Documentary

Film review: There’s Something in the Water

They’re making a lot of noise up in Nova Scotia. Local activists of African and Native American descent are holding big businesses and the government accountable for polluting their water and causing an uptick in cancer cases. They’re sounding the alarm and applying pressure. The surprising but very worthy champion of their efforts to expose environmental racism is actress…

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The League of Women Voters of the Charleston Area host documentary film premiere screening and panel discussion

As the 2020 vote approaches, Americans’ understanding of election laws and their intricacies gains greater importance. Uncivil War: U.S. Elections Under Siege, a new documentary from the Bertelsmann Foundation, paints the picture of three different (and legal) ways to undermine an election in the United States: gerrymandering, voter suppression, and disinformation. The film unravels a…

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‘Rondo: Beyond the Pavement’ shines a light on the intentional destruction of a thriving Black community

By Josh Cobb, Twin Cities Association of Black Journalists /Insight News Intern In the early to mid-20th century, Minnesota’s state capital was the epicenter of a thriving, local Black community; the Rondo neighborhood. It was an essential gathering place, as it was home to businesses, political organizations such as the Urban League and the National…

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Science Channel To Premiere Two-Hour Special ‘Lost Kingdom Of The Black Pharaohs’ December 1

A late dynasty of Ancient Egypt that ruled for 100 years beginning in 744 B.C was led by pharaohs including Piye, Shabaqo, and Taharqa, who won battles, powered the last great pyramid building boom, and gave the Egyptian empire its final golden age. Many scholars believed that these powerful pharaohs were black, but outdated stereotyping…

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‘Pushout: The Criminalization of Black Girls in Schools’

By Stacy M. Brown, NNPA Newswire Correspondent @StacyBrownMedia Black girls who have been subject to punitive school policies and practices are at an increased risk of coming into contact with the juvenile and criminal courts and leaving school altogether, ultimately impeding their ability to achieve future success and lead successful and healthy lives, according to…

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“Miles Davis: Birth of the Cool” Review

So many legendary jazz musicians are gone. Victims of father time. And as they pass, a bit of history does too. When enlightening documentaries revive their memories, we get a do over. For a brief moment, we can appreciate them and their eras, all over again.  Director Stanley Nelson is a gifted archivist who recreates…

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Ava DuVernay’s “When They See Us” Wins Mass Attention for Focus on Falsely Accused Central Park Five

By Lauren Victoria Burke, NNPA Newswire Contributor The painful true stories of five falsely accused young men, Yusef Salaam, Raymond Santana, Kevin Richardson, Antron McCray, and Korey Wise, has been brought to light in excruciatingly vivid detail by director Ava DuVernay. The group known as the Central Park Five would receive 6 to 13 years…

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Historic Black Myrtle Beach nightclub documentary “Charlie’s Place” wins Emmy award

The National Academy of Television Arts and Sciences Southeast chapter on Saturday held the 45th Annual Southeast Emmy Awards ceremony in Buckhead, Ga. At the event, South Carolina Educational Television (SCETV) received an Emmy award for Best Historical/Cultural – Program for “Charlie’s Place.” Part of the network’s “Carolina Stories” series, “Charlie’s Place” tells the story…

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