Follow The Chronicle On Twitter

Red Card For Portugal Over Racist Abuse Of Malian Soccer Star

Racism is rife in international soccer, with fans taking physical and verbal aim at players of the opposing team. After the routine apologies of the coaches and local officials, what has really been done to end the frequent racist outbursts, often accompanied by flying chairs or banana peels? This week, star striker Moussa Marega of…

Read More

Uganda’s Queen Of Katwe Star Dies After Diagnosis Of Brain Cancer

Nikita Pearl Waligwa, who starred as the friend of chess prodigy Phiona Mutesi in the Disney film “The Queen of Katwe,” passed away this week after a valiant struggle with cancer. She was 15 years of age. The film, which starred David Oyelowo as the chess teacher, Lupita Nyong’o as Phiona’s mother, and Madina Nmwanta…

Read More

In Break With History, Malawi Court Tosses Fraud-Riddled Elections

Following an exhaustive review of petitions submitted by the opposition, judges of the Malawian Constitutional Court ruled against Peter Mutharika whose presidential victory last May was attributed to massive fraud. Veteran diplomat Vernon Mwaanga of neighboring Zambia said the Court raised the bar for African countries where elections are plagued by irregularities. “The Malawi judicial…

Read More

At African Union Summit, Ramaphosa Announces End Of Colonialism

A stirring call to action was delivered this week in the august hall of the African Union headquarters in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia, spoken by the incoming AU president Cyril Ramaphosa to distinguished members of the continental body representing over 40 countries. In his presentation at the AU’s 33rd summit, the South African President wove history…

Read More

South African Research For HIV Drug Goes Back To The Drawing Board

Vaccinations have been halted in a test of a new HIV vaccine after it proved no more effective than a placebo, researchers announced. In the “Uhambo” study – also called HVTN 702 – tested in South Africa – it was determined that 129 people who received the vaccine developed HIV while 123 who were given…

Read More

New Hurdle For Nigerians Seeking U.S. Visas To Settle Here

She’s your pediatrician. He’s your surgeon. She’s a civil engineer. He has a doctorate. She’s an Emmy Award winner. He was a Chicago Bear. They’re Nigerian-Americans who have set down roots in Dallas, Chicago, Baltimore, Atlanta, Phoenix and Houston – the latter of which has the largest Nigerian population outside Brazil and Africa. They’re the…

Read More

U.S. Launches New Deal For Africa As ‘Growth And Opportunity’ Act Soon To Expire

The African Growth and Opportunity Act (known as “AGOA”) which aimed to assist the economies of sub-Saharan Africa and improve economic relations between the U.S. and the region is out of step with the new trade deals of the Trump administration. In other words, time’s up. A new economic plan is on the drawing board…

Read More

A ‘Green’ Message Shakes Up The Industry At Mining Confab In South Africa

After years of defending dirty extractive industries such as the mining of coal, large mining companies seemed to have switched sides and joined the Greens, or so it seemed at the African Mining Indaba held last week in South Africa. At the Indaba, the continent’s biggest gathering of one of its most vital industries, the companies…

Read More

Authorities In Ivory Coast Launch Demolition Of Shantytowns Housing Thousands

Bulldozers have begun demolishing homes built in the shantytowns of Abidjan, the commercial capital of the Ivory Coast, leaving thousands without shelter as authorities carry out plans to build a buffer zone around an international airport. This comes as large numbers of Ivorians are leaving remote farms and villages for a better life. The demolitions…

Read More

AP News Wire Issues Apology For Cutting The Only Black Activist From A Group Shot

A group shot of young environmental activists at the World Economic Forum in Davos, Switzerland, appeared in final form without one of the activists. Vanessa Nakate of Uganda was missing from the photo of Greta Thunberg, Luisa Neubauer, Loukina Tille and Isabelle Axelsson. All the young women in the photo were white. Nakate confronted AP…

Read More

By the Content of their Character

By Ray Curry, Secretary-Treasurer, UAW America’s Black History, which we celebrate this month, offers abundant examples across the centuries of how one person can make a difference, how one person can move an entire people forward. I am lucky enough to have witnessed the results of two such difference makers firsthand, both in my job…

Fear Paralyzes

By Dr. E. Faye Williams, Esq. (TriceEdneyWire.com) —With all the fearmongering, the unjust firings, transfers, the name-calling, the profanity laced rantings, the lying, the mean spirited actions, the early negative predictions about the Democratic Party and its candidates—one could just give up and ask, “What’s the use of trying to make a difference about anything?” Well,…

Kerner Report set standard for what a serious presidential candidate should champion

By Jesse Jackson (TriceEdneyWire.com) – As the Democratic presidential primaries move onto Nevada, South Carolina and the many Super Tuesday states, candidates turn their attention to people of color, and particularly African Americans. Many candidates find their rhetoric contradicted by their record; their promises conflicting with their performances. Donald Trump now seeks to woo black…

