whom are on the faculty of the College of Charleston, in South Carolina.

    Southbound embraces the conundrum of its name. To be southbound is to journey to a place in flux, radically transformed over recent decades, yet also to the place where the past resonates most insistently in the United States. To be southbound is also to confront the weight of preconceived notions about this place, thick with stereotypes, encoded in the artistic, literary, and media records. Southbound engages with and unsettles assumed narratives about this contested region by providing fresh perspectives for understanding the complex admixture of history, geography, and culture that constitutes today’s New South.

    Southbound will comprise fifty-six photographers’ visions of the South over the first decades of the twenty-first century. Accordingly, it offers a composite image of the region. The photographs echo stories told about the South as a bastion of tradition, as a region remade through Americanization and globalization, and as a land full of surprising realities. The project’s purpose is to investigate senses of place in the South that congeal, however fleetingly, in the spaces between the photographers’ looking, their images, and our own preexisting ideas about the region.

    Recognizing the complexity of understanding any place, let alone one as charged as the American South, the curators’ approach is transdisciplinary. The photographs will be complemented by a commissioned video, an interactive digital mapping environment, an extensive stand-alone website, and a comprehensive exhibition catalogue. This publication will draw on expertise from disciplines in the arts, humanities, and social sciences.

    The history of the American South is among the most storied of any region in the world. As a result of the vitality of its culture and the diversity of its inhabitants—to say nothing about the salience of photography in the U.S.—the region has also come to be among the most photographed. Through the exhibition, video, remappings, website, and catalogue—separately and in tandem—the Southbound project charts new courses to expanded imaginings for the twenty-first century South.

    Southbound is supported by the National Endowment for the Arts and the Robert Mapplethorpe Foundation. The exhibition will debut simultaneously at the Halsey Institute of Contemporary Art and the City Gallery at Waterfront Park.

30
  • Southbound: Photographs of and about the New South
    11:00 am-4:00 pm
    Oct-30-18-Mar-13-19

    161 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC

    161 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC

    Southbound: Photographs of and about the New South is an unprecedented photography exhibition co-curated by Mark Sloan, director and chief curator of the Halsey Institute of Contemporary Art, and Mark Long, professor of political science, both of whom are on the faculty of the College of Charleston, in South Carolina.

    Southbound embraces the conundrum of its name. To be southbound is to journey to a place in flux, radically transformed over recent decades, yet also to the place where the past resonates most insistently in the United States. To be southbound is also to confront the weight of preconceived notions about this place, thick with stereotypes, encoded in the artistic, literary, and media records. Southbound engages with and unsettles assumed narratives about this contested region by providing fresh perspectives for understanding the complex admixture of history, geography, and culture that constitutes today’s New South.

    Southbound will comprise fifty-six photographers’ visions of the South over the first decades of the twenty-first century. Accordingly, it offers a composite image of the region. The photographs echo stories told about the South as a bastion of tradition, as a region remade through Americanization and globalization, and as a land full of surprising realities. The project’s purpose is to investigate senses of place in the South that congeal, however fleetingly, in the spaces between the photographers’ looking, their images, and our own preexisting ideas about the region.

    Recognizing the complexity of understanding any place, let alone one as charged as the American South, the curators’ approach is transdisciplinary. The photographs will be complemented by a commissioned video, an interactive digital mapping environment, an extensive stand-alone website, and a comprehensive exhibition catalogue. This publication will draw on expertise from disciplines in the arts, humanities, and social sciences.

    The history of the American South is among the most storied of any region in the world. As a result of the vitality of its culture and the diversity of its inhabitants—to say nothing about the salience of photography in the U.S.—the region has also come to be among the most photographed. Through the exhibition, video, remappings, website, and catalogue—separately and in tandem—the Southbound project charts new courses to expanded imaginings for the twenty-first century South.

    Southbound is supported by the National Endowment for the Arts and the Robert Mapplethorpe Foundation. The exhibition will debut simultaneously at the Halsey Institute of Contemporary Art and the City Gallery at Waterfront Park.

31
  • Southbound: Photographs of and about the New South
    11:00 am-4:00 pm
    Oct-31-18-Mar-14-19

    161 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC

    161 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC

    Southbound: Photographs of and about the New South is an unprecedented photography exhibition co-curated by Mark Sloan, director and chief curator of the Halsey Institute of Contemporary Art, and Mark Long, professor of political science, both of whom are on the faculty of the College of Charleston, in South Carolina.

    Southbound embraces the conundrum of its name. To be southbound is to journey to a place in flux, radically transformed over recent decades, yet also to the place where the past resonates most insistently in the United States. To be southbound is also to confront the weight of preconceived notions about this place, thick with stereotypes, encoded in the artistic, literary, and media records. Southbound engages with and unsettles assumed narratives about this contested region by providing fresh perspectives for understanding the complex admixture of history, geography, and culture that constitutes today’s New South.

    Southbound will comprise fifty-six photographers’ visions of the South over the first decades of the twenty-first century. Accordingly, it offers a composite image of the region. The photographs echo stories told about the South as a bastion of tradition, as a region remade through Americanization and globalization, and as a land full of surprising realities. The project’s purpose is to investigate senses of place in the South that congeal, however fleetingly, in the spaces between the photographers’ looking, their images, and our own preexisting ideas about the region.

    Recognizing the complexity of understanding any place, let alone one as charged as the American South, the curators’ approach is transdisciplinary. The photographs will be complemented by a commissioned video, an interactive digital mapping environment, an extensive stand-alone website, and a comprehensive exhibition catalogue. This publication will draw on expertise from disciplines in the arts, humanities, and social sciences.

    The history of the American South is among the most storied of any region in the world. As a result of the vitality of its culture and the diversity of its inhabitants—to say nothing about the salience of photography in the U.S.—the region has also come to be among the most photographed. Through the exhibition, video, remappings, website, and catalogue—separately and in tandem—the Southbound project charts new courses to expanded imaginings for the twenty-first century South.

    Southbound is supported by the National Endowment for the Arts and the Robert Mapplethorpe Foundation. The exhibition will debut simultaneously at the Halsey Institute of Contemporary Art and the City Gallery at Waterfront Park.

November
November
November