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Experimental Drug Gets Green Light For New Ebola Outbreak

The Ebola virus, which took thousands of lives in West Africa, has resurfaced in central Africa. This time, health officials are ready to put an experimental drug to the test. The outbreak, which has caused at least 19 deaths and 39 confirmed and suspected cases, was reported in the Democratic Republic of the Congo’s (DRC)…

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Did Trump Meet His Match in President of Nigeria?

Try as he might, President Trump couldn’t land a deal with Nigerian leader Muhammadu Buhari at their tête-à-tête in Washington last month. Deploying his usual tough talk on trade, the U.S. president was shooting for a deal that would open the doors to U.S. farm products by “ripping down” Nigerian trade barriers that protect the…

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Zimbabwean Musician Returns From Exile

After 14 long years in the U.S. state of Oregon, singer, composer and bandleader Thomas Mapfumo has come home to Zimbabwe. His recent performance, for some 20,000 ticket holders at the open-air Glamis Arena, only slowed down as the sun began to rise. “I thought maybe I wasn’t going to be able to come back…

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A Call For Justice For African Children

Children are very much on the political and public agenda across Africa today. The African Union has adopted a charter to protect them and a mechanism to hold governments accountable for the fulfillment of their rights. Even so, the reality on the ground is somber and sobering. The number of child prisoners continent wide is…

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Debate Heats Over South African White Privilege

Members of the opposition Democratic Alliance (DA) are reportedly squabbling over a casual remark by the head of the party, Mmusi Maimane, who observed that white privilege and black poverty were critical issues that needed to be addressed. “I firmly stand by comments I made on Freedom Day,” Maimane tweeted on Sunday. “South Africa remains…

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After Years in Exile, a ‘Fritter Seller’ Plots Political Comeback

Ending four years in political exile, Dr. Joyce Banda, once demeaned as a mere “fritter seller”, returned this week in full form, risking possible arrest as she greeted crowds of joyous supporters at the Blantyre airport and in her home town. The second woman to lead an African country and the first woman president in…

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Nigerian Leader Promised Banned Military Aircraft At Meeting With Trump

At a long-awaited meeting between President Donald Trump and Nigerian President Muhammadu Buhari, the U.S. president announced the approval of a dozen war planes for Nigeria whose sale had been frozen by former President Barack Obama. Rebuking his Nigerian counterpart for the proliferation of violence throughout that country, Trump expressed concern for “the burning of…

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South African Women Take Prize For Anti-Nuclear Effort

Using the knowledge gained in the anti-apartheid struggle, two South African women challenged a secret, multibillion-dollar nuclear deal that would have dotted South Africa with nuclear power plants from Russia. The women, Makoma Lekalakala and Liziwe McDaid, waged a five-year court battle against the plants. Against all odds, including a secret agreement between Russian leader…

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More African Nations Discard Term Limits and Let Leaders ‘Rule for Life’

Absent any influence from the White House towards democratic reforms, a number of African leaders are quietly tweaking their laws to ensure a lock on the presidency for decades to come. Fifteen of Africa’s 54 heads of state hold or have held power for more than 20 years. Yet Africa has the world’s youngest population…

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Major Unrest Tests South African President Only Three Months Into Office

South African President Cyril Ramaphosa cut short his appearance at the Commonwealth leaders’ summit in London after rising citizen anger at corruption and poor public service at home exploded into violence. South African police fired rubber bullets at protestors while shops were looted, roads were blocked and vehicles set on fire. Some 23 people were…

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Trump and the Lies That Lead to War

By Dr. Wilmer J. Leon, III In his “Speech on the Iran Nuclear Deal,” on May 8, 2018 President Trump said, “In theory, the so-called ‘Iran deal’ was supposed to protect the United States and our allies from the lunacy of an Iranian nuclear bomb.” He went on to say, “In fact, the deal allowed…

Golfing While Black: Grandview Golf Club Asks Five Black Women to Leave the Club for Golfing Too Slow

By Sandra Thompson, Esq., President, NAACP York County, Pa. Branch On Saturday, April 21, 2018, I woke up excited, anticipating a round of golf at Grandview Golf Club in York, Pa. I was going to play with four ladies from “Sisters in the Fairway” (SITF), a group of about 15 professional, predominantly African American women…

State of Black America® Finds African-Americans Drastically Underrepresented in Tech Industries

By Marc H. Morial, President and CEO of the National Urban League “It is our hope that this document will pierce the dark veil of neglect that has thus far smothered efforts to right the wrongs of the past and present. It is presented as an alternative to failed public policies. I hope that it…

Checking the Narrative on Black Women’s Leadership: It’s Not Only Time to Court Black Women’s Votes, But Also Support Them As Candidates

