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Traditional Elections Will Test Africa’s Resistance To The Virus

Africa’s infection rates are still relatively low to the wonderment of some in the western world who predicted infection rates in the billions. In fact, African governments in many cases took preventative steps – from closing borders, social distancing, shutting educational institutions and banning mass gatherings. By April 19, the Africa CDC reported that 34…

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Desecration of Priceless Forests in Sierra Leone Halted by Coronavirus

The crashing economies in Asia have been a blessing – if temporary – to the endangered forests of Sierra Leone – particularly the tall stands of redwood trees, prized for their beauty, their rich mahogany color and their high quality for furniture. The illegal trade in the wood is one of the world’s most lucrative…

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Ghana Issues Warning Of Rising Virus Cases After ‘Superspreader’ Event

Speaking at a Sunday night national address, President Nana Akufo-Addo revealed that a single worker at a fish factory here has infected 533 co-workers, bringing the total number of infections to 4,700 – the highest number in West Africa. A superspreader event is a large COVID-19 infection cluster. The latest infection is part of a…

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Thousands Share Fake Facebook Post Of Corona Vaccine Killing Children

Depending on the source, “fake news” can be a smear on reputable news outlets just trying to do their job. But in other hands, it can be a source of misleading rumors read by thousands that do damage and are hard to correct. Such was the story titled “Scandal in Senegal” that circled West Africa…

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2020 Howard Grad Earns Ph.D. at Age 73

On April 26, 2020, Florence Nwando Onwusi Didigu, 73, defended her dissertation to earn her Ph.D. in Communication, Culture and Media Studies. Her dissertation and future book titled, “Igbo Collective Memory of the Nigeria – Biafra War (1967-1970): Reclaiming Forgotten Women’s Voices and Building Peace through a Gendered Lens,” is a reflection of the Igbo women…

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First Kenyan PhD Marine Scientist Passes

Kenya’s first PhD marine scientist, Prof Mohamed Hyder, died at his home in Kizingo, Mombasa, after a long illness. The 88-year-old leaves behind a wife and three children. After completing his undergraduate work at Makerere University, Professor Hyder moved to Scotland where he took up biology, which was his passion. While teaching at Makerere, he…

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ANC Military Leader Who Shared Prison Time With Madiba Passes

One time ANC military Denis Goldberg was one of Nelson Mandela’s two co-defendants from the 1963-64 Rivonia trial at which 10 men were on trial for their lives for conspiring to overthrow the apartheid regime by force. Goldberg was sentenced to life imprisonment alongside Mandela for the crime of sabotage, serving 22 years at Pretoria…

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With Fela Kuti, Drummer Tony Allen Created The Afrobeat Sound

Pioneering drummer for many decades, Tony Allen was a musical partner of the Nigerian singer, composer and activist Fela Anikulapo-Kuti. He passed away in Paris at age 79. Allen was the drummer and musical director of Fela’s band Africa ’70 and was one of the primary co-founders of the Afrobeat sound. As Fela sharpened his…

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U.N. Unveils Fight Against A Fake News ‘Infodemic’ That Puts Lives At Risk 

While Americans hotly debate the subject of “fake news,” Africans and others around the world marked a day for reflection on press freedoms in theory and in practice. The theme for this year’s event launched by the U.N. agency UNESCO was “Journalism without fear or favor”. The state of journalism in most parts of the…

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Catastrophic Floods, Linked To Human Activities, Submerge Lake Victoria Region

Pounding rains over the last two months have set off catastrophic flooding of biblical proportions, surging over the weekend into some 20 of the 47 Kenyan counties bordering Lake Victoria – a massive trans-boundary body of water shared by Kenya, Tanzania and Uganda. Some 23 rivers empty water into the lake. “These floods are the…

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COVID-19 — My Personal Battle from a Positive to a Negative Result

By Jeffrey L. Boney, NNPA Newswire Contributor “Jeffrey, unfortunately, your test came back positive for the Coronavirus.” Hearing those words from the doctor, March 27th, shook me to the core. Was that a death sentence for me? Was it a coincidence that my mom years earlier had died in the same month of March? Was…

Celebrating Bro. Malcolm X, A Warrior and Master Teacher

By A. Peter Bailey (TriceEdneyWire.com) – A former United States president has been quoted as saying “Knowledge will forever govern ignorance. And a people who want to govern themselves must arm themselves with the power knowledge gives.” No one whom I have ever met more clearly understood the realness of that observation than Brother Malcolm…

Super Special Graduation

By Dr. E. Faye Williams, Esq. (TriceEdneyWire.com) – Everybody who has ever graduated from anything knows how special graduation is. If you made it to graduation, not only were you excited about doing something not only you considered important, but the fact that you made it, made a lot of people happy. Friends, relatives– especially…

