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Nigeria To Slash Funds For Essential Food Imports While Currency Crisis Looms

Hard to imagine a steaming plate of Nigerian jollof rice without the rice. Or without fish. Or wheat. Rice, fish and wheat are Nigeria’s top three food imports but foreign exchange for these staple food imports is about to end by order of President Muhammadu Buhari. Presidential spokesman Garba Shehu said Tuesday the move to…

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In Tunisia, An Openly Gay Lawyer Breaks Barriers To Run For President

In a first for Tunisia’s fledgling democracy, an openly gay candidate has thrown his hat in the ring in the race for the presidency. Mounir Baatour, a lawyer at Tunisia’s highest court, heads Shams, the country’s main LGBTQ rights group fighting for the decriminalization of homosexuality in the country. His bid for office is a…

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Zimbabweans ‘Reduced To Paupers’ Since Mugabe’s Departure

It’s hard to believe how far Zimbabwe has fallen since former President Robert Mugabe was ousted in a military-backed coup. Power cuts now leave citizens without electricity from dawn to long after dusk. Gas is too expensive so families cook on firewood. Bread is unaffordable. Drought has caused failed harvests. And rising inflation has eaten…

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He Named His Movement ‘Revolution Now’ And They Jailed Him

Omoyele Sowore, activist, founder of the anti-corruption news service “Sahara Reporters” and former presidential candidate, was not surprised when the Nigerian Security Service (DSS) forcibly entered his house early Saturday morning and arrested him. His crime? Organizing a protest against bad governance in Nigeria. The DSS arrived Aug. 3 with four trucks, seizing his phones…

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Uganda Jails Feminist Critic For ‘Cyberharassment’ Of President On Facebook

A prominent university lecturer, poet and gender rights activist has been ordered to serve nine more months in prison for the crime of criticizing President Yoweri Museveni on Facebook. The sentence outraged rights activists. Joan Nyanyuki, director for East Africa at Amnesty International said: “This verdict flies in the face of Uganda’s obligations to uphold…

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Ilhan Omar Checks Out Ghana On A ‘Back To Africa’ Tour

Chants of “Send her back!” seemed to have little impact on the firm-footed Congresswoman Ilhan Omar, one of the four young women of color in the crosshairs of the embattled U.S. president. It may have been his chant but it was her idea to join the Congressional Black Caucus and visit Ghana on the occasion…

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Nigerian Claims To Defeating Boko Haram Are ‘Far From True Reality’

In Borno State, one of Nigeria’s most conflicted states in the Northeast, few would be celebrating the anniversary of the first outbreak of violence by the Boko Haram fighters whose trail of heartbreak and tragedy weave through the region’s many small towns. It might have seemed foolhardy for a small village to take on the…

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South African Miners Win Compensation For Work-Related Lung Diseases

A Johannesburg High Court on Friday approved a groundbreaking 5 billion rand ($353 million) class action settlement on behalf of miners who contracted tuberculosis, silicosis and other chronic lung diseases through their work in the mines. The settlement follows a long legal battle by miners to be compensated for illnesses they say they contracted over…

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Tunisia Pays Tribute To Fallen Leader

Tunisians paid tribute this week to former President Beji Caid Essebsi who made his mark on the world stage by advancing the cause of women’s rights. Tunisia has granted women more rights than any other country in the region. Since 2017, it has allowed Tunisian Muslim women to marry non-Muslim men. The former leader played…

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Kenyan ‘Greens’ Win Coal Plant Freeze In World Heritage Site

Kenyan environmentalists are cheering a major victory against a proposed coal-fired plant near the coastal town of Lamu, a UNESCO World Heritage Site. The win capped a three year fight against a well-funded effort by a Chinese-Kenyan consortium to build a 1,000 watt power plant on Kenya’s unspoiled northern coast. Save Lamu, a local activist…

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America’s Racial Wealth Gap Could Cost Economy $1.5 Trillion

By Charlene Crowell America’s nagging racial wealth gap has been the focus of many research reports and economic policy debates. Now new research analyzes the strong connection between disproportionate wealth and financial services and products that are either shared or denied with consumers of color. Authored by the McKinsey Global Institute (MGI), The economic impact of closing…

Mental Health Awareness Matters

By Cierra Mayes, Texas Metro News Writer With so much going on in the world today, there are many real-world issues that are in need of our focus. One of these issues happens in our everyday lives: mental health. There is so much awareness that needs to be brought to mental health that goes unnoticed.…

Celebrating Shirley Chisholm

By E. Faye Williams (TriceEdneywire.com) – It’s been 50 years since Shirley Chisholm was elected to the U.S. Congress and took Washington, DC by storm. A lot of men didn’t know quite what to do with her. She was the first Black Congresswoman and she made such a splash that many women were listening and…