By Glynda C. Carr and Kimberly Peeler-Allen In a recently published Rolling Stone article, recording artist Janelle Monae exposes a disconcerting, yet largely universal awareness shared by Black women seeking to exercise power: when we reveal ourselves to be human and inevitably imperfect, we are too often labeled unworthy and incapable of leading. It’s why,…

No Turning Back

By Marian Wright Edelman, President of the Children’s Defense Fund A new Government Accountability Office (GAO) report released last month, “K-12 Education: Discipline Disparities for Black Students, Boys, and Students with Disabilities,” reminds us once again that suspensions and expulsions continue at high rates and offer grave risks to students. The report by this federal…

Ungrateful, Non-voting Negroes Ignore Bloody War for Black Voting Rights

By Jeffrey L. Boney, NNPA Newswire Contributor “I’m just one vote.” “My vote won’t matter.” “Them White folks gone do what they wanna do anyway.” These are some of the many excuses given by some African Americans when it comes to exercising their right to vote; a right fought for by many people in this…

Discipline Determines Destiny

By Barney Blakeney   Two phone calls over the past couple of weeks again got me thinking about Black folks taking the initiative to determine our own destiny. I’ve got a thing on my desk that says “Discipline, not desire, determines our destiny”. Wish I woulda, coulda, shoulda doesn’t get it done. We must exercise…

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Muslim Women Embrace Ramadan

By Hakim Abdul-Ali   The world’s almost two billion adherents of the Islamic faith began their annual month-long fasting period today. It’s the time of the year when sincere Muslims fast from dawn to sunset each day,abstaining from food, water and having sex with their spouses during the daily fasting period and also performing extra…

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Respect Builds Character and Business

By Beverly Gadson-Birch Two Black men appropriately dressed enters Starbucks to meet a friend to discuss business over a cup of coffee and find themselves handcuffed and carted off to jail. Why? They asked to use the restroom without making a purchase. Really? At one of this country’s most prestigious institutions, Yale, a White student…

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Thirty Years After Her Death Septima Clark Still Teaches

By Barney Blakeney The May 3 unveiling of the marker noting the birthplace of Septima Poinsette Clark was more powerful than I thought it would be. The College of Charleston coordinated the event that included a luncheon and portrait unveiling honoring a woman too few realize was responsible for contributing to much of what America…

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Hailing the Mothers of Our Culture

By Hakim Abdul-Ali Next Sunday in the good old USA, there will be an observance day usually set aside for  the yearly recognition and valued appreciation of the past and present mothers in our lives. Traditionally, it’s called Mother’s Day. With the greatest respect to all the women in America, who are mothers of their…

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Mothers, Fight For Your Sons

By Beverly Gadson-Birch    As we approach Mother’s Day, I am reminded of what some mothers go through for their children. Last Saturday, Timothy Taylor’s mom, Joanne, organized another march to free her son. Saturday’s march was the second by Timothy’s supporters to draw attention to his unjust imprisonment.  If you have not been keeping up…

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Petition to Place the International African American Museum at the Wilmot J. Frazier Elementary School Site

We, the following citizens of Charleston, South Carolina, are petitioning Mayor John C. Tecklenburg to fulfill the promise made by his predecessor Joseph P. Riley in 1975. Riley was elected with overwhelming support of the African American community in Charleston and promised to spread the city’s wealth the community that helped create it, but never…

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Ready, Get Set, Vote

Voters in our communities will soon be casting votes in the South Carolina Primary Election. Eligible citizens have until May 13 to register so they can vote in the June 12th Primaries and June 26th Primary Runoffs (runoff if needed). Now is also the time to familiarize ourselves with the candidates on the ballot and…

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Real support for moms this Mother’s Day

This Mother’s Day we celebrate moms who are working to be the best moms they can be. Here in Charleston, many moms may be in need of some extra support, especially those women who are expecting their first baby. When I was pregnant with my first baby, I had so many questions about what to…

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Good(will) for the Environment & Community: The Case for Donating Locally

By Robert Smith, Palmetto Goodwill President/CEO Think globally, act locally is a phrase often used to encourage people to take small actions in order to do their part toward combating worldwide issues that seem daunting to take on. Protecting our planet is a perfect example.  One may ask, “What small actions can individuals take that actually…

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Celebration or Ritual?

  By Dr. William Small, Jr. The practice of effectively organizing and celebrating the importance of events is validated by its existence in all cultures. Celebrations on their face speak to values which define and affirm a people. Christmas, Columbus Day, the Fourth of July, for example all say something about the soul and character…

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A Public Call for School Board Members to Dismantle Racial Barriers in Education

The status of public education in Charleston County has been the subject of intense though warranted scrutiny by a high-profile report, “The State of Racial Disparities in Charleston County, South Carolina 2000-2015.” Dr. Stacey Patton, a professor of History and Journalism at Morgan State University and acclaimed author, published the report in consultation with the…

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