White House Budget Proposal Cuts $8.6 Billion from HUD

By Charlene Crowell  Once again, the White House Budget Proposal slashes funding and programs that many low-and-moderate income consumers rely upon.  From higher education to a repeated attack to deny the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau its full funding and financial independence from the annual congressional appropriations process, efforts to increase support to businesses continue while retreats…

Hair Discrimination is Alive and Well

By Julianne Malveaux (TriceEdneyWire.com) – Andrew Johnson, a high school wrestler, was forced to submit to the humiliating act of having his dreadlocks shorn or have his New Jersey team forfeit their match to the opposing team. A gleeful white woman seemed too pleased to invade the young man’s person, and his team won, but…

National Gun Violence Survivors Week Highlights Those Whose Lives Have Been Changed Forever

By Marc Morial (TriceEdneyWire.com) – On January 8, 2011, I was performing my favorite duty as a Congresswoman—meeting with my constituents—when it happened. In a matter of seconds, a gunman shot and killed six people, injured 12 others, and shot me in the head outside a Safeway in Tucson, Arizona. I keep the memories of…

Single Member District Is No Cure All

By Beverly Gadson-Birch Temperatures boiled over at Monday night’s heated meeting on single member District. Charleston County School Board member Kevin Hollingshead, an organizer of the meeting and vocal advocate for equity, said the meeting was called to receive input on a recent move by Charleston County Legislation Delegation to slow Superintendent Postlewait and the…

Read More
Listening to the Sistahs and Brothas Speak

By Hakim Abdul-Ali Greetings everyone. It’s now the assembled and festive time of the year in February where most ebony folk of color here in the USA illuminate their ethnic recognition genes by celebrating the annual Black History Month observances and activities. For many folk like me, we recognize and celebrate it everyday of every…

Read More
It All Depends On Who’s Got The Juice

By Barney Blakeney The South Carolina Department of Transportation vows it will be more considerate of the impact highway construction has on the minority communities it impacts. In the past highway construction usually went right through minority – Black – communities. Mrs. Lucas, my old sociology professor at Knoxville College said there was a reason…

Read More
Black Youths: Get a Grip

By Beverly Gadson-Birch It’s Black History Month! We are losing too many young people to gun violence. So, I am on my soapbox this week trying to reach out to our young people. Last week, sixteen-year-old Jaquarie Perry, a student at Summerville High School and on the track team, was gunned down while on his…

Read More
We Can’t Just Talk About It, We Gotta Be About It

By Barney Blakeney Here we go again. I got a call Sunday morning asking if I’m writing a story about Elliott Summey’s appointment as executive director of Charleston County Airport Authority. The issue actually wasn’t a priority for me. We’ve been here before. Powerbrokers do their do then Black folks get mad and want to…

Read More
Oops! and Other Comments

By Hakim Abdul-Ali   Before I  begin my article today, I must correct an error I made last week in my article entitled “The Suddenness of a Sad Tragedy.” In it I erroneously stated that my son was in possession of a 2002 Los Angeles Lakers’ championship jersey with the entire team’s signatures on it.…

Read More
Black History Month Sparks Focus on Black Men’s Prostate Cancer Rates: Survival Depends Upon Access & Screening

Op-Ed from the Men’s Health Network February is Black History Month and while typically a time to celebrate the achievements of African Americans around the world, Men’s Health Network (MHN) is taking the opportunity to spotlight a recent study highlighting the deeply concerning disparity between black men’s prostate health and that of other men nationwide.…

Read More
Medicare for All is important for South Carolinians, as well as for all Americans

The South Carolina AFL-CIO has been on record for many years as supporting Medicare for All. Most union members have better access to health care than others because their unions have fought to win those benefits from employers. However, as health insurance costs rise, and as employers try to take back those benefits we fought…

Read More
Letter to the editor in response to Chronicle article

I’m writing in response to the Charleston Chronicle’s January 17th article, “Santee Cooper Sale Should Be a 2020 Legislative Priority, Says Gullah Geechee Chamber.” Thank you for covering this issue, which is very important to me. I’m glad that the South Carolina House of Representatives passed a resolution for 100 percent clean energy by 2050.…

Read More
Citizens Want Excellence at IAAM

In a recent letter to the editor printed in the Post and Courier, Carol Ezell-Gilson asked why a project of the International African American Museum’s magnitude has gone unquestioned. The city is spending millions on a project to illuminate African American history with limited involvement of the African American community itself. The president and Chief…

Read More
Loading Family Features Content Widget
Loading Family Features Article

Take Our Poll

Do you want to the Justice Department to release its Community Oriented Policing Services assessment of the North Charleston Police Department?

View Results

Loading ... Loading ...

Hair Love, an 2020 Oscar®-winning animated short film from Matthew A. Cherry, tells the heartfelt story of an African American father learning to do his daughter’s hair for the first time