Avery Research Center Announces Black History Bugle Edwin Harleston Creative Arts Competition

The Avery Research Center for African American History and Culture at the College of Charleston will be holding the Edwin Harleston Creative Arts competition in honor of black history month. The contest is open to all students in Charleston County school district, grades K-5.

Edwin Harleston was a graduate of the Avery Institute class of 1900 who went on to found Charleston’s first local NAACP chapter which was held at the Avery. Aside from being a prominent activist, Harleston was also a committed artist who painted many portraits, some of which are now held at the Avery Research Center.

In order to participate in the contest, students will be asked select one black historical figure and highlight the following in their submission:

     ● Background information on the historical figure of their choosing (Must use at least 1 primary resource)

     ● A summary of their contributions to South Carolina and abroad

     ● Why is their work significant?

     ● How does their work affect lives on a present day?

     ● Why did the person they selected inspire them?

Contest categories include:

     ● 250-500 word essay

     ● 2-3 minute video

     ● Artwork Piece

The deadline for this competition will be February 22, 2020. Email submissions to [email protected]

What Is the South Carolina Black History Bugle?

The Black History Bugle is a print and multimedia online educational resource dedicated to illuminating South Carolina Black History in an interactive way. Carefully conceived by the team at the College of Charleston’s Avery Research Center, the Bugle uses primary sources to make learning Social Studies historically accurate and student-friendly. In particular, the website allows educators and students to explore African American history together with group activities, student led work, and learning modules to correspond with classroom curricula.

Why a Contest Centered on Creativity?

Black innovation has contributed a great amount to the South Carolina, the United States, and the world. In an effort to continue highlighting such creativity, we want to give students the opportunity to showcase their love and appreciation of South Carolina African American history in a unique, expressive way. Appealing to all learning styles, this year’s contest will allow students to express their knowledge in ways that will not only help them sustain such information, but also serve as a resource for their fellow classmates.

Contest Criteria:

Students will be asked to select one black historical figure and highlight the following in their submission:

     ● Background information on the historical figure of their choosing (must use at least one primary resource)

     ● A summary of their contributions to South Carolina and abroad

     ● Why is their work significant

     ● How does their work lives on in the present day

     ● How does the person they selected inspire them

Eligibility:

     ● Must be a student Grades K-12 in Charleston County

Black History Creativity Contest Categories:

     ● 250- 500 word essay

     ● 2-5 minute video

     ● Artwork Piece

Selected winner’s work will be published on http://www.blackhistorybugle.org/.

Submission Deadline

     ● February 26, 2020

SC State Standards and Indicators:

Kindergarten

     ● K.H.1 Identify similarities and differences between oneself and others. This indicator was developed to encourage inquiry into students’ individual characteristics in relation to those of their classmates.

     ● K.CG.1 Identify similarities and differences between people and discuss ways to protect and respect all people by practicing civic dispositions. This indicator was developed to encourage inquiry into diversity within the classroom and community. Further, inquiry promotes identifying civic dispositions (e.g., compassion, cooperation, empathy, honesty, and respect) that are already exhibited in the classroom setting and can be used for problem solving in the future.

First Grade

     ● 1.H.1 Identify similarities and differences between one’s community and other South Carolina communities over time. This indicator was developed to encourage inquiry into the defining characteristics of a students’ own community. Further, inquiry should include the finding of similarities and differences among communities throughout South Carolina to build comparison skills for historical inquiry

     ● 1.CG.1 Demonstrate how civic dispositions encourage citizens with diverse beliefs and backgrounds to work together for a common goal. This indicator was developed to encourage inquiry into working with others with stories different from their own. This indicator was also developed to encourage inquiry into the identification of examples of this behavior that are already occurring and how to use civic dispositions to better accomplish a task.

Second Grade

     ● 2.H.1 Identify and compare significant historical events, moments, and symbols in U.S. history. This indicator was developed to encourage inquiry into historical events, including figures, symbols, and observances, that have been important to the U.S. over time as well as how they impact us.

     ● 2.H.2 Examine current or past events from U.S. history, and discuss the possible causes and effects. This indicator was developed to encourage inquiry into multiple causes and effects of events in U.S. history. This indicator also promotes inquiry into how to practice appropriate group discussion and civic dispositions, especially related to citizens’ roles in current events.

     ●2.CG.1 Identify cultural and ethnic groups in the U. S., explore their characteristics, and communicate how civic dispositions build relationships between groups in a diverse society. This indicator was developed to encourage inquiry into how civic dispositions (i.e., compassion, cooperation, empathy, honesty, and respect) support cooperation within a diverse society

     ● 2.CG.2 Use primary and secondary sources to research a national figure who demonstrated civic dispositions. This indicator was developed to encourage inquiry into past and present national figures who demonstrated civic dispositions (i.e., compassion, cooperation, empathy, honesty, and respect) by exploring a variety of sources, such as children’s literature, historic documents, photographs and images, or news sources.

Third Grade

     ● 3.4.1.PR Investigate the cultural characteristics of places and regions around the world. This indicator prompts students to inquire about how geography influences cultural characteristics around the world. Culture may be expressed by architecture, arts and literature, clothing, cuisine, language, and religion, among other items.

     ● S Investigate and explain the economic, social, political, and environmental motivations behind human migration and how places can change as a result. This indicator prompts students to examine why humans have decided to migrate – voluntarily or involuntarily – to different world regions, including reasons related to work opportunities, social or political persecution, and changing environmental conditions.

Fourth Grade

     ● 4.1.CX Contextualize the experience of Africans, Europeans, and Native Americans in South Carolina. This indicator was developed to promote inquiry into how South Carolina developed as a result of the relationship among various ethnic, political, and religious groups.

     ● 4.4.P Explain how emancipation was achieved as a result of civic participation. This indicator was developed to prompt inquiry into the role abolitionists played in influencing public opinion and urging policymakers to protect natural rights, which led to emancipation.

     ● 4.5.CC Identify and evaluate the impact of economic, political, and social events on the African American experience throughout Reconstruction. This indicator was developed to encourage inquiry into how Reconstruction resulted in the foundation for the struggle for civil rights. This indicator was also developed to foster inquiry into Reconstruction Era policies such as Constitutional amendments, black codes, and Jim Crow Laws.

Fifth Grade

     ● 5.1.CE Examine push- and pull-factors related to immigration and expansion on urban and rural populations during the period. This indicator was developed to promote inquiry into why and how various peoples immigrated to the U.S. Furthermore, this indicator was designed to promote inquiry into how these immigrant cultures influenced American culture and society

     ● 5.1.CC Summarize how imperialism and economic expansion impacted the experiences of different groups and shaped American cultural identities. This indicator was developed to promote inquiry into how the economy of the United States grew during the time period. Topics for inquiry may include the impact of population growth on production, working conditions, and the subsequent labor movements to 1910.

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