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Black History News

Rachel Robinson, Hank Aaron, and Presidents Obama, Bush, Clinton & Carter Launch the Month-Long “Tip Your Cap” Campaign to Honor the 100th Anniversary of Baseball’s Negro Leagues

Presidents Barack Obama, George W. Bush, Bill Clinton and Jimmy Carter, in collaboration with civil rights hero Rachel Robinson and baseball legend Hank Aaron, are joined by scores of baseball players and other professional athletes, sports executives, entertainers, journalists and others for an unprecedented tribute to the 100-year anniversary of the founding of baseball’s Negro Leagues.  The Tip Your Cap campaign, which is being directed…

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Film review: John Lewis – Good Trouble

“I feel lucky and blessed that I’m serving in the Congress… But there is a force that is trying to take us back to another time and another dark period,” warns congressman John Lewis. And he’d know.   Since age 17, this brave crusader has been at the forefront of the civil rights movement. Now at…

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Secretary Bernhardt Designates John Hope Franklin Reconciliation Park as African American Civil Rights Network Site

U.S. Secretary of the Interior David L. Bernhardt has designated the John Hope Franklin Reconciliation Park as an official member of the African American Civil Rights Network (AACRN), formally recognizing the historical and national significance of the tragic Tulsa Race Massacre of 1921 and Dr. John Hope Franklin’s work to advance the African American civil rights movement. The African…

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NASA Names Headquarters After ‘Hidden Figure’ Mary W. Jackson

NASA Administrator Jim Bridenstine announced June 23 the agency’s headquarters building in Washington, D.C., will be named after Mary W. Jackson, the first African American female engineer at NASA. Jackson started her NASA career in the segregated West Area Computing Unit of the agency’s Langley Research Center in Hampton, Virginia. Jackson, a mathematician and aerospace engineer, went on to lead programs…

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Struggle Seen in Belgium Over Racist Historical Statues

Some of the largest anti-racism protests in Europe have taken place in Belgium, the birthplace of King Léopold II, whose brutal rule of Congo from 1885 to 1908 caused an estimated 10 million Congolese deaths through murder, starvation and disease. This past week, close to 12,000 people gathered in central Brussels. They were targeting the…

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Historic Greenwood Chamber of Commerce Launches National Campaign to Restore the Original Black Wall Street

The Historic Greenwood Chamber of Commerce announced during a June 18 press conference they are launching a campaign to raise funds to restore Black Wall Street, a once affluent black community. In the early 20th Century, Tulsa, Oklahoma was home to one of the most affluent black business districts in the United States. Black Wall Street had approximately 600 businesses,…

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Mother Emanuel’s Legacy of Hope Five Years Later

By Alicia Lutz Five years ago, on June 17, 2015, the Holy City was forever changed. What started with a Bible study in the basement of Emanuel African Methodist Episcopal (AME) Church on Calhoun Street in downtown Charleston, South Carolina, became the scene of mass murder at the hands of a racist. Nine members of…

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