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Studies Show Improved Sickle Cell Disease Outcomes Worldwide

At the 60th American Society of Hematology (ASH) Annual Meeting and Exposition in San Diego, researchers announce findings from four studies that could greatly expand access to both curative and supportive treatments for individuals living with sickle cell disease (SCD) worldwide. The results of two first-in-human trials suggest promising initial results for ground-breaking approaches to…

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African Activists Demand Action Now at World Climate Confab in Poland

Dorothy Nalubega was far from home but close enough to the U.N. climate summit in Katowice, Poland, to give the 200 world delegates in attendance an earful of her views on climate change. Nalubega was among thousands of protestors at the climate conference – the third such meeting since nations adopted the Paris climate agreement…

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South African Anti-Apartheid Veteran Tapped For Top Poetry Prize

A grand old man of liberation poetry, Mongane Wally Serote, the poet of the revolution and one of the foremost South African poets to emerge during the Black renaissance of the late 1960s and early 1970, is this year’s National Poet Laureate of South Africa. Writing in the African tradition of izibongo, or praise poetry,…

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Global Citizen Fest Honors Mandela Legacy Amidst Huge Crowd Of Beyoncé Fans

A massive turnout of die-hard fans of superstars Beyoncé and her husband Jay-Z filled every available square inch of the Johannesburg FNB stadium for the closing night of the Global Citizen Festival organized to honor the 100th anniversary of the birth of Nelson Mandela and raise $1 billion to address poverty, food security, global health…

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Africa Seeks Commitments To Fight Climate Threat At World Climate Confab

Seyni Nafo, spokesman of the African delegation at the World Climate Conference taking place this week in Poland, is not one to mince words about the serious climate threat now facing the African continent. “We are the most vulnerable, we are the least responsible but we will suffer the most,” the Malian-born Nafo summed up…

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Oil Trial Forces New Security of Nigerian Billions Swiped in Massive Fraud

It’s been called one of the biggest corruption cases in corporate history which has escaped the attention of much of the media and few have even heard about it. In the drama, playing out in an Italian court, two middlemen have been convicted for their role in the scheme involving one of Africa’s most promising…

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‘Right Livelihood’ Awards To Visionary Global Citizens Announced

The laureates of the 2018 Right Livelihood Award, widely known as the ‘Alternative Nobel Prize’, will receive their prizes at this week’s award presentation in Stockholm, Sweden. Regrettably, three Saudi laureates were prevented from attending due to lengthy prison sentences for their work promoting justice and equality. The awards recognize the outstanding contributions of global…

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FILM REVIEW: British Director Anyiam-Osigwe Strikes a Nerve with No Shade

By Barrington M. Salmon, NNPA NewswireContributing Writer Clare Anyiam-Osigwe, a first-time director, is enjoying the type of success usually reserved for veteran filmmakers. Her film debut, ‘No Shade’ is a witty, wry romantic story that shines a bright light on the troubling issue of colorism. Anyiam-Osigwe, a Nigerian-British entrepreneur and an emerging talent in the…

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East Africans Score Victory For Minneapolis’ Amazon Workers

Somali women packers for the giant Amazon distribution center in Minneapolis are fired up and refusing to speed up the production line, becoming the first known group to defy Amazon management and bring them to the bargaining table. “Nobody would assume a Muslim worker with limited language skills in the middle of Minnesota could be…

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Kenyan Grassroots Activist Tapped For Major Humanitarian Prize

Kennedy Odede started SHOFCO (Shining Hope for Communities) as a teenager in 2004 with 20 cents and a soccer ball. Growing up in Kibera, one of the largest slums in Africa, he experienced extreme poverty, violence, lack of opportunity, and deep gender inequality. Odede also dreamed of transforming urban slums, from the inside out. SHOFCO,…

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“Green Book” – Not Our Story; His-Story, Their Fiction

By Dr. Wilmer J. Leon, III (TriceEdneyWire.com) – “The greatest struggle of any oppressed group in a racist society is the struggle to reclaim collective memory and identity. At the level of culture, racism seeks to deny people of African, American Indian, Asian and Latino descent their own voices, histories and traditions. From the vantage-point…

White churches have a moral responsibility to stand up

By Rev. Jesse Jackson In 2019, we will commemorate 400 years since the first 20 slaves were transported by ship from Africa by white slave traders and landed in Jamestown, Va. Now four centuries later, race remains a central dividing line. Today, for example, the racial wealth gap exposes a stark difference. The median wealth…

It’s Time for a Focus on Economics

By A. Peter Bailey (TriceEdneyWire.com) – Now that the midterm elections are over, it’s time, once again, to alert Black folks to the peril and stupidity of putting nearly all of our time, energy and resources into electoral politics. If we spent at least half of that time, energy and especially resources into maximizing our…