Ida B’s Pulitzer – Both Too Late and Right on Time

By Julianne Malveaux (TriceEdneyWire.com) – Exactly one hundred and thirty-six years to the day after Ida B. Wells was thrown off a Chesapeake and Ohio railroad train, she was awarded a Pulitzer Prize special citation for her “outstanding and courageous reporting on the horrific and vicious violence against African Americans in the era of lynchings.” …

The Murder of Ahmaud Arbery — and Our Continuing Terror

By Jesse Jackson (TriceEdneyWire.com) – Today there is a national outcry about the murder of Ahmaud Arbery. The public condemnation has forced a belated response. Those accused of his murder finally have been arrested. His murder has become a global embarrassment for whites. For blacks, however, it is another humiliation, a continuing terror. It is the normal…

Congress Must Act Now to Deliver Relief to Cities – the Economic Engines of the Nation

By Marc Morial (TriceEdneyWire.com) – “Cities are the economic engines of the nation and home to the workers who make those engines run. The result of the growing pandemic is that most of these engines, which account for 91 percent of U.S. Gross Domestic Product and wage income, have slowed, and many have stopped. Reliable…

Living Through Challenging Times

By Beverly Gadson-Birch I do not know about you, but I need to take a break from the news. As the country opens back up for business, folks are already letting their guard down. They are not wearing masks and practicing social distancing in public places. It is good some restrictions are being lifted, but shoppers…

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Change

By Barney Blakeney As the June 9 Democratic primary elections loom in the shadow of South Carolina’s reopening of businesses amid continuing escalation of the coronavirus pandemic which affects Blacks at disproportionately higher rates than others, the African American community has much to consider. Assertive, foresighted and progressive political leadership among Black elected officials has…

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Silent Reflections on a Spring Day

By Hakim Abdul-Ali Today is one of those days where I’m silently “vibing” on simple realities signifying that I’m seeking peace and greater understanding of what the Most High Alone is presently revealing to me. I’m alone and very isolated while thinking about the quietness of this springtime power moment, and it’s truly an awesome…

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Folks, Why Make Your Head So Hard?

By Beverly Gadson-Birch Last week, several groups of protestors converged on Columbia. There were those in support of opening the state back up for business immediately and those in opposition. I know no one asked me, but I support those that oppose re-opening the state prematurely and putting more lives at risk of contracting or dying…

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Take Me Out To The Ball Game

By Barney Blakeney I can’t remember exactly when it was I first met Augustus ‘ Gus’ Holt. It was a long time ago. But over the years I found him to be giving, unselfish, appreciative and incessant. After a long battle with various health issues, Gus died April 16 at 73. Over the past few…

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We’re All Standing in the Need of Prayer

By Hakim Abdul-Ali In my view, everyday is a day of celebration because it represents a reflective spiritual occasion because, during these times of personal struggles and massive uncertainties, we all have so much to be thankful for. The living process is becoming more chaotic with each passing moment. I was thinking about what I…

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Re-opening During a Pandemic takes Strategic Planning for Sustainability

As states reopen their economies during the Coronavirus pandemic, opportunities abound to make African American businesses sustainable. To keep your doors, open right now do not disregard the importance of ensuring customers have a safe, healthy shopping experience. Don’t become a statistic because you failed to take measures to assure your customers you care about…

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Lowcountry Local First Advocates A New Normal For Charleston’s Economic Future

Once the panic subsides, if the panic subsides, we would be mistaken to not pause long enough to think about the future of our city, region, and country with a new lens. Charleston’s real estate boom has been like a Girls Gone Wild video of investors clamoring to own a piece of the Holy City.…

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COVID-19 and Black America: Things A Vaccine Will Not Cure

By Dr. William Small, Jr. Old sayings often get to be old because they are most often true. One such saying that comes immediately to mind, suggests that when America gets a cold, Black America gets pneumonia. The current Covid-19 crisis illustrates that in spite of all of the political, social and economic progress that…

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COVID-19 is Disproportionately Impacting the Black Community; What Are Our South Carolina Officials Going to Do About it?

There is a clear racial disparity in how the coronavirus is impacting South Carolina communities. Throughout the United States and right here in Palmetto State, African-Americans are being disproportionately harmed by COVID-19. While African-Americans make up 27 percent of the state’s population, 57 percent of reported deaths and 36 percent of confirmed cases have been…

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As COVID-19 continues to spread amid a growing number of fatalities, Dr. James Hildreth said it’s critical that everyone follows stay-at-home orders, social distancing guidelines, and anything else that could help keep Americans safe during the pandemic