Pediatricians Say Racism is Devastating to Black Children – Let’s Get to the Root Cause

By Enola Aird, Esq., Founder & President, Community Healing Network It’s amazing how often the news media give big play to an academic report that tells us something Black mothers already knew. Another example of the old wisdom nothing is real until White people discover or acknowledge it. Does that seem harsh? Consider the splashy…

Toni Morrison’s Passing is a Loss for the Racial Justice Community As Well As the Literary World

By Marc H. Morial (TriceEdneyWire.com) – “Oppressive language does more than represent violence; it is violence; does more than represent the limits of knowledge; it limits knowledge. Whether it is obscuring state language or the faux-language of mindless media; whether it is the proud but calcified language of the academy or the commodity driven language of…

Why I’m Visiting the Border

By Derrick Johnson, NAACP President and CEO As I ventured to the southern border near Laredo, Texas, I could not help but think about the tragic shootings in El Paso and Dayton, which are stark reminders of the dangers that plague our communities under the resurgence of white nationalism, domestic terrorism, intolerance and racial hatred…

What’s (Really) Going On?

By Hakim Abdul-Ali It’s almost the end of the summer season and the world is going through all kinds of perturbing chaotic and anarchist directions. And in the good old USA, from the monotonous and truly tedious “poly-tricks” of boring candidates running for elective offices to openly racist cries of bigoted nationalism gone  amuck, we…

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Don’t Be Fooled By Green Grass – There Still Is A Need For Rural Missions

By Barney Blakeney I learned some time ago Rural Missions, Inc. on Johns Island was closing. Last week I learned it closed May 31. A lot of people likely don’t understand the role Rural Missions, Inc. played in our community. Unfortunately, too many people don’t even know it existed! That’s a sad commentary. I learned…

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Something That’s Worth More Than Money

By Hakim Abdul-Ali I had the opportunity to talk to a young Euro-American soul the other day. It was an absolute delight to listen to and to have spoken with him because he was fresh out of prison. This young man, all of twenty-three-years of age, humbled me because I saw that he had possessed…

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Biking In Charleston Is Deadly, Riders Can Use Some Help

By Barney Blakeney The police reports of traffic fatalities involving bicyclists have been alarming. Local police public information officers send the reports regularly, but it took awhile for me to recognize a trend. I guess that’s why it’s so important for reporters to be as objective as humanly possible. As a regular peninsula driver, cyclers…

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Talk to the Hand, Mr. President

By Beverly Gadson-Birch I have been telling y’all all along that we have a serious problem with racism in America and it accelerated once #45, President Trump, took office. President Trump ran on “Make America Great Again.” If you didn’t catch the meaning of Trump’s slogan, in the beginning, and you are still in “la, la” land,…

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Life’s Realities, Certainties and Destinies

By Hakim Abdul-Ali It’s been said throughout the ages that time waits for no one which is an absolute, indisputable reality. And as sure as the sun does shine and night falls, we all will be tested in the living experience with one thing or the other. These are the definitive destinies of the twin…

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Black Women in South Carolina Deserve Equal Pay

By Elected Black Women, SC General Assembly Today, August 22, marks Black Women’s Equal Pay Day. Far from a celebration, this day represents how far Black women nationwide had to work into 2019 to match what white, non-Hispanic men earned in 2018. Nationally, Black women working full-time, year-round earned 61 cents for every dollar earned…

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Benny Starr Hosts Mo’ Better Brunch at Blue Note Bistro

My fondest childhood memories growing up in rural Berkeley County, South Carolina are filled with music. I recall the soulful voices of Whitney, Otis, Michael—Shirley Caesar, all leaping from my mother’s stereo and into my mind’s eye. These voices held a majestic quality and sounded as if they came from someplace far off. On Saturdays,…

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African Americans Saved Cadillac

At the turn of the 20th century, the automobile entered the American scene. During that period there was a proliferation of car manufacturers. In 1903 alone 57 companies came into existence and 27 went bankrupt. Over the years numerous models were introduced that are now a distant memory. Studebaker and Hudson come to mind. But the Cadillac, introduced in…

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A political lesson Political candidates need new strategy to attract Black voters

By Nate Abraham, Jr., Carolina Panorama Publisher The presidential campaigns have hit South Carolina like a hurricane. Presidential candidates seem to be everywhere, playing “Let’s Make A Deal” with potential voters and trying to line up endorsements from preachers to politicians. This outdated idea is based on the misguided premise that Black folks have “leaders” and…

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Carolina Stories: "Charlie’s Place" tells the story of an African American nightclub in Myrtle Beach that was a significant stop on the Chitlin’ Circuit in the segregated South