Studying Black Identity in South Africa Transformed My Worldview

By Chiagoziem “Sylvester” Agu, Albany State University Of the more than 330,000 U.S. students studying abroad, only 6.1 percent are African American and 10 percent are Latino. This is one in a series of articles by students of color who are breaking down barriers by studying abroad thanks to the Frederick Douglass Global Fellowship, which awards…

Rev. Barbara Skinner and Intergenerational Leadership

By Julianne Malveaux (TriceEdneyWire.com) – Barbara Williams Skinner, at 75, looks at least two decades younger than her birth certificate suggests. Much of her youthful energy is due to her discipline, which includes a mindful prayer practice, a vegetarian diet, and a focused mind. But as much of her youthfulness, I think, can be attributed…

Early Voting and Expanded Absentee Voting are Key to Fair Elections

By Marc H. Morial (TriceEdneyWire.com) – “Georgia elections officials deployed a known strategy of voter suppression: closing and relocating polling places. Despite projections of record turnout, elections officials closed or moved approximately 305 locations, many in neighborhoods with numerous voters of color. Fewer polling places meant that the remaining locations strained to accommodate an influx…

Education: You Can’t Catch A Car With A Bike

By Beverly Gadson-Birch According to the State Department of Education Comprehensive Support and Improvement’s (CSI) recently released report, Charleston County School District has nine schools on the list: Greg Mathis Charter High, Morningside Middle, North Charleston Elementary, Chicora Elementary, Mary Ford Elementary, Burns Elementary, R.B. Stall High School, North Charleston High and St. John’s High…

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Preparing For The Gray Tsunami

By Barney Blakeney It was good getting the call from Mrs. Delaris Risher, former C.A. Brown High teacher and widow of the late Burke High and Charleston Rec. Dept. icon, Modie Risher. A fascinating and dedicated woman, Mrs. Risher is one of those women when in her presence, no matter how wild and crazy a…

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Success is an Opportunity Worth Exploring

By Hakim Abdul-Ali I come in contact with many diverse sectors of the so-called American People everyday and, as such, I’m always amazed at how many of them look at their respective lives. Recently, I had the good fortune to experience that firsthand and upfront. On this past Sunday, I was confronted by a young…

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Domestic Violence – A Serious Matter

By Beverly Gadson-Birch I wrote an article several years ago that caught an inmate’s attention while serving time in prison for spousal abuse and rape. His name was David and had served time in the military. He thanked me for doing the article and in his own words said, “You taught me what I was…

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Fearful Birthday To Me

By Barney Blakeney I just celebrated another birthday – turned 66 November 24. Never in any stretch of my imagination did I ever conceive of being 66. What’s it they say – youth is wasted on the young? I don’t know how true that may be, but as a young man I never thought of…

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Questioning and Being Who You Are

By Hakim Abdul-Ali For today’s article, I’m going to address some grown folk ethnological issues that I feel needs to be discussed about how some of us in “hue-manity” view ourselves and others. So, please take this occasion to read what I’m putting forth with a little bit more than a grain’s worth of formality…

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Beef With Bobby Seale Over Pork

By D.R.E James  Emcee and fellow 910 native J. Cole had a song on his 2014 album Born Sinner called “Let Nas Down,” lamenting about how he felt the pressures of his label for a radio single and deviated from his conscious, Ginsu-sharp, mile-deep brand of hip hop that purists like myself championed him for. This…

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Transit Enabled Community That Works For North Charleston

A rising cost of housing which outstrips local wages and the declining quantity and quality of public transit has created a crisis for people living and working in the Charleston area. Hard working people whose skills are essential to our economy now live lives shredded by distance and long, slow commutes. Their capacity to contribute…

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Shop Local This Season

By Rhea Landholm, Center for Rural Affairs This holiday season, will you be among 83 percent of consumers who plan to do some portion of their holiday shopping at a small, independently owned retailer or restaurant? These types of businesses are what keep our small communities thriving. Up and down rural main streets, shopkeepers are…

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Domestic Violence and Domestic Abuse: The Silent Epidemic

By Linda Lucas, Charleston youth and education advocate Physical abuse and domestic violence have become all too common or “normalized” in today’s society. According to national statistics, every minute, twenty people become the victims of intimate partner violence or domestic violence. A woman is beaten every nine seconds in the United States. We have moved…

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From the Sea to the Table: Episode 1 - Ray DeeZy links up with Chef George in North Charleston to learn about Gullah Cuisine, while making friend cabbage, rice, shrimp, and clams