Tamara C. Curry Makes History Becoming First African-American To Lead National Organization

By Kurt Walker

The National College of Probate Judges (NCPJ) recently inducted Charleston County Probate Court associate judge the Honorable Tamara C. Curry as its president at the organization’s fall conference in Ponte Vedra, Florida on November 17, 2017.  Curry is the first African-American president of NCPJ, which was founded in 1968 to improve the administration of justice in courts with jurisdiction over descendents’ estates, guardianships and trusts.  According to the NCPJ website, it is the only national organization exclusively dedicated to improving probate law and probate courts.

Curry is a graduate of South Carolina State University, where she earned a Bachelor of Arts Degree in Political Science.  She then enrolled in the College of Law at the University of Tennessee and received her Doctorate in 1988. Curry was admitted to practice law in Ohio in 1988 and South Carolina in 1992.

Tamara C. Curry being sworn-in by Rita Cobb as the new president of The National College of Probate Judges(NCPJ). Cobb is the former president.

Attorney and Municipal Judge for the City of North Charleston Thad Doughty discussed the impact of Curry’s new role.  “I think it’s significant because it shows she was selected for her leadership skills and ability and also shows that major organizations are looking at individuals with different backgrounds to lead their organization.  They made an excellent choice and Curry will be outstanding leader,” stated Doughty.

Locally, Curry began her career as a part of The Curry Law Firm where she worked alongside her husband Reverend Eduardo Curry prior to be appointed Associate Probate Judge for Charleston County in 1998. Judge Curry also presides a judge of the Charleston County Adult Drug Court. She would later start the first Mental Health court in the state.  In 2010, Curry was appointed to serve as a presiding judge for the Charleston County Juvenile Drug Court.

Curry succeeds the Honorable Rita Cobb, who served the Washington County Circuit Court of Oregon